Battle of Jianwei

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Battle of Jianwei
Part of the third of Zhuge Liang's Northern Expeditions
Zhuge Liang 3rd Northern Expedition.png
The third of Zhuge Liang's northern expeditions
DateFebruary – May 229 [1]
Location
Result Shu Han victory
Territorial
changes
Wudu and Yinping commanderies captured by Shu
Belligerents
Cao Wei Shu Han
Commanders and leaders
Guo Huai Zhuge Liang
Chen Shi

"The fault at the battle of Jieting lay with Ma Su, but you held yourself responsible and demoted yourself drastically. Respecting your wishes, I complied with your principle. In the past year, you made our army illustrious and beheaded Wang Shuang. In the present year you led a campaign and put Guo Huai to flight, won the Di and the Qiang over to us, restored the two jun; your prowess has shaken the lawless, your achievements have become pre-eminent. At present, the Empire is in disorder and the chief criminal is not yet decapitated. To allow you, who are entrusted with a great work and important business of state, to remain demoted for a long time is not the way to glorify grand merit. I now reinstate you as chengxiang; do not refuse it." [3] [6]

Following this battle, Cao Wei's state would launch their own campaign the next year called the Ziwu Campaign. [3] [7]

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References

  1. Zizhi Tongjian vol. 71.
  2. ([建興]七年,亮遣陳戒攻武都、陰平。) Sanguozhi vol. 35.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Sima (1084), vol. 71.
  4. (魏雍州刺史郭淮率衆欲擊戒,亮自出至建威, ...) Sanguozhi vol. 35.
  5. (... 淮退還,遂平二郡。) Sanguozhi vol. 35.
  6. (詔策亮曰:「街亭之役,咎由馬謖,而君引愆,深自貶抑,重違君意,聽順所守。前年耀師,馘斬王雙;今歲爰征,郭淮遁走;降集氐、羌,興復二郡,威鎮凶暴,功勳顯然。方今天下騷擾,元惡未梟,君受大任,幹國之重,而乆自挹損,非所以光揚洪烈矣。今復君丞相,君其勿辭。」) Sanguozhi vol. 35.
  7. (真當發西討,帝親臨送。) Sanguozhi vol. 9.

Battle of Jianwei
Traditional Chinese 建威之戰
Simplified Chinese 建威之战