Edward Grey, 1st Viscount Lisle

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Arms of Grey de Ruthyn: Barry of six argent and azure in chief three torteaux Coat of Arms of Grey.svg
Arms of Grey de Ruthyn: Barry of six argent and azure in chief three torteaux

Edward Grey, 1st Viscount Lisle (died 1492) was an English nobleman who was created Viscount Lisle in 1483, [1] in recognition of his wife's descent.

Contents

Origins

Sir Edward Grey was a younger son of Sir Edward Grey (c. 1415–1457) (a son by his second marriage of Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn) by his wife Elizabeth Ferrers, 6th Baroness Ferrers of Groby (1419–1483) [2] [3] [4] His father was summoned to parliament as Baron Ferrers of Groby in right of his wife. [5] His eldest brother was Sir John Grey of Groby (c. 1432-1461), a Lancastrian knight, the first husband of Elizabeth Woodville who later married King Edward IV, and great-great-grandfather of Lady Jane Grey.

Marriage and children

Arms of Talbot: Gules, a lion rampant within a bordure engrailled or Talbot arms.svg
Arms of Talbot: Gules, a lion rampant within a bordure engrailled or

Sir Edward Grey married Elizabeth Talbot, 3rd Baroness Lisle, daughter and eventual heiress of John Talbot, 1st Viscount Lisle and 1st Baron Lisle (1423–1453), 4th son of John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury by his wife Margaret Beauchamp, heiress to the Barony of Lisle created by writ for her great-great-grandfather Gerard de Lisle (d.1360). [7] By Elizabeth Talbot he had the following children: [8]

There might have been another daughter-Margaret, Countess of Wiltshire, wife of Edward Stafford, 2nd Earl of Wiltshire(who died in 1499), they had no issue.

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John Husee

John Husee was a London merchant, and the business agent in England of Arthur Plantagenet, 1st Viscount Lisle (d.1542), during Lisle's absence abroad whilst serving as Governor of Calais during the years 1533 to 1540. Lord Lisle's correspondence was seized by the state when he was arrested in May 1540 for treason and heresy, and as a result 515 letters written by Husee between 1533 and 1540 to Lord and Lady Lisle survive, mainly now preserved amongst the State Papers held at the National Archives. They were transcribed into modern English and in 1981 published, together with all the other Lisle Papers, by Muriel St Clare Byrne in her six-volume work "The Lisle Letters".

John Rolle (1522–1570)

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John Basset (1518–1541) was a young English gentleman from Devon, a member of the old Basset family, and heir to a substantial inheritance. His short life is well documented in the Lisle Papers. He studied law at Lincolns Inn and at the age of 20, at the start of a promising career, entered the household of Thomas Cromwell, Lord Privy Seal, but died suddenly aged only 23, albeit having married and produced a son and heir, born posthumously. His stepfather and father-in-law was Arthur Plantagenet, 1st Viscount Lisle (d.1542), Lord Deputy of Calais 1533–1540, a bastard son of King Edward IV and thus uncle of King Henry VIII, whose arrest with that of his mother in 1540 at Calais for heresy and treason, was a major, potentially catastrophic, event in his life. He died a year after the arrests, from an unknown illness, but his siblings all went on to have successful careers, especially his younger brother James, mostly as royal courtiers, apparently unaffected by the crisis.

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References

  1. Byrne, Muriel St Clare, (ed.), The Lisle Letters, London & Chicago, 1981, 6 vols., vol.1, appendix 9, pedigree of Arthur Plantagenet, 1st Viscount Lisle
  2. Byrne, Muriel St Clare, (ed.), The Lisle Letters, London & Chicago, 1981, 6 vols., vol.1, appendix 9, pedigree of Arthur Plantagenet, 1st Viscount Lisle
  3. Richardson
  4. Oxford Dictionary of Biography
  5. Douglas Richardson & Kimball G. Everingham, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, p. 359
  6. Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.1015, E. of Shrewsbury & Waterford
  7. Byrne, Muriel St Clare, (ed.), The Lisle Letters, London & Chicago, 1981, 6 vols., vol.1, appendix 9, pedigree of Arthur Plantagenet, 1st Viscount Lisle
  8. Byrne, vol 1, appendix 9
Peerage of England
New creation Viscount Lisle
2nd creation
1483–1492
Succeeded by