University of Illinois Press

Last updated
University of Illinois Press
Parent company University of Illinois
Founded1918
Country of origin United States
Headquarters location Champaign, Illinois
Distribution Chicago Distribution Center (US) [1]
Combined Academic Publishers (EMEA)
Scholarly Book Services (Canada)
Footprint Books (Australia) [2]
Publication types Books, journals
Official website www.press.uillinois.edu

The University of Illinois Press (UIP) is a major American university press and is part of the University of Illinois system. Founded in 1918, the press publishes some 120 new books each year, plus 33 scholarly journals, and several electronic projects. Strengths include ethnic and multicultural studies, Lincoln and Illinois history, and the large and diverse series Music in American Life. [3]

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

University press publisher associated with a university

A university press is an academic publishing house specializing in academic monographs and scholarly journals. Most are nonprofit and an integral component of a large research university. They publish work that has been reviewed by scholars in the field. They produce mainly scholarly works, but also often have "popular" titles, such as books on religion or on regional topics. Because scholarly books are mostly unprofitable, university presses may also publish textbooks and reference works, which tend to have larger audiences and sell more copies. Most university presses operate at a loss and are subsidized by their owners; others are required to break even. Demand has fallen as library budgets are cut and the online sales of used books undercut the new book market. Many presses are experimenting with electronic publishing.

University of Illinois system system of public universities in Illinois

The University of Illinois System is a system of public universities in Illinois consisting of three universities: Chicago, Springfield, and Urbana–Champaign. Across its three universities, the University of Illinois System enrolls more than 83,700 students. It had an operating budget of $6.5 billion in 2017.

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References

  1. "Publishers served by the Chicago Distribution Center". University of Chicago Press. Retrieved 2017-09-12.
  2. "UI Press | International Sales Representation" . Retrieved 2017-12-02.
  3. Jason Boog (3 June 2009). "Illinois UP Receives Lifetime Achievement Award". Mediabistro.com. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012. Retrieved 14 September 2010.