Apoyando

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Apoyando is a method of plucking used in both classical guitar and flamenco guitar known in English as 'rest stroke' (though the direct translation of 'apoyando' would be "supporting"). Rest stroke gets its name because after plucking the string, the finger rests on the adjacent string after it follows through, giving a slightly rounder, often punchier sound (contrasted with tirando).

Flamenco guitar acoustic guitar

A flamenco guitar is a guitar similar to a classical guitar but with thinner tops and less internal bracing. It is used in toque, the guitar-playing part of the art of flamenco.

Tirando is a method of plucking used in classical guitar and flamenco guitar. Tirando is Spanish for "pulling". After plucking, the finger does not touch the string that is next lowest in pitch on the guitar, as it does with apoyando.


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