Adrien Sibomana

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Adrien Sibomana Adrien Sibomana - 1991.jpg
Adrien Sibomana

Adrien Sibomana (born 4 September 1953, in Bukeye, Muramvya) was the prime minister of Burundi from 19 October 1988 until 10 July 1993. He was a member of UPRONA. He is an ethnic Hutu and was appointed by the Tutsi President Pierre Buyoya in an unsuccessful attempt to appease Hutus by giving a few high government posts to them. [1] Sibomana was the first Hutu prime minister since 1973 and previously had been governor of Muramvya Province. [2]

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References

  1. "Burundi's Majority Hutu Get Equal Cabinet Role". The Washington Post . 1988-10-21. Archived from the original on 2012-11-04. Retrieved 2010-08-16.
  2. "A Hutu Is Appointed Burundi Prime Minister". The New York Times . 1988-10-20. Retrieved 2010-08-16.
Political offices
Preceded by
Édouard Nzambimana
Prime Minister of Burundi
1988–1993
Succeeded by
Sylvie Kinigi