United Kingdom railway station categories

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The 2,520 railway stations on the National Rail network in Great Britain are classified into six categories (two of which are each divided into two subcategories) by the Department for Transport. The scheme was devised in 1996 [1] and there was a review in 2009 when 106 stations changed categories. [2] The categorisation scheme is owned by Network Rail, the site landlord of most of the stations. [1]

Contents

Some stations are in more than one category: for instance, at London St Pancras International, the surface platforms are in category A and the Thameslink platforms are in category C1.

Stations in Scotland are categorised and counted in the totals below, for example Glasgow Central and Edinburgh Waverley are both category A, [1] but are not included in the lists of stations for each category. [2]

Categorisation scheme

CategoryNumber (2011 [3] [ may be outdated as of November 2022 ])DescriptionTrips per annumExamples
A 28National hubover 2 million Birmingham New Street, London King's Cross
B 67Regional interchangeover 2 million Clapham Junction, Preston
C C1 248Important feeder0.5–2 million Grantham, Plymouth
C2 Burgess Hill, Tamworth
D 298Medium staffed0.25–0.5 million Abergavenny, Penrith
E 679Small staffedunder 0.25 million Boston, Oakham
F F1 1,200Small unstaffedunder 0.25 million Beccles, Bishop Auckland
F2 Llanfairpwll, Winchelsea
Total2,520

Category C stations are sub-divided into C1 (city or busy junction) and C2 (other busy railheads). The only exception is Worthing, which has not been given a subcategory; it is listed by DfT as "C". [2]

Category F stations are sub-divided into F1 (over 100,000 journeys per annum) and F2 (others). [2]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Part A: Consistent Standards" (PDF). Better Rail Stations. Department for Transport. 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 3 April 2014.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Part D: Annexes" (PDF). Better Rail Stations. Department for Transport. 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 3 April 2014.
  3. "Network RUS Stations" (PDF). Network Route Utilisation Strategy, Stations. Network Rail. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 March 2016. Retrieved 9 January 2013.