Trogolaphysa carpenteri

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Trogolaphysa carpenteri
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Subphylum:
Class:
Entognatha (disputed)
Subclass:
Order:
Superfamily:
Family:
Genus:
Trogolaphysa
Binomial name
Trogolaphysa carpenteri
(Palacios-Vargas, Ojeda, & Christiansen, 1985)

Trogolaphysa carpenteri is a species of aquatic springtail that is known from Argentina, Costa Rica, Mexico, and Cayenne, French Guiana. [1]

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References

  1. Charles W. Heckman (2001). Encyclopedia of South American Aquatic Insects: Collembola: Illustrated Keys. Kluwer Academic Publishers. p. 282. ISBN   0-7923-6704-9.