2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship

Last updated
2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship
CONCACAF / FIFA Women's World Cup Qualifiers
2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship.png
Tournament details
Host countryUnited States
Dates15–26 October
Teams8 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)4 (in 4 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of the United States.svg  United States (7th title)
Runners-upFlag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica
Third placeFlag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Fourth placeFlag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
Tournament statistics
Matches played16
Goals scored65 (4.06 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of the United States.svg Abby Wambach
(7 goals)
Best player(s) Flag of the United States.svg Carli Lloyd
Best goalkeeper Flag of the United States.svg Hope Solo
Fair play awardFlag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica
2010
2018

The 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship, the ninth edition of the CONCACAF Women's Championship/Gold Cup/Women's World Cup qualifying tournament, was a women's football tournament that took place in the United States between 15 and 26 October 2014. [1] It served as CONCACAF's qualifier to the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. The top three teams qualified directly. The fourth placed team advanced to a play-off against the third placed team of the 2014 Copa América Femenina.

The CONCACAF Women's Championship, in some years called the CONCACAFWomen'sGoldCup or the CONCACAFWomen'sWorldCupqualifying, is a football competition organized by CONCACAF that often serves as the qualifying competition to the Women's World Cup. In years when the tournament has been held outside the World Cup qualifying cycle, non-CONCACAF members have been invited. CONCACAF is the governing body for football for North America, Central America and the Caribbean. The most successful country has been the United States, winning their eighth title in 2018.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, usually known as women's football or women's soccer, is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City. Most of the country is located contiguously in North America between Canada and Mexico.

Contents

The qualifying to the tournament was organized by the Central American Football Union (UNCAF) in Central America and the Caribbean Football Union (CFU) in the Caribbean and started on 19 May 2014.

Central American Football Union sports governing body

The Unión Centroamericana de Fútbol, more commonly known by the acronym UNCAF, represents the national football teams of Central America: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. Its member associations are part of CONCACAF.

Caribbean Football Union The nominal governing body for association football in the Caribbean as well as Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana.

The Caribbean Football Union (CFU) is the representative organization for football associations in the Caribbean. It represents 25 FIFA member nations, as well as 6 territories that are not affiliated to FIFA. The Union was established in January 1978 and its Member Associations compete in the CONCACAF region.

The United States and Mexico received byes into the tournament. A total of 30 teams entered qualifying, with Martinique and Guadeloupe not eligible for World Cup qualification as they are only members of CONCACAF and not FIFA. Therefore, a total of 28 teams were in contention for the three direct places plus the play-off place against CONMEBOL's Ecuador. [2] Canada did not participate as they already qualified to the World Cup as hosts.

United States womens national soccer team Womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States women's national soccer team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning four Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic gold medals, and eight CONCACAF Gold Cups. It medaled in every World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF. The United States women's national soccer team recently just won the 2019 World Cup for the 4th time by defeating Netherlands 2-0.

Mexico womens national football team womens national association football team representing Mexico

The Mexico women's national football team represents Mexico on the international stage. The squad is governed by the Mexican Football Federation and competes within CONCACAF, the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football. It has won gold medals in the Central American and Caribbean Games and a silver medal in the Pan American Games team, as well as one silver and one bronze in the Women's World Cup prior to FIFA's recognition of the women's game. When it placed second in 1971, Mexico hosted the second edition of this unofficial tournament. In addition to its senior team, Mexico fields U-20 and U-17 squads as well, with the latter having reached the final during the 2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.

The Ecuadorian women's national football team represents Ecuador in international women's football.

The United States defeated Costa Rica 6–0 in the final to win their seventh title. [3]

The Costa Rica women's national football team is controlled by the Costa Rican Football Federation. They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Central American region along with Guatemala.

Qualifying

North America

North American Football Union members Mexico and the United States gained direct entry to the final tournament. Canada did not participate as they already qualified to the World Cup as hosts.

North American Football Union

The North American Football Union (NAFU) is a regional grouping under CONCACAF of national football organizations in the North American Zone. The NAFU has no organizational structure. The statutes say "CONCACAF shall recognize ... The North American Football Union (NAFU)". The NAFU provide one of CONCACAF's representatives to the FIFA Executive Committee.

Central America

The qualification was played between 19 and 25 May.

