Baron Stourton

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Arms of Stourton: Sable, a bend or between six fountains Arms of Stourton.svg
Arms of Stourton: Sable, a bend or between six fountains
Quartered arms of Stourton, Baron Mowbray, Segrave and Stourton: quarterly of six: *1st: Sable, a bend or between six fountains (Stourton); *2nd: Gules, on a bend between six cross-crosslets fitchy argent an escutcheon or charged with a demi-lion rampant pierced through the mouth by an arrow within a double tressure flory counterflory of the first (Howard); *3rd: Gules, a lion rampant argent (Mowbray); *4th: Sable, a lion rampant argent ducally crowned or (Segrave);
*5th: Gules, three lions passant guardant in pale or armed and langued azure a label of three points argent (Plantagenet (Thomas of Brotherton, 1st Earl of Norfolk)); *6th Gules, a lion rampant within a bordure engrailed or (Talbot) Mowbray3.svg
Quartered arms of Stourton, Baron Mowbray, Segrave and Stourton: quarterly of six: *1st: Sable, a bend or between six fountains (Stourton); *2nd: Gules, on a bend between six cross-crosslets fitchy argent an escutcheon or charged with a demi-lion rampant pierced through the mouth by an arrow within a double tressure flory counterflory of the first (Howard); *3rd: Gules, a lion rampant argent (Mowbray); *4th: Sable, a lion rampant argent ducally crowned or (Segrave);
*5th: Gules, three lions passant guardant in pale or armed and langued azure a label of three points argent (Plantagenet (Thomas of Brotherton, 1st Earl of Norfolk)); *6th Gules, a lion rampant within a bordure engrailed or (Talbot)

Baron Stourton is a title in the Peerage of England, It was created by patent in 1448 for John Stourton. [2] In 1878, the ancient barony of Mowbray was called out of abeyance in favour of the twentieth Baron Stourton. About two weeks later, the barony of Segrave was also called out of abeyance in his favour. Thereafter, the three baronies remained united. The formal title is Baron Mowbray, Segrave and Stourton. [3]

Contents

The family seat, until 1717, was Stourhead.

The motto of the family is "Loyal je serai durant ma vie" (French: I will be loyal throughout my life). [3]

As well as the coat of arms, the Stourton family has a heraldic badge: A drag (or sledge) or. [3]

Barons Stourton (1448)

See also

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References

  1. Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p. 807, Baron Mowbray
  2. Sharpe, John (ed.). Sharpe's Peerage of the British Empire exhibiting its present state and deducing the existing descents from the ancient nobility of England, Scotland and Ireland (1830). p. 5X5.
  3. 1 2 3 Townend, Peter (ed.). Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage (103rd Edition). Burke's Peerage Limited. pp. 1752–1753.