Ed Krupp

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Edwin Charles Krupp
Ed Krupp 2017.jpg
Ed Krupp in his Griffith Observatory office
Born (1944-11-18) November 18, 1944 (age 76)
Chicago, Illinois
NationalityAmerican
Other namesEd, E.C.
EducationB.A. Physics/Astronomy (1966),
M.A. Astronomy (1968)
PhD Astronomy (1972)
Alma mater Pomona College (B.A.), University of California, Los Angeles (M.A. and PhD)
Spouse(s)
Robin Rector Krupp
(m. 1968;div. 2006)
Children1 son
Awards Klumpke-Roberts Award (1989)
Andrew Gemant Award (2013)
Scientific career
Fields Astronomy, Astronomy and Culture
Institutions Griffith Observatory
Doctoral advisor George O. Abell
Other academic advisorsRobert J. Chambers

Edwin Charles Krupp (born November 18, 1944) is an American astronomer, researcher, author, and popularizer of science. He is an internationally recognized expert in the field of archaeoastronomy, the study of how ancient cultures viewed the sky and how those views affected their cultures. He has taught at the college level, as a planetarium lecturer, and in various documentary films. He has been the director of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles since first taking over the position in 1974 after the departure of the previous director, William J. Kaufmann III. His writings include science papers and journal articles, astronomy magazine articles, books on astronomy and archaeoastronomy for adults, and books explaining sky phenomena and astronomy to children.

Contents

Krupp is a member of the American Astronomical Society and the International Astronomical Union, and has served in several divisions and commissions of both organizations. He is also a fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry and a member of that organization's Council for Media Integrity.

Early life

Edwin Charles Krupp was born in Chicago, Illinois, on November 18, 1944 [1] where as a child his parents took him to many of the local museums. [2] In 1956 the family moved to Los Angeles where Krupp's father, a mechanical engineer, [2] worked on the Apollo program and then on the Space Shuttle. [3]

Education

In 1961 Krupp attended the Summer Science Program (SSP). [4] Among other things, SSP teaches astronomy to high school students. [5] Krupp has remained active with SSP, first as a graduate student teaching assistant from 1968 to 1972 and later as a frequent guest lecturer. [4] Krupp has said of SSP,

In some respects, SSP remains the most academically cohesive and intense educational experience I have ever had. That, I suspect, is true for most who are fortunate enough to attend it. If it weren't for SSP, my vision would be narrower, my aspirations less ambitious, and my life less rich. I don't exaggerate. [4]

Pomona College Pomona2.jpg
Pomona College

Krupp studied physics and astronomy at Pomona College (the founding member of the Claremont Colleges consortium) in Claremont, California. [6] His undergraduate advisor was Robert J. Chambers. [7] While studying at Pomona College, Krupp participated in cross-country, track, and soccer. [8] He also worked at KSPC, the Pomona College non-commercial community radio station. [8] He lived for two years at the Brackett Observatory, during this time he served as caretaker of the observatory, weatherman, and telescope demonstrator. [7] He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1966. [7] [9]

Krupp pursued graduate studies in astronomy at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), receiving a Master of Arts degree in 1968 [7] [9] and PhD in 1972. [7] His Ph.D. dissertation concerned the morphology of rich clusters of galaxies. [3] His graduate adviser was George O. Abell. [lower-alpha 1] [3] [6]

Career

Teaching

Krupp began his teaching career as a teaching assistant for the Summer Science Program during his graduate school days. [10] Also, during graduate school he taught at the following education institutions: [11]

He became a planetarium lecturer at Griffith Observatory while also still in graduate school. [13] Krupp has been a frequent lecturer throughout his career. He has lectured on science based tours he has led and other venues. [3] [8] [12] [14] [15]

Griffith Observatory

An aerial view of Griffith Observatory on the south facing slope of Mount Hollywood in Griffith Park, Los Angeles An aerial view of Griffith Observatory.jpg
An aerial view of Griffith Observatory on the south facing slope of Mount Hollywood in Griffith Park, Los Angeles

Krupp took his first job at Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles [lower-alpha 2] while he was still a doctoral candidate at UCLA. This was as a part-time planetarium lecturer [13] [17] [18] and Krupp did not enjoy this job at first, saying to his wife Robin, "Gee this isn't science, It's showbusiness." [3] But, after he started noticing the audiences responding with increasing enthusiasm he started saying, "Hey, this is showbusiness." [3]

Krupp was appointed Observatory Curator in 1972 upon completion of his PhD. [11] In 1974 the director of Griffith Observatory, William J. Kaufmann III, left, and Krupp was appointed acting director. [11] [17] [18] [19] In 1976 Krupp's title was changed from "acting" director to director. [11]

Ed Krupp Communing With Albert Einstein at Griffith Observatory Krupp and Einstein.jpg
Ed Krupp Communing With Albert Einstein at Griffith Observatory