Caribbean

The inaugural Women's Caribbean Cup served as the qualifying event. [4] Four nations advanced to the CONCACAF finals. [5] Qualifying to the Caribbean Cup took place from 23 May to 22 June. The finals were played in August 2014. [5] The group stage draw was published in April 2014. [6]

Final tournament

Eight teams were divided in two groups and play a round-robin tournament. The top two placed teams advanced to the semifinals. The losers of those semifinals played in the third place match, while the winners faced off in the final. The top three placed teams qualified directly to the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.

However, as Martinique is not a member of FIFA – since it is an overseas department of the French Republic – it is therefore not eligible to qualify. It was announced during the Final Draw on September 5 that Martinique would not be able to advance beyond the group round, and that the next best team would take their place in the semifinals should they finish in the top two in their group. [7] [8]

Venues

The tournament was played in four venues. [9]

CityStadiumCapacity
Washington Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium 45,596
Bridgeview Toyota Park 20,000
Kansas City Sporting Park 18,467
Chester PPL Park 18,500

Squads

Group stage

The teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a tie, 0 points for a loss). If tied on points, tiebreakers are applied in the following order: [8]

  1. Greater number of points in matches between the tied teams.
  2. Greater goal difference in matches between the tied teams (if more than two teams finish equal on points).
  3. Greater number of goals scored in matches among the tied teams (if more than two teams finish equal on points).
  4. Greater goal difference in all group matches.
  5. Greater number of goals scored in all group matches.
  6. Drawing of lots.

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States (H)3300120+129 Knockout stage
2Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 320132+16
3Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti 31021763
4Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 30031870
Source: CONCACAF
(H) Host.
Guatemala  Flag of Guatemala.svg0–1Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti
Report Zullo Soccerball shade.svg 69'
Sporting Park, Kansas City
Referee: Quetzalli Alvarado (Mexico)
United States  Flag of the United States.svg1–0Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
Wambach Soccerball shade.svg 55' Report
Sporting Park, Kansas City
Referee: Marianela Araya (Costa Rica)

Haiti  Flag of Haiti.svg0–1Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
Report Cordner Soccerball shade.svg 37'
Toyota Park, Bridgeview
Referee: Sheena Dickson (Canada)
United States  Flag of the United States.svg5–0Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala
Heath Soccerball shade.svg 7', 57'
Lloyd Soccerball shade.svg 46'
Engen Soccerball shade.svg 58'
Rapinoe Soccerball shade.svg 66'
Report
Toyota Park, Bridgeview
Referee: Maurees Skeete (Guyana)

Trinidad and Tobago  Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg2–1Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala
Cordner Soccerball shade.svg 74'
Johnson Soccerball shade.svg 83' (pen.)
Report M. Monterroso Soccerball shade.svg 90'
RFK Stadium, Washington
Referee: Lucila Venegas (Mexico)
Haiti  Flag of Haiti.svg0–6Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report Lloyd Soccerball shade.svg 15'
Wambach Soccerball shade.svg 39', 61'
Klingenberg Soccerball shade.svg 57'
Press Soccerball shade.svg 65'
Brian Soccerball shade.svg 82'
RFK Stadium, Washington
Referee: Quetzalli Alvarado (Mexico)

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 330092+79 Knockout stage
2Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 3201132+116
3Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 310285+33
4Snake Flag of Martinique.svg  Martinique [lower-alpha 1] 3003122210
Source: CONCACAF
Notes:
  1. Martinique was not able to qualify past the group stage. The next best team in the group would have taken their place if they had finished the group stage in a qualifying position. [11]
Jamaica  Flag of Jamaica.svg6–0Snake Flag of Martinique.svg  Martinique
Murray Soccerball shade.svg 2', 74'
Duncan Soccerball shade.svg 6'
Henry Soccerball shade.svg 22', 77'
Allen Soccerball shade.svg 71'
Report
Sporting Park, Kansas City
Referee: Melissa Borjas (Honduras)
Costa Rica  Flag of Costa Rica.svg1–0Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Venegas Soccerball shade.svg 8' Report
Sporting Park, Kansas City
Referee: Carol-Anne Chenard (Canada)

