United Nations Security Council Resolution 1367

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UN Security Council
Resolution 1367
Scg02.png
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
Date10 September 2001
Meeting no.4,366
CodeS/RES/1367 (Document)
SubjectThe situation in Kosovo
Voting summary
  • 15 voted for
  • None voted against
  • None abstained
ResultAdopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council resolution 1367, adopted unanimously on 10 September 2001, after recalling resolutions 1160 (1998), 1199 (1998), 1203 (1998) and reaffirming resolutions 1244 (1999) and 1345 (2001) in particular, the Council terminated the arms embargo against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) after it had satisfied Council demands to withdraw from Kosovo and allow a political dialogue to begin. [1]

Contents

The Security Council noted that demands contained in Resolution 1160 had been satisfied and further recognised the difficult security situation along the administrative boundary of Kosovo and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Weapons and ammunition would continue to be prevented from entering Kosovo. The Secretary-General Kofi Annan stated that the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia had allowed humanitarian organisations and United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights access to Kosovo. [2]

Acting under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the Council terminated the arms embargo and dissolved the Committee of Security Council tasked with monitoring the sanctions. [3]

See also

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References

  1. "Council terminates prohibitions on arms sales to Yugoslavia". United Nations. 10 September 2001.
  2. Associated Press (10 September 2001). "Security Council lifts arms embargo on Yugoslavia". USA Today .
  3. Gowlland-Debbas, Vera; Tehindrazanarivelo, Djacoba Liva (2004). National implementation of United Nations sanctions: a comparative study. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. p. 10. ISBN   978-90-04-14090-5.