Tianshui revolts

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Tianshui revolts
Part of the first of Zhuge Liang's Northern Expeditions
Long Corridor-Jiang Wei .JPG
Jiang Wei surrenders to Zhuge Liang. Portrait in the Long Corridor of the Summer Palace, Beijing
Datec. February – May 228 [1]
Location
Result Territorial losses to Shu were retaken by Wei later; Overall stalemate
Belligerents
Shu Han Cao Wei
Commanders and leaders
Zhuge Liang
Zhao Yun
Deng Zhi
Cao Zhen
Zhang He
Strength
>60,000[ citation needed ] >50,000[ citation needed ]
Casualties and losses
Unknown Unknown
  1. Zizhi Tongjian vol. 71.
  2. (南安、天水、安定郡反應亮,郃皆破平之。) Sanguozhi vol. 17.

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References


Tianshui revolts
Traditional Chinese 天水之亂
Simplified Chinese 天水之乱