Dunoding

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Post-Roman Welsh kingdoms. Dunoding is in the northwest, along the southern edge of the Llyn Peninsula. The modern Anglo-Welsh border is also shown. Wales.post-Roman.jpg
Post-Roman Welsh kingdoms. Dunoding is in the northwest, along the southern edge of the Llŷn Peninsula. The modern Anglo-Welsh border is also shown.

Dunoding was an early sub-kingdom within the Kingdom of Gwynedd in north-west Wales that existed between the 5th and 10th centuries. According to tradition, it was named after Dunod, a son of the founding father of Gwynedd - Cunedda Wledig - who drove the Irish settlers from the area in c.460. The territory existed as a subordinate realm within Gwynedd until the line of rulers descended from Dunod expired in c.925. Following the end of the House of Dunod, it was split into the cantrefi of Eifionydd and Ardudwy and fully incorporated into Gwynedd. After the defeat of the kingdom of Gwynedd in 1283 and its annexation to England, the two cantrefi became parts of the counties of Caernarfonshire and Meirionnydd respectively. It is now part of the modern county of Gwynedd within a devolved Wales.

Kingdom of Gwynedd Kingdom in north Wales

The Principality or Kingdom of Gwynedd was a Roman Empire successor state that emerged in sub-Roman Britain in the 5th century during the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain.

Wales Country in northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

Ireland Island in north-west Europe, 20th largest in world, politically divided into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (a part of the UK)

Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.

List of the rulers of Dunoding

Later medieval genealogical sources, which need treating with some caution, list the following rulers of Dunoding:

  1. Dunod ap Cunedda (from c.450)
  2. Eifion ap Dunod
  3. Dingad ab Eifion
  4. Meurig ap Dingad
  5. Eifion ap Meurig
  6. Isaac ab Eifion
  7. Pobien Hen ab Isaac
  8. Pobddelw ap Pobien
  9. Eifion ap Pobddelw
  10. Brochwel ab Eifion
  11. Eigion ap Brochwel
  12. Ieuanawl ab Eigion
  13. Caradog ab Ieuanawl
  14. Bleiddud ap Caradog
  15. Cuhelyn ap Bleiddud (c.860 - 925)

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