Athletics at the 1988 Summer Olympics – Men's 400 metres hurdles

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Men's 400 metres hurdles
at the Games of the XXIV Olympiad
The Soviet Union 1988 CPA 5959 stamp (Games of the XXIV Olympiad Seoul '1988. Long jump).jpg
Soviet stamp commemorating 1988 Olympic athletics
Venue Olympic Stadium
Dates23 September 1988 (quarterfinals)
24 September 1988 (semifinals)
25 September 1988 (final)
Competitors38 from 28 nations
Winning time47.19 OR
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Andre Phillips
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Amadou Dia Ba
Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal
Bronze medal icon.svg Edwin Moses
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
  1984
1992  

The men's 400 metres hurdles at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea had an entry list of 38 competitors, with five qualifying heats (38 runners) and two semifinals (16) before the final (8) took place on Sunday September 25, 1988. [1] One athlete did not start, so there were 37 competitors from 28 nations. [2] The maximum number of athletes per nation had been set at 3 since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Andre Phillips of the United States, the nation's second consecutive and 14th overall victory in the event. Amadou Dia Ba earned Senegal's first medal in the event with his silver. Dia Ba broke up a potential American sweep, as 1976 and 1984 champion Edwin Moses took bronze and Kevin Young placed fourth. Moses was the second man to earn three medals in the event (after Morgan Taylor from 1924 to 1932).

Contents

Background

This was the 19th time the event was held. It had been introduced along with the men's 200 metres hurdles in 1900, with the 200 being dropped after 1904 and the 400 being held through 1908 before being left off the 1912 programme. However, when the Olympics returned in 1920 after World War I, the men's 400 metres hurdles was back and would continue to be contested at every Games thereafter.

Three of the eight finalists from the 1984 Games returned: gold medalist (and 1976 champion) Edwin Moses of the United States, bronze medalist Harald Schmid of West Germany, and fifth-place finisher Amadou Dia Bâ of Senegal. Fourth-place finisher Sven Nylander of Sweden was entered but did not start. Moses had won over 100 consecutive finals in nearly 10 years starting in August 1977, but had finally been beaten in June 1987. No longer unbeatable, Moses had still won the 1987 World Championships and the 1988 U.S. Olympic trials—both very strong fields. [2]

Barbados, Fiji, Honduras, Nepal, Sierra Leone, and South Korea each made their debut in the event. The United States made its 18th appearance, most of any nation, having missed only the boycotted 1980 Games.

Competition format

The competition used the three-round format used every Games since 1908 (except the four-round competition in 1952): quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. Ten sets of hurdles were set on the course. The hurdles were 3 feet (91.5 centimetres) tall and were placed 35 metres apart beginning 45 metres from the starting line, resulting in a 40 metres home stretch after the last hurdle. The 400 metres track was standard.

There were 5 quarterfinal heats with between 7 and 8 athletes each. The top 3 men in each quarterfinal advanced to the semifinals along with the next fastest 1 overall. The 16 semifinalists were divided into 2 semifinals of 8 athletes each, with the top 4 in each semifinal advancing to the 8-man final. [2]

Records

These were the standing world and Olympic records (in seconds) prior to the 1988 Summer Olympics.

World recordFlag of the United States.svg  Edwin Moses  (USA)47.02 Koblenz, West Germany 31 August 1983
Olympic recordFlag of the United States.svg  Edwin Moses  (USA)47.64 Montreal, Canada 25 July 1976

Andre Phillips set a new Olympic record in the final with a time of 47.19 seconds.

Schedule

All times are Korea Standard Time adjusted for daylight savings (UTC+10)

DateTimeRound
Friday, 23 September 198811:10Quarterfinals
Saturday, 24 September 198816:00Semifinals
Sunday, 25 September 198813:35Final

Results

Quarterfinals

The quarterfinals were held on Friday September 23, 1988.

Quarterfinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Amadou Dia Ba Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 49.41Q
2 Klaus Ehrle Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 50.10Q
3 John Graham Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 50.30Q
4 Hwang Hong-Chul Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg  South Korea 50.52
5 Philip Harries Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 50.81
6 Jasem Aldowaila Flag of Kuwait.svg  Kuwait 51.87
7 Dambar Kunwar Flag of Nepal.svg  Nepal 56.80
Sven Nylander Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden DNS

Quarterfinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Harald Schmid Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 49.77Q
2 Simon Kitur Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 49.88Q
3 Alain Cuypers Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 50.42Q
4 Ahmed Ghanem Flag of Egypt.svg  Egypt 50.44
5 Ryoichi Yoshida Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 50.49
6 Samuel Matete Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia 51.06
7 Domingo Cordero Flag of Puerto Rico (1952-1995).svg  Puerto Rico 51.26
8 Jorge Fidel Ponce Flag of Honduras.svg  Honduras 55.38

