True Grit (song)

Last updated
"True Grit"
Single by Glen Campbell
from the album True Grit (soundtrack)
B-side "Hava Nagila"
ReleasedJuly 1969
RecordedMarch 13, 1969
RCA Studio, Hollywood, California
March 18, 1969
Capitol Studios, Hollywood, California
Genre Country, pop
Length2:32
Label Capitol
Songwriter(s) Don Black
Elmer Bernstein
Producer(s) Neely Plumb
Al DeLory
Glen Campbell singles chronology
"Where's the Playground Susie"
(1969)
"True Grit"
(1969)
"Try a Little Kindness"
(1969)

"True Grit" is a song written by Don Black and Elmer Bernstein, and recorded by American country music artist Glen Campbell. It was released in July 1969 as the first single from his album True Grit . The song peaked at number 9 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart. [1] It also reached number 1 on the RPM Country Tracks chart in Canada. [2]

Contents

Chart performance

Chart (1969)Peak
position
US Hot Country Songs ( Billboard ) [3] 9
US Billboard Hot 100 [4] 35
U.S. Billboard Easy Listening7
Canadian RPM Country Tracks1
Canadian RPM Top Singles23
Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary4

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References

  1. "Glen Campbell singles". Allmusic . Retrieved 30 March 2011.
  2. "RPM Country Singles for September 20, 1969". RPM . Retrieved 30 March 2011.
  3. "Glen Campbell Chart History (Hot Country Songs)". Billboard.
  4. "Glen Campbell Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard.