Watt (crater)

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Watt
Steinheil crater Watt crater 4071 h1 h2.jpg
Lunar Orbiter 4 image, with Steinheil at top and Watt below
Coordinates 49°30′S48°36′E / 49.5°S 48.6°E / -49.5; 48.6 Coordinates: 49°30′S48°36′E / 49.5°S 48.6°E / -49.5; 48.6
Diameter 66 km
Depth Unknown
Colongitude 313° at sunrise
Eponym James Watt

Watt is a lunar impact crater that is located in the southeastern part of the Moon. It was named after Scottish inventor James Watt. [1] The northwestern third of the crater rim has been completely overlain by the same-sized Steinheil, leaving much of the interior floor covered with the outer rampart of ejecta from the latter formation. The remainder of the rim of Watt is somewhat jagged in appearance, with an inward bulge along the southeast rim and a pair of small outward projections to the northeast. The rim is otherwise relatively sharply defined, with only a minor amount of wear.

Lunar craters

Lunar craters are impact craters on Earth's Moon. The Moon's surface has many craters, almost all of which were formed by impacts.

Impact crater Circular depression on a solid astronomical body formed by a hypervelocity impact of a smaller object

An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon, or other solid body in the Solar System or elsewhere, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse, impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Meteor Crater is a well-known example of a small impact crater on Earth.

Moon Earths natural satellite

Earth's Moon is an astronomical body that orbits the planet and acts as its only permanent natural satellite. It is the fifth-largest satellite in the Solar System, and the largest among planetary satellites relative to the size of the planet that it orbits. The Moon is, after Jupiter's satellite Io, the second-densest satellite in the Solar System among those whose densities are known.

Nearby craters of note include Biela to the south-southeast, Rosenberger to the southwest, and the walled plain Janssen to the northwest past Steinheil.

Biela (crater) impact crater

Biela is a lunar impact crater that is located in the rugged highlands of the southeastern Moon. It is named after Austrian astronomer Wilhelm von Biela. The crater lies to the east of Rosenberger, to the southeast of the Watt–Steinheil double crater.

Rosenberger (crater)

Rosenberger is an old lunar impact crater in the southeastern part of the Moon. It was named after German astronomer Otto August Rosenberger.

Janssen (lunar crater) impact crater

Janssen is an ancient impact crater located in the highland region near the southeastern lunar limb. The entire structure has been heavily worn and is marked by many lesser crater impacts. The outer wall is breached in multiple locations, but the outline of the crater rim can still be observed. The wall forms a distinctive hexagonal shape upon the rugged lunar surface, with a slight curvature at the vertices.

Satellite craters

Satellite craters map Watt sattelite craters map.jpg
Satellite craters map

By convention these features are identified on lunar maps by placing the letter on the side of the crater midpoint that is closest to Watt.

Watt crater and its satellite craters taken from Earth in 2012 at the University of Hertfordshire's Bayfordbury Observatory with the telescopes Meade LX200 14" and Lumenera Skynyx 2-1 Watt lunar crater map.jpg
Watt crater and its satellite craters taken from Earth in 2012 at the University of Hertfordshire's Bayfordbury Observatory with the telescopes Meade LX200 14" and Lumenera Skynyx 2-1
WattLatitudeLongitudeDiameter
A50.3° S46.4° E10 km
B50.1° S48.0° E6 km
C50.0° S51.5° E24 km
D50.3° S55.2° E32 km
E49.7° S55.3° E10 km
F50.5° S54.3° E16 km
G50.9° S58.7° E13 km
H51.2° S57.2° E16 km
J51.6° S58.3° E18 km
K51.4° S55.9° E8 km
L52.6° S57.6° E32 km
M53.1° S59.9° E42 km
N53.6° S58.7° E11 km
R51.0° S47.5° E12 km
S52.2° S47.8° E6 km
T51.6° S51.0° E4 km
U52.0° S51.7° E5 km
W51.1° S51.9° E7 km

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References

  1. "Watt (crater)" . Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature. USGS Astrogeology Research Program.
Ewen Whitaker British astronomer

Ewen Adair Whitaker was a British-born astronomer who specialized in lunar studies. During World War II he was engaged in quality control for the lead sheathing of hollow cables strung under the English Channel as part of the "Pipe Line Under The Ocean" Project (PLUTO) to supply gasoline to Allied military vehicles in France. After the war, he obtained a position at the Royal Greenwich Observatory working on the UV spectra of stars, but became interested in lunar studies. As a sideline, Whitaker drew and published the first accurate chart of the South Polar area of the Moon in 1954, and served as director of the Lunar Section of the British Astronomical Association.

NASA space-related agency of the United States government

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.

Ben J. Bussey is an American planetary scientist.