Viscount Lisle

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Arms of Talbot, Viscount Lisle: Gules, a lion rampant within a bordure engrailed or Talbot arms.svg
Arms of Talbot, Viscount Lisle: Gules, a lion rampant within a bordure engrailed or
Arms of Grey, Viscount Lisle: Barry of six argent and azure in chief three torteaux Coat of Arms of Grey.svg
Arms of Grey, Viscount Lisle: Barry of six argent and azure in chief three torteaux

The title of Viscount Lisle has been created six times in the Peerage of England. The first creation, on 30 October 1451, was for John Talbot, 1st Baron Lisle. Upon the death of his son Thomas at the Battle of Nibley Green in 1470, the viscountcy became extinct and the barony abeyant.

Contents

In 1475, the abeyance terminated in favour of Thomas' sister, Elizabeth Talbot, 3rd Baroness Lisle, wife of Edward Grey, 1st Viscount Lisle. Sir Edward was created Viscount Lisle on 28 June 1483, but the title became extinct on the death of their son John in 1504. The viscounty now passed to John's posthumous daughter Elizabeth, whose wardship was granted to Sir Charles Brandon. He contracted to marry her, and was created Viscount Lisle on 15 May 1513 in consequence. Charles Brandon later annulled the contract and married Mary Tudor, Dowager Queen of France in 1515, surrendering the title Viscount Lisle before 1523. Elizabeth died in 1519 and the barony passed to her aunt, also named Elizabeth Grey. Her husband, Arthur Plantagenet was created Viscount Lisle on 25 April 1523. He continued to hold the title after her death in about 1525. After Arthur Plantagenet's death in 1542, the viscountcy went to Elizabeth Grey's eldest son by her first marriage, John Dudley, "by the right of his mother". [2] He was created Viscount Lisle on 12 March 1542, and later rose to be Duke of Northumberland; but he forfeited his titles upon his execution and attainder in 1553.

The final creation of the viscountcy was on 4 May 1605 as a subsidiary title for Robert Sidney, 1st Earl of Leicester, grandson of the Duke of Northumberland. It became extinct with the Earldom of Leicester in 1743.

Viscounts Lisle, First Creation (1451)

Viscounts Lisle, Second Creation (1483)

Viscounts Lisle, Third Creation (1513)

Viscounts Lisle, Fourth Creation (1523)

Viscounts Lisle, Fifth Creation (1543)

Viscounts Lisle, Sixth Creation (1605)

See also

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References

  1. Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.1015, Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury & Waterford
  2. Loades, David (1996): John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland 1504–1553, Clarendon Press, ISBN   0-19-820193-1, p. 48