Costa Rica  Flag of Costa Rica.svg2–1Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Cruz Traña Soccerball shade.svg 76'
Cedeño Soccerball shade.svg 86'
Report Duncan Soccerball shade.svg 77'
Toyota Park, Bridgeview
Referee: Margaret Domka (United States)
Martinique  Snake Flag of Martinique.svg0–10Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Report Samarzich Soccerball shade.svg 6'
Duarte Soccerball shade.svg 28', 49'
Mayor Soccerball shade.svg 34'
Guillou Soccerball shade.svg 36' (o.g.)
Garciamendez Soccerball shade.svg 40'
Garza Soccerball shade.svg 58'
Ocampo Soccerball shade.svg 75', 87'
Noyola Soccerball shade.svg 90+2'
Toyota Park, Bridgeview
Referee: Tatiana Guzman (Nicaragua)

Martinique  Snake Flag of Martinique.svg1–6Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica
Carin Soccerball shade.svg 62' Report Sanchez Soccerball shade.svg 7'
Venegas Soccerball shade.svg 25', 90'
Acosta Soccerball shade.svg 32'
Cedeño Soccerball shade.svg 81', 83'
RFK Stadium, Washington
Referee: Carol-Anne Chenard (Canada)
Mexico  Flag of Mexico.svg3–1Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Mayor Soccerball shade.svg 29'
Corral Soccerball shade.svg 59', 76'
Report Henry Soccerball shade.svg 14'
RFK Stadium, Washington
Referee: Mirian Leon (El Salvador)

Knockout stage

In the knockout stage, if a match is level at the end of normal playing time, extra time is played (two periods of 15 minutes each) and followed, if necessary, by penalty shoot-out to determine the winner. [12] The top three teams qualified directly to the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. The fourth placed team advanced to a play-off against the third placed team of the 2014 Copa América Femenina.

Bracket

 
SemifinalsFinal
 
      
 
24 October
 
 
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica (pen.)1 (3)
 
26 October
 
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 1 (0)
 
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 0
 
24 October
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 6
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3
 
 
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 0
 
Third place match
 
 
26 October
 
 
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 2
 
 
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico (a.e.t.)4

Semifinals

Costa Rica  Flag of Costa Rica.svg1–1 (a.e.t.)Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
Venegas Soccerball shade.svg 19' Report Hutchinson Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Penalties
Alvarado Soccerball shad check.svg
Sánchez Soccerball shad check.svg
Acosta Soccerball shad check.svg
3–0Soccerball shade cross.svg Johnson
Soccerball shade cross.svg Hutchinson
Soccerball shade cross.svg Shade
PPL Park, Chester
Referee: Melissa Borjas (Honduras)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg3–0Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Lloyd Soccerball shade.svg 6', 30' (pen.)
Press Soccerball shade.svg 56'
Report
PPL Park, Chester
Referee: Sheena Dickson (Canada)

Third place match

Trinidad and Tobago  Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg2–4 (a.e.t.)Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Cordner Soccerball shade.svg 57'
Shade Soccerball shade.svg 78'
Report Mayor Soccerball shade.svg 24'
Ocampo Soccerball shade.svg 79'
Corral Soccerball shade.svg 104', 106'
PPL Park, Chester
Referee: Carol-Anne Chenard (Canada)

Final

Costa Rica  Flag of Costa Rica.svg0–6Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report Wambach Soccerball shade.svg 4', 35', 41', 71'
Lloyd Soccerball shade.svg 18'
Leroux Soccerball shade.svg 73'
PPL Park, Chester
Referee: Lucila Venegas (Mexico)
 2014 CONCACAF Champions 
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Seventh title

Awards

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament. [13]

AwardPlayer
Golden Ball Flag of the United States.svg Carli Lloyd
Golden Boot Flag of the United States.svg Abby Wambach
Golden Gloves Flag of the United States.svg Hope Solo
Fair Play AwardFlag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica
All-star team
GoalkeepersDefendersMidfieldersForwards

Flag of the United States.svg Hope Solo

Flag of Costa Rica.svg Diana Saenz
Flag of the United States.svg Christie Rampone
Flag of the United States.svg Whitney Engen
Flag of the United States.svg Meghan Klingenberg

Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Kennya Cordner
Flag of the United States.svg Carli Lloyd
Flag of Costa Rica.svg Shirley Cruz Traña
Flag of the United States.svg Christen Press

Flag of the United States.svg Abby Wambach
Flag of Mexico.svg Charlyn Corral

Goalscorers

7 goals
5 goals
4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
1 own goal

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