Dog (zodiac)

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Dog 2.svg
Chinese paper cutting DogYearPaperCutting.jpg
Chinese paper cutting

The Dog ( ) is eleventh of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Dog is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol . The character , also refers to the actual animal while , also refers to the zodiac animal.

Contents

Years and the Five Elements

People born within these date ranges can be said to have been born in the "Year of the Dog", while also bearing the following elemental sign: [1]

Start dateEnd dateHeavenly branch
10 February 191029 January 1911 Metal Dog
28 January 192215 February 1923 Water Dog
14 February 19343 February 1935 Wood Dog
2 February 194621 January 1947 Fire Dog
18 February 19587 February 1959 Earth Dog
6 February 197026 January 1971 Metal Dog
25 January 198212 February 1983 Water Dog
10 February 199430 January 1995 Wood Dog
29 January 200617 February 2007 Fire Dog
16 February 20184 February 2019 Earth Dog
2 February 203022 January 2031 Metal Dog
22 January 20429 February 2043 Water Dog
8 February 205427 January 2055 Wood Dog
26 January 206613 February 2067 Fire Dog
12 February 20781 February 2079 Earth Dog
30 January 209017 February 2091 Metal Dog
17 February 21026 February 2103 Water Dog

Basic astrology elements

Earthly Branches of Birth Year:戌 Xu
The Five Elements: Earth
Yin Yang:Yang
Lunar Month:Ninth
Lucky Numbers:3, 4, 9; Avoid: 1, 6, 7
Lucky Flowers: rose, oncidium, cymbidium, orchid
Lucky Colors:green, red, purple; Avoid: blue, white, gold
Season:Autumn
Closest Western Zodiac: Libra

2018

In the sexagenary cycle, 2018 (16 February 2018–4 February 2019, and every 60-year multiple before and after), is the Celestial stem/Earthly Branch year indicated by the characters 戊戌. For the 2018 Year of the Dog, many countries and regions issued lunar new year stamps. These included countries where the holiday is traditionally observed as well as countries in the Americas, Africa, Europe and Oceania. The USC U.S.-China Institute created a web collection of more than one hundred of these stamps. [2]

See also

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Horse (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Horse (⾺) is the seventh of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. There is a long tradition of the Horse in Chinese mythology. Certain characteristics of the Horse nature are supposed to be typical of or to be associated with either a year of the Horse and its events, or in regard to the personality of someone born in such a year. Horse aspects can also enter by other chronomantic factors or measures, such as hourly.

Pig (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Pig (豬) is the twelfth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in Chinese zodiac, in relation to the Chinese calendar and system of horology, and paralleling the system of ten Heavenly Stems and twelve Earthly Branches. Although the term "zodiac" is used in the phrase "Chinese zodiac", there is a major difference between the Chinese usage and Western astrology: the zodiacal animals do not relate to the zodiac as the area of the sky that extends approximately 8° north or south of the ecliptic, the apparent path of the Sun, the Moon, and visible planets across the celestial sphere's constellations, over the course of the year.

Rabbit (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Rabbit () is the fourth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Rabbit is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol .

Dragon (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Dragon is the fifth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Dragon is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol 辰, pronounced chen.

Tiger (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Tiger (寅) is the third of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Tiger is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol 寅.

Snake (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Snake (蛇) is the sixth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Snake is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol 巳.

Goat (zodiac) Sign in the Chinese zodiac

The Goat is the eighth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. This zodiacal sign is often referred to as the "Ram" or "Sheep" sign, since the Chinese word yáng is more accurately translated as Caprinae, a taxonomic subfamily that includes both goats and sheep, but contrasts with other animal subfamily types such as Bovinae, Antilopinae, and other taxonomic considerations which may be encountered in the case of the larger family of Bovidae in Chinese mythology, which also includes the Ox (zodiac). The Year of the Goat is associated with the 8th Earthly Branch symbol, (wèi).

Monkey (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Monkey () is the ninth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Monkey is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol .

Ox (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The zodiacal Ox is the second of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Chinese term translated here as ox is in Chinese niú (牛), a word generally referring to cows and other types of the bovine family). The Year of the Ox is denoted by the Earthly Branch symbol 丑.

Rat (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Zodiacal Rat or Zodiacal Mouse is the first of the repeating 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac, constituting part of the Chinese calendar system. The Year of the Rat in standard Chinese is ; the rat is associated with the first branch of the Earthly Branch symbol 子 (), which starts a repeating cycle of twelve years. The Chinese word shǔ​ (鼠) refers to various types of Muroidea, such as rats and mice. The term "zodiac" ultimately derives from an Ancient Greek term referring to a "circle of little animals". There are also a yearly month of the rat and a daily hour of the rat. Years of the rat are cyclically differentiated by correlation to the Heavenly Stems cycle, resulting in a repeating cycle of five years of the rat, each rat year also being associated with one of the Chinese wu xing, also known as the "five elements", or "phases": the "Five Phases" being Fire, Water, Wood, Metal, and Earth.

Earthly Branches East Asian system of 12 ordinals

The twelve Earthly Branches or Terrestrial Branches are a Chinese ordering system used throughout East Asia in various contexts, including its ancient dating system, astrological traditions, zodiac and ordinals.

The traditional Korean calendar or Dangun calendar is a lunisolar calendar. Like most traditional calendars of other East Asian countries, the Korean Calendar is mainly derived from the Chinese calendar. Dates are calculated from Korea's meridian, and observances and festivals are based in Korean culture.

The sexagenary cycle, also known as the Stems-and-Branches or ganzhi, is a cycle of sixty terms, each corresponding to one year, thus a total of sixty years for one cycle, historically used for reckoning time in China and the rest of the East Asian cultural sphere. It appears as a means of recording days in the first Chinese written texts, the Shang oracle bones of the late second millennium BC. Its use to record years began around the middle of the 3rd century BC. The cycle and its variations have been an important part of the traditional calendrical systems in Chinese-influenced Asian states and territories, particularly those of Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, with the old Chinese system still in use in Taiwan, and to a lesser extent, in Mainland China.

Astrological sign Twelve 30° sectors of the ecliptic, as defined by Western astrology

In Western astrology, astrological signs are the twelve 30° sectors of the ecliptic, starting at the vernal equinox, also known as the First Point of Aries. The order of the astrological signs is Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius and Pisces. Each sector was named for a constellation it was passing through in times of naming.

The Tibetan calendar is a lunisolar calendar, that is, the Tibetan year is composed of either 12 or 13 lunar months, each beginning and ending with a new moon. A thirteenth month is added every two or three years, so that an average Tibetan year is equal to the solar year.

Chinese zodiac system that assigns an animal to each year in a repeating twelve-year cycle

The Chinese zodiac is a classification scheme based on the lunar calendar that assigns an animal and its reputed attributes to each year in a repeating 12-year cycle. The 12-year cycle is an approximation to the 11.85-year orbital period of Jupiter. Originating from China, the zodiac and its variations remain popular in many Asian countries, such as Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand.

Rooster (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Rooster is the tenth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Rooster is represented by the Earthly Branch symbol 酉.

Dog in Chinese mythology

Dogs are an important motif in Chinese mythology. These motifs include a particular dog which accompanies a hero, the dog as one of the twelve totem creatures for which years are named, a dog giving first provision of grain which allowed current agriculture, and claims of having a magical dog as an original ancestor in the case of certain ethnic groups.

References

  1. "When is Chinese New Year?". pinyin.info. Retrieved 14 March 2018.
  2. USC U.S.-China Institute (4 February 2019). "Celebrating the Year of the Pig". Talking Points newsletter. Retrieved 7 February 2019.

Further reading