Xincheng Rebellion

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Xincheng Rebellion
Part of the wars of the Three Kingdoms period
Defeat of Meng Da.jpg
An illustration of Meng Da being slain by Sima Yi's men
Datec. December 227 [lower-alpha 1] c. March 228 CE [lower-alpha 2]
Location
Xincheng Commandery (covering present-day Fang County, Zhuxi County and Zhushan County in Shiyan, and Baokang County and Nanzhang County in Xiangyang, all located in northwestern Hubei province)
Result Cao Wei victory; rebellion suppressed
Territorial
changes
Xincheng retaken by Cao Wei
Belligerents
Cao Wei Meng Da
(with some support from Shu Han and Eastern Wu)
Commanders and leaders
Sima Yi   Skull and Crossbones.svg Meng Da
  1. The rebellion started in the 12th lunar month of the 1st year of the Taihe era in Cao Rui's reign. [1] This month corresponds to 26 December 227 to 24 January 228 in the Gregorian calendar.
  2. The rebellion ended in the 1st lunar month of the 2nd year of the Taihe era in Cao Rui's reign. [2] This month corresponds to 23 February to 23 March 228 in the Gregorian calendar.
  3. In late 220, some months after the death of his father Cao Cao, Cao Pi forced Emperor Xian (the last ruler of the Eastern Han dynasty) to abdicate the throne to him. He then proclaimed himself emperor and established the state of Cao Wei, marking the start of the Three Kingdoms period.
  4. Meng Da initially served Liu Zhang, a warlord in Yi Province (covering present-day Sichuan and Chongqing). He surrendered to Liu Bei in 214 after the latter seized control of Yi Province from Liu Zhang, and served under Liu Bei for about five years before defecting to Cao Pi. Zhuge Liang perceived Meng Da as an untrustworthy person who would switch his allegiances easily.

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References

  1. 1 2 Quote from Sanguozhi vol. 3: (太和元年 ... 十二月, ... 新城太守孟達反,詔驃騎將軍司馬宣王討之。)
  2. 1 2 Quote from Sanguozhi vol. 3: ([太和]二年春正月,宣王攻破新城,斬達,傳其首。)
  3. (魏略曰:達以延康元年率部曲四千餘家歸魏。文帝時初即王位,既宿知有達,聞其來,甚悅,令貴臣有識察者往觀之,還曰「將帥之才也」,或曰「卿相之器也」,王益欽達。 ... 又加拜散騎常侍,領新城太守,委以西南之任。) Weilüe annotation in Sanguozhi vol. 3.
  4. (時眾臣或以為待之太猥,又不宜委以方任。 ...) Weilüe annotation in Sanguozhi vol. 3.
  5. (太和元年六月,天子詔帝屯于宛,加督荊、豫二州諸軍事。) Jin Shu vol. 1.
  6. (初,蜀將孟達之降也,魏朝遇之甚厚。帝以達言行傾巧不可任,驟諫不見聽,乃以達領新城太守,封侯,假節。) Jin Shu vol. 1.
  7. (達既為文帝所寵,又與桓階、夏侯尚親善,及文帝崩,時桓、尚皆卒,達自以羈旅久在疆埸,心不自安。) Weilüe annotation in Sanguozhi vol. 3.
  8. (達於是連吳固蜀,潛圖中國。蜀相諸葛亮惡其反覆,又慮其為患。) Jin Shu vol. 1.
  9. (諸葛亮聞之,陰欲誘達,數書招之,達與相報答。魏興太守申儀與達有隙,密表達與蜀潛通,帝未之信也。司馬宣王遣參軍梁幾察之,又勸其入朝。達驚懼,遂反。) Weilüe annotation in Sanguozhi vol. 3.
  10. (達與魏興太守申儀有隙,亮欲促其事,乃遣郭模詐降,過儀,因漏泄其謀。達聞其謀漏泄,將舉兵。帝恐達速發,以書喻之曰:「將軍昔棄劉備,託身國家,國家委將軍以疆埸之任,任將軍以圖蜀之事,可謂心貫白日。蜀人愚智,莫不切齒於將軍。諸葛亮欲相破,惟苦無路耳。模之所言,非小事也,亮豈輕之而令宣露,此殆易知耳。」達得書大喜,猶與不決。帝乃潛軍進討。諸將言達與二賊交構,宜觀望而後動。帝曰:「達無信義,此其相疑之時也,當及其未定促決之。」乃倍道兼行,八日到其城下。) Jin Shu vol. 1.
  11. (吳蜀各遣其將向西城安橋、木闌塞以救達,帝分諸將以距之。) Jin Shu vol. 1.
  12. (初,達與亮書曰:「宛去洛八百里,去吾一千二百里,聞吾舉事,當表上天子,比相反覆,一月間也,則吾城已固,諸軍足辦。則吾所在深險,司馬公必不自來;諸將來,吾無患矣。」及兵到,達又告亮曰:「吾舉事八日,而兵至城下,何其神速也!」上庸城三面阻水,達於城外為木柵以自固。帝渡水,破其柵,直造城下。八道攻之,旬有六日,達甥鄧賢、將李輔等開門出降。斬達,傳首京師。) Jin Shu vol. 1.
  13. (二年春正月,宣王攻破新城,斬達,傳其首。) Sanguozhi vol. 3.
  14. (魏略曰:宣王誘達將李輔及達甥鄧賢,賢等開門納軍。達被圍旬有六日而敗,焚其首於洛陽四達之衢。) Weilüe annotation in Sanguozhi vol. 3.
  15. (俘獲萬餘人,振旅還于宛。) Jin Shu vol. 1.
  16. (初,申儀久在魏興,專威疆埸,輒承制刻印,多所假授。達既誅,有自疑心。時諸郡守以帝新克捷,奉禮求賀,皆聽之。帝使人諷儀,儀至,問承制狀,執之, ...) Jin Shu vol. 1.
  17. (又徙孟達餘衆七千餘家于幽州。蜀將姚靜、鄭他等帥其屬七千餘人來降。) Jin Shu vol. 1.
  18. Zizhi Tongjian vol. 71.
  19. (... 歸于京師。 ... 屬帝朝于京師,天子訪之於帝。 ... 天子並然之,復命帝屯于宛。) Jin Shu vol. 1.
  20. (卻說孟達在新城,約下金城太守申儀、上庸太守申耽,剋日舉事。 ... 達奪路而走,申耽趕來。達人困馬乏,措手不及,被申耽一鎗刺於馬下,梟其首級。餘軍皆降。李輔、鄧賢大開城門,迎接司馬懿入城。撫民勞軍已畢,遂遣人奏知魏主曹叡。叡大喜,教將孟達首級去洛陽城市示眾;加申耽、申儀官職,就隨司馬懿征進;命李輔、鄧賢守新城、上庸。) Sanguo Yanyi ch. 94.
  21. (太和元年薨,諡曰壯侯。) Sanguozhi vol. 17.

Xincheng Rebellion
Traditional Chinese 新城之亂
Simplified Chinese 新城之乱