Cat (zodiac)

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The Cat is the fourth animal symbol in the 12-year cycle of the Vietnamese zodiac and Gurung zodiac, taking place of the Rabbit in the Chinese zodiac. [1] As such, the traits associated with the Rabbit are attributed to the Cat. Cats are in conflict with the Rat.

Contents

Legends relating to the order of the Chinese zodiac often include stories as to why the cat was not included among the twelve. Because the Rat tricked the cat into missing the banquet with the Jade Emperor, the cat was not included and was not aware that the banquet was going on and was not given a year, thus began the antipathy between cats and rats. It is possible domesticated cats had not proliferated through China at the zodiac's induction. [2]

Another legend known as "The Great Race" tells that all the animals in the zodiac were headed to the Jade Emperor. The Cat and Rat were the most intelligent of the animals, however they were both also poor swimmers and came across a river. They both tricked the kind, naive Ox to assist them by letting them ride on its back over the river. As the Ox was approaching the other side of the river, the Rat pushed the Cat into the river, then jumped off the Ox and rushed to the Jade Emperor, becoming the first in the zodiac. All the other animals made it to the Jade Emperor, while the Cat was left to drown in the river after being sabotaged by the Rat. It is said that this is also the reason cats always hunt Rats.

There have been various explanations of why the Vietnamese, unlike all other countries who follow the Sino lunar calendar, have the cat instead of the Rabbit as a zodiac animal. The most common explanation is that the ancient word for "rabbit" (mao) sounds like "cat" (meo). [3]

Years and the Five Elements

People born within the date ranges below can be said to have been born under the "Year of the Cat", instead of "Year of the Rabbit". [4] [5]

A mummified cat Louvre egyptologie 21.jpg
A mummified cat
Start dateEnd dateHeavenly branch
29 January 190315 February 1904 Water Cat
14 February 19153 February 1916 Wood Cat
2 February 192722 January 1928 Fire Cat
19 February 19397 February 1940 Earth Cat
6 February 195126 January 1952 Metal Cat
25 January 196312 February 1964 Water Cat
11 February 197530 January 1976 Wood Cat
29 January 198716 February 1988 Fire Cat
16 February 19994 February 2000 Earth Cat
11 February 201122 January 2012 Metal Cat
22 January 20239 February 2024 Water Cat
8 February 203527 January 2036 Wood Cat
26 January 204713 February 2048 Fire Cat
11 February 20591 February 2060 Earth Cat
31 January 207118 February 2072 Metal Cat
17 February 20835 February 2084 Water Cat
5 February 209524 January 2096 Wood Cat
A cat lying on rice straw Felis silvestris catus lying on rice straw.jpg
A cat lying on rice straw

Vietnamese zodiac Cat

SignBest MatchAverageNo Match
Cat Pig, Goat, Cat, Dog, Tiger, Horse, Dragon, Monkey, Snake, Ox Rooster & Rat

Basic astrology elements

Earthly Branches of Birth Year:Tree
The Five Elements: Wood
Yin Yang:Yin
Lunar Month:Second
Lucky Numbers:3, 6, 9; Avoid: 1, 7, 8
Lucky Flowers: flower of fragrant plantain lily, nerve plant, snapdragon
Lucky Colors:black, pink, purple, blue, red; Avoid: brown, yellow, white
Season:Spring

See also

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References

  1. "Tamu (Gurung) Losar Festival". Archived from the original on 2017-07-29. Retrieved 2017-01-09.
  2. "Why no year of the Cat?".
  3. "Year of the Cat OR Year of the Rabbit?". www.nwasianweekly.com. Retrieved 2016-02-23.
  4. "When is Chinese New Year?". pinyin.info. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  5. "Chinese Zodiac - Rabbit (Hare)". Your Chinese Astrology. Retrieved 13 March 2018.