1942 York state by-election

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A by-election for the seat of York in the Legislative Assembly of Western Australia was held on 21 November 1942. It was triggered by the resignation of Charles Latham (the Country Party leader and leader of the opposition) on 7 October 1942, in order to take up an appointment to the Senate. The Country Party retained the seat, with Charles Perkins winning by just 40 votes on the two-candidate-preferred count.

By-elections, also spelled bye-elections, are used to fill elected offices that have become vacant between general elections.

York was an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of Western Australia from 1890 to 1950.

Western Australian Legislative Assembly legislature of the State of Western Australia

The Western Australian Legislative Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of the Parliament of Western Australia, an Australian state. The Parliament sits in Parliament House in the Western Australian capital, Perth.

Contents

Background

Charles Latham had held York for the Country Party since the 1921 state election. He was elected party leader in 1930, and after the 1933 state election became leader of the opposition (due to the Country Party winning more seats than its coalition partner, the Nationalist Party). Latham resigned from parliament on 7 October 1942, in order to be appointed to the Senate. [1] The writ for the by-election was issued on 10 October, with the close of nominations on 29 October. Polling day was on 21 November, with the writ returned on 4 December. [2]

Charles Latham Australian politician

Sir Charles George Latham was an Australian politician born in Hythe, Kent in England.

Elections were held in the state of Western Australia on 12 March 1921 to elect all 50 members to the Legislative Assembly. The incumbent government, led by Premier James Mitchell of the Nationalist Party and supported by the Country Party and National Labor Party, won a second term in government against the Labor Party opposition, led by Opposition Leader Philip Collier.

1933 Western Australian state election

Elections were held in the state of Western Australia on 8 April 1933 to elect all 50 members to the Legislative Assembly. The one-term Nationalist-Country coalition government, led by Premier Sir James Mitchell, was defeated by the Labor Party, led by Opposition Leader Philip Collier.

Results

York state by-election, 1942
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Country Charles Perkins 59927.0–34.5
Independent John Keast47821.5–17.0
Labor Alfred Reynolds 47221.2+21.2
Independent Country Albert Noonan39617.8+17.8
Independent Labor Harry Hyams1707.7+7.7
Liberal (All-Parties)Carlyle Ferguson1074.8+4.8
Total formal votes2,22298.8–0.6
Informal votes281.2+0.6
Turnout 2,25080.3–11.7
Two-candidate-preferred result
Country Charles Perkins 1,13150.9N/A
Independent John Keast1,09149.1N/A
Country hold Swing N/A

Aftermath

Perkins held York until it was abolished at the 1950 state election, and then held Roe until his death in office in 1961. He served as a minister in the government of David Brand. [3] One of his opponents at the by-election, Labor's Alfred Reynolds, won the seat of Forrest at the 1947 state election, although he served only a single term. [4] Latham, the retiring member in York, served in the Senate for less than a year, losing his seat at the 1943 federal election. He returned to state parliament in 1946, as a member of the Legislative Council. [1]

1950 Western Australian state election

Elections were held in the state of Western Australia on 25 March 1950 to elect all 50 members to the Legislative Assembly. The Liberal-Country coalition government, led by Premier Ross McLarty, won a second term in office against the Labor Party, led by Opposition Leader Frank Wise.

Electoral district of Roe state electoral district of Western Australia

Roe is an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly of Western Australia. It takes in rural areas in the south of the state. Roe was re-created for the 2017 state election, having previously been in existence from 1950 to 1983 and from 1989 to 2008. It has a notional 16.7-point majority for the National Party against the Liberal Party, based on the results of the 2013 state election.

David Brand Australian politician; 19th Premier of Western Australia

Sir David Brand KCMG was an Australian politician. A member of the Liberal Party, he was a Member of the Legislative Assembly of Western Australia from 1945 to 1975, and also the 19th and longest-serving Premier of Western Australia, serving four terms from the 1959 to the 1971 election. He resigned as leader of the Liberal Party in 1973, and retired from politics in 1975, dying from heart disease in 1979.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Charles George Latham, Biographical Register of Members of the Parliament of Western Australia. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  2. Black, David; Prescott, Valerie (1997). Election statistics, Legislative Assembly of Western Australia, 1890-1996. Perth, Western Australia: Parliamentary History Project and Western Australian Electoral Commission. p. 363. ISBN   0-7309-8409-5.
  3. Charles Collier Perkins, Biographical Register of Members of the Parliament of Western Australia. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  4. Alfred George Reynolds, Biographical Register of Members of the Parliament of Western Australia. Retrieved 23 February 2017.