1st Congress of the Republic of Texas

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1st Congress of the Republic of Texas
2nd Congress of the Republic of Texas

Republic of Texas, Kelsey Capitol Building.png

The building that housed the House of Representatives of the Republic of Texas in Columbia (shown ca. 1897)
Overview
Jurisdiction Republic of Texas
Meeting place Columbia and Houston
Term October 3, 1836 (1836-10-03) – June 13, 1837 (1837-06-13)
House of Representatives
Members 31 Representatives
House Speaker Ira Ingram (1st session) [1]
Branch T. Archer (2nd session)
Senate
Members 14 Senators
Senate President Mirabeau Lamar
Senate President pro tem. Richard Ellis (1st session) [2]
Jesse Grimes (2nd session) [3]
Sessions
1st October 3, 1836 (1836-10-03) – December 22, 1836 (1836-12-22)
2nd May 1, 1837 (1837-05-01) – June 13, 1837 (1837-06-13)

The First Congress of the Republic of Texas, consisting of the Senate of the Republic of Texas and House of Representatives of the Republic of Texas, met in Columbia at two separate buildings (one for each chamber) and then in Houston from October 3, 1836, to June 13, 1837, during the first year of Sam Houston's presidency.

West Columbia, Texas City in Texas, United States

West Columbia is a city in Brazoria County in the U.S. state of Texas. The city is centered on the intersection of Texas Highways 35 & 36, 55 miles (89 km) southwest of downtown Houston. The population was 3,905 at the 2010 census.

Houston City in Texas, United States

Houston is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Texas and the fourth most populous city in the United States, with a census-estimated population of 2.312 million in 2017. It is the most populous city in the Southern United States and on the Gulf Coast of the United States. Located in Southeast Texas near Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, it is the seat of Harris County and the principal city of the Greater Houston metropolitan area, which is the fifth most populous metropolitan statistical area (MSA) in the United States and the second most populous in Texas after the Dallas-Fort Worth MSA. With a total area of 627 square miles (1,620 km2), Houston is the eighth most expansive city in the United States ; it is the largest city in the United States by total area, whose government is similarly not consolidated with that of a county or borough. Though primarily in Harris County, small portions of the city extend into Fort Bend and Montgomery counties.

Sam Houston nineteenth-century American statesman, politician, and soldier, namesake of Houston, Texas

Sam Houston was an American soldier and politician. An important leader of the Texas Revolution, Houston served as the 1st and 3rd president of the Republic of Texas, and was one of the first two individuals to represent Texas in the United States Senate. He also served as the 6th Governor of Tennessee and the 7th governor of Texas, the only American to be elected governor of two different states in the United States.

Contents

All members of Congress were officially non-partisan. [4] According to the Constitution of the Republic of Texas of 1836, each member of the House of Representatives was elected for a term of one year. [5] Each county was guaranteed at least one representative. [6]

The Constitution of the Republic of Texas was the supreme law of Texas from 1836 to 1845.

Each Senator was elected for a three-year term to represent a district that each had a nearly equal portion of the nation's population. Each district could have no more than one Senator.

Members

Senate

José Francisco Ruiz texan politician

José Francisco "Francis" Ruiz was a soldier, educator, politician, Republic of Texas Senator, and revolutionary.

Bexar County, Texas County in the United States

Bexar County is a county of the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 1,714,773, and a 2017 estimate put the population at 1,958,578. It is the 17th-most populous county in the nation and the fourth-most populated in Texas. Its county seat is San Antonio, the second-most populous city in Texas and the seventh-largest city in the United States.

James Thompson Collinsworth was an American-born Texian lawyer and political figure in early history of the Republic of Texas.

House of Representatives

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Resigned upon evidence presented that he was not duly elected

Standing committees

Employees

Senate

House of Representatives

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Raines, C. W. (1901). Year Book for Texas. Austin, Texas: Gammel Book Company. pp. 59–60. Retrieved March 21, 2015.
  2. 1 2 "Officers of the Senate". 1 (45) (1 ed.). Telegraph and Texas Register . December 9, 1836. p. 2. Retrieved March 21, 2015.
  3. 1 2 McDonald Spaw, Patsy (1990). The Texas Senate: Republic to Civil War, 1836-1861, Volume 1. College Station, Texas: Texas A&M University Press. p. 24. ISBN   0890964424.
  4. Erath, Lucy A. (October 1923). Barker, Eugene C.; Bolton, Herbert E., eds. "Memoirs of George Bernard Erath IV". The Southwestern Historical Quarterly. Texas State Historical Association. 27 (2): 140. Retrieved March 21, 2015.
  5. May, Janice C. (1996). The Texas State Constitution: A Reference Guide. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 4. ISBN   0313266379.
  6. Steen, Ralph W. (June 12, 2010). "Congress of the Republic of Texas". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved March 21, 2015.
  7. 1 2 "Officers of the Senate". 1 (45) (1 ed.). Telegraph and Texas Register . December 9, 1836. p. 3. Retrieved March 21, 2015.
  8. Laughlin, Charlotte (June 12, 2010). "Byars, Noah Turner". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved March 21, 2015.