Quarterfinal 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Edwin Moses Flag of the United States.svg  United States 49.38Q
2 Edgar Itt Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 50.10Q
3 José Alonso Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 50.12Q
4 Leigh Miller Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 50.53
5 Branislav Karaulić Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 51.32
6 Allan Ince Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 52.76
7 Oral Selkridge Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda 53.44

Quarterfinal 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Kevin Young Flag of the United States.svg  United States 49.35Q
2 Kriss Akabusi Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 49.62Q
3 Gideon Yego Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 49.80Q
4 Jozef Kucej Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 49.89
5 Rok Kopitar Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 50.54
6 Hamidou M'Baye Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 50.58
7 Benjamin Grant Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Sierra Leone 51.73
8 Joseph Rodan Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 53.66

Quarterfinal 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Andre Phillips Flag of the United States.svg  United States 49.34Q
2 Winthrop Graham Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 49.40Q
3 Joseph Maritim Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 49.64Q
4 Toma Tomov Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria 49.66q
5 Max Robertson Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 50.67
6 Ahmed Hamada Jassim Flag of Bahrain (1972-2002).svg  Bahrain 51.34
7 Yousif Al-Dossary Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia 53.51

Semifinals

The semifinals were held on Saturday September 24, 1988.

Semifinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotesLANE
13 Edwin Moses Flag of the United States.svg  United States 47.89Q
25 Kevin Young Flag of the United States.svg  United States 48.56Q
31 Harald Schmid Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 48.93Q
46 Kriss Akabusi Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 49.22Q
54 Joseph Maritim Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 49.50
68 José Alonso Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 49.57
72 Klaus Ehrle Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 51.04
87 John Graham Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 51.33

Semifinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotesLANE
15 Andre Phillips Flag of the United States.svg  United States 48.19Q
26 Winthrop Graham Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 48.37Q
34 Amadou Dia Ba Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 48.48Q
42 Edgar Itt Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 48.86Q
53 Toma Tomov Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria 48.90
61 Simon Kitur Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 49.74
77 Alain Cuypers Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 49.75
8 Gideon Yego Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya DSQ

Final

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg6 Andre Phillips Flag of the United States.svg  United States 47.19 OR
Silver medal icon.svg5 Amadou Dia Ba Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 47.23NR
Bronze medal icon.svg3 Edwin Moses Flag of the United States.svg  United States 47.56
42 Kevin Young Flag of the United States.svg  United States 47.94
54 Winthrop Graham Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 48.04
67 Kriss Akabusi Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 48.69
71 Harald Schmid Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 48.76
88 Edgar Itt Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 48.78

Results summary

RankAthleteNationQuarterfinalsSemifinalsFinalNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Andre Phillips Flag of the United States.svg  United States 49.3448.1947.19 OR
Silver medal icon.svg Amadou Dia Ba Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 49.4148.4847.23NR
Bronze medal icon.svg Edwin Moses Flag of the United States.svg  United States 49.3847.8947.56
4 Kevin Young Flag of the United States.svg  United States 49.3548.5647.94
5 Winthrop Graham Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 49.4048.3748.04
6 Kriss Akabusi Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 49.6249.2248.69
7 Harald Schmid Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 49.7748.9348.76
8 Edgar Itt Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 50.1048.8648.78
9 Toma Tomov Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria 49.6648.90Did not advance
10 Joseph Maritim Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 49.6449.50
11 José Alonso Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 50.1249.57
12 Simon Kitur Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 49.8849.74
13 Alain Cuypers Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 50.4249.75
14 Klaus Ehrle Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 50.1051.04
15 John Graham Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 50.3051.33
16 Gideon Yego Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 49.80DSQ
17 Jozef Kucej Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 49.89Did not advance
18 Ahmed Ghanem Flag of Egypt.svg  Egypt 50.44
19 Ryoichi Yoshida Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 50.49
20 Hwang Hong-Chul Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg  South Korea 50.52
21 Leigh Miller Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 50.53
22 Rok Kopitar Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 50.54
23 Hamidou M'Baye Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 50.58
24 Max Robertson Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 50.67
25 Philip Harries Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 50.81
26 Samuel Matete Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia 51.06
27 Domingo Cordero Flag of Puerto Rico (1952-1995).svg  Puerto Rico 51.26
28 Branislav Karaulić Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 51.32
29 Ahmed Hamada Jassim Flag of Bahrain (1972-2002).svg  Bahrain 51.34
30 Benjamin Grant Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Sierra Leone 51.73
31 Jasem Aldowaila Flag of Kuwait.svg  Kuwait 51.87
32 Allan Ince Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 52.76
33 Oral Selkridge Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda 53.44
34 Yousif Al-Dossary Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia 53.51
35 Joseph Rodan Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 53.66
36 Jorge Fidel Ponce Flag of Honduras.svg  Honduras 55.38
37 Dambar Kunwar Flag of Nepal.svg  Nepal 56.80
Sven Nylander Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden DNS

See also

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1988 Seoul Summer Games: Men's 400 metres Hurdles". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 7 October 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 "400 metres Hurdles, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 19 January 2021.