1885 Southern Maori by-election

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The 1885 Southern Maori by-election was a by-election held on 10 June 1885 in the Southern Maori electorate during the 9th New Zealand Parliament.

The 9th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand.

The by-election was caused by the resignation of the incumbent, Hori Kerei Taiaroa, when he was re-appointed to the Legislative Council.

Hori Kerei Taiaroa New Zealand politician

Hori Kerei Taiaroa, also known as Huriwhenua, was a Māori member of the New Zealand parliament and the Paramount Chief of the southern iwi of Ngāi Tahu. The son of Ngāi Tahu leader Te Matenga Taiaroa and Mawera Taiaroa, he was born at Otakau on the Otago Peninsula in the 1830s or early 1840s.

New Zealand Legislative Council Upper House of the Parliament of New Zealand (1841 - 1951)

The Legislative Council of New Zealand existed from 1841 until 1951. When New Zealand became a colony in 1841 the Legislative Council was established as the country's first legislature; it was reconstituted as the upper house of a bicameral legislature when New Zealand became self-governing in 1852.

Taiaroa has been appointed to the Legislative Council in February 1879, but in August 1880 had been disqualified over a technicality, a cause of bitterness and resentment among Māori. When appointed by Sir George Grey Taiaroa held (and continued to hold) a salaried (government) office, hence was not eligible to sit in the Council, despite having attended three sessions. [1]

George Grey Premier of New Zealand (1877–1879)

Sir George Grey, KCB was a British soldier, explorer, colonial administrator and writer. He served in a succession of governing positions: Governor of South Australia, twice Governor of New Zealand, Governor of Cape Colony, and the 11th Premier of New Zealand.

The by-election was won by Tame Parata.

Results

1885 Southern Maori by-election [2]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent Tame Parata 14742.61
Independent Henare Paratini [3] 10430.14
Independent Hone Taare Tikao [4] 9427.25
Majority4312.46
Turnout 345

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References

  1. "The Legislative Council". Timaru Herald. 17 March 1882.
  2. "Election of Maori Representative". Otago Daily Times (7287). 25 June 1885. p. 4. Retrieved 16 January 2014.
  3. "The Southern Maori Election". The New Zealand Herald . XXII (7363). 25 June 1885. p. 5. Retrieved 16 January 2014.
  4. "Southern Maori Election". The Timaru Herald . XLI (3340). 11 June 1885. p. 3. Retrieved 16 January 2014.