Torgersen Island

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Torgersen
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Torgersen
Location in Antarctica
Geography
Location Antarctica
Coordinates 64°46′S64°5′W / 64.767°S 64.083°W / -64.767; -64.083 Coordinates: 64°46′S64°5′W / 64.767°S 64.083°W / -64.767; -64.083
Archipelago Palmer Archipelago
Administration
Administered under the Antarctic Treaty System
Demographics
Population0

Torgersen Island is a small rocky island lying just east of Litchfield Island in the entrance to Arthur Harbour, off the south-west coast of Anvers Island in the Palmer Archipelago of Antarctica. It was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1955 and named by the UK-APC for Torstein Torgersen, first mate of the Harbor in late February 1955, preceding the vessel Norsel in one of the ship's boats and making soundings.

Litchfield Island island in Antarctica

Litchfield Island is a rocky island 0.9 kilometres (0.5 nmi) long and rising to 50 m (164 ft), lying in Arthur Harbour, 0.9 kilometres (0.5 nmi) south of Norsel Point, off the south-west coast of Anvers Island in the Palmer Archipelago of Antarctica.

Arthur Harbour

Arthur Harbour is a small harbour entered between Bonaparte Point and Norsel Point on the south-west coast of Anvers Island in the Palmer Archipelago of Antarctica.

Anvers Island high, mountainous island 61 km (38 miles) long, outside Antarctica

Anvers Island or Antwerp Island or Antwerpen Island or Isla Amberes is a high, mountainous island 61 km long, the largest in the Palmer Archipelago of Antarctica. It was discovered by John Biscoe in 1832 and named in 1898 by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition under Adrien de Gerlache after the province of Antwerp in Belgium. It lies south-west of Brabant Island at the south-western end of the group. The south-western coastline of the island forms part of the Southwest Anvers Island and Palmer Basin Antarctic Specially Managed Area. Cormorant Island, an Important Bird Area, lies 1 km off the south coast.

Contents

Birds

The island forms part of the Northern Arthur Harbour Important Bird Area (IBA), identified as such by BirdLife International because it supports significant seabird breeding colonies. [1]

Important Bird Area area recognized as being globally important habitat for the conservation of birds populations

An Important Bird and Biodiversity Area (IBA) is an area identified using an internationally agreed set of criteria as being globally important for the conservation of bird populations.

BirdLife International is a global partnership of conservation organisations that strives to conserve birds, their habitats, and global biodiversity, working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources. It is the world's largest partnership of conservation organisations, with over 120 partner organisations.

Seabird birds that have adapted to life within the marine environment

Seabirds are birds that are adapted to life within the marine environment. While seabirds vary greatly in lifestyle, behaviour and physiology, they often exhibit striking convergent evolution, as the same environmental problems and feeding niches have resulted in similar adaptations. The first seabirds evolved in the Cretaceous period, and modern seabird families emerged in the Paleogene.

See also

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Cormorant Island island of Antarctica

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Elephant Rocks (Antarctica) geographical object

The Elephant Rocks in Antarctica are a group of three prominent rocks connected by shoals, located between Torgersen Island and the north-west entrance to Arthur Harbour, off the south-west coast of Anvers Island. The name became established locally among UdARP personnel at nearby Palmer Station in about 1971, as the rocks provide habitat favoured by elephant seals.

Humble Island

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References

  1. "Northern Arthur Harbour area". BirdLife data zone: Important Bird Areas. BirdLife International. 2013. Retrieved 2013-01-11.