As early as 1978 Krupp was aware that the observatory would need a future restoration and that there was a need to update equipment and exhibits. So he and Harold and Debra Griffith [lower-alpha 3] co-founded the Friends of the Observatory (FOTO). [21] FOTO aids the mission of the observatory in many ways. FOTO partnered with the city to renovate and expand the observatory raising US$30 million for the effort ($26 million in private funds). [21] The observatory closed its doors in 2002 for the $93 Million dollar renovation and expansion. [8] [18] The entire project was spearheaded by Krupp, and the observatory reopened in the fall of 2006. [18]

Krupp often appears in the media to discuss and explain developments and recent discoveries in astronomy, as well as discuss current celestial events. [6] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26]

In 2014 Griffith Observatory had its 80th anniversary and Krupp his 40th as observatory director. [13] At that time, John Ashton of Sunseeker Tours in Long Beach noted, "It’s an L.A. treasure. We get more requests to see this than anything." [13] And, then LA City Councilman Tom LaBonge (whose district included the observatory) observed:

There are many, many, many very special public employees, but there’s only one Dr. Edwin C. Krupp. Not only does he have the greatest building in the city. He’s got the universe. [13]

Archaeoastronomy

Burro Flats Pictographs in the Simi Hills of Southern California Pictographs at the Burro Flats Painted Cave.png
Burro Flats Pictographs in the Simi Hills of Southern California

Krupp has a special interest in the impact of astronomy on ancient belief systems, and is an internationally recognized expert on traditional astronomies. [12] He is noted for his many contributions to the field on which he has written extensively, and he has visited, and studied, nearly 2,000 prehistoric, and historic sites around the world. [6] [27]

Krupp has traveled around the world for his archaeoastronomy studies. These trips have also taken him to sites close to home such as the Burro Flats pictograph site in the Simi Hills of Southern California, which he first visited in 1979. Over the years, Krupp has made semi-regular trips to that site to conduct solstice observations. [28]

Krupp has shared his studies of archaeoastronomy with the general public by including archaeoastronomy topics in Griffith Observatory planetarium programs, [27] writing books and magazine articles, [29] [30] appearing in documentary films, and leading tours to archaeological sites that are associated with ancient astronomy. [8] [14] [31]

Bibliography

Krupp has written several books for adults and for children. His first two adult books (one being his doctoral dissertation), both derive from the work he did on rich clusters of galaxies while a PhD student at UCLA. His remaining adult books derive from his interests in archaeoastronomy, and contain extensive original research and analysis, while also being educational in nature. They cover astronomy in ancient cultures and the effect of beliefs about the sky on those cultures. [31]

Books for adults

Books authored, partially authored, and/or edited by Krupp for an adult audience: [31]

TitleAuthor(s)Year PublishedPublisherDescriptionReferences
The Morphology of Rich Clusters of GalaxiesEdwin C. Krupp1972 University Microfilms International,
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Doctoral Dissertation (UCLA) [32]
The Luminosity Function of E-S0 Galaxies in Rich ClustersEdwin C. Krupp1974 University of California,
Los Angeles
[33]
In Search of Ancient AstronomiesEdwin C. Krupp (editor, principal author)1978 Doubleday,
Garden City, New York
Survey of the new scientific discipline of archaeoastronomy, the study of the astronomies of ancient and prehistoric times through archaeology. [3]
[34]
Echoes of the Ancient Skies: The Astronomy of Ancient Civilizations [lower-alpha 4] Edwin C. Krupp1983 Harper & Row,
New York
The study of ancient peoples' observations of the skies and the impact of those observations on their cultural evolution [35]
Archaeoastronomy and the Roots of ScienceEdwin C. Krupp (Editor, Author)1984 Westview Press,
Boulder, Colorado
Reviews recent research, on the astronomy of worldwide ancient cultures and the effects of astronomy on those cultures. [36]
Beyond the Blue Horizon – Myths and Legends of the Sun, Moon, Stars, and PlanetsEdwin C. Krupp1991 HarperCollins,
New York
A worldwide comparative study of celestial mythology, Skywatchers, Shamans, & Kings: Astronomy and the Archaeology of Power [37]
Skywatchers, Shamans, & Kings: Astronomy and the Archaeology of PowerEdwin C. Krupp1996 John Wiley,
New York
Journey to the world's essential sacred places and celestial shrines and see where the rulers of old communed with the gods of the sky. [38]

Chapters, forewords, and research papers

Krupp has also written full chapters for books edited by other authors, as well as research papers, included in publications of the proceedings of conferences where the papers were presented. Here are some examples

  • Time and astronomy at the meeting of two worlds : proceedings of the International Symposium held in April 27 – May, 1992 in Frombork, Poland edited by Stanislaw Iwaniszewski [39]
    • California Girls: Pleiades Traditions in Native California [40]
  • Handbook of Archaeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy edited by Clive Ruggles, [41] Krupp wrote three chapters for this book: [42]
    • In Part I, Themes and Issues
      • Chapter 5, Astronomy and power
      • Chapter 18, Archaeoastronomy concepts in popular culture
    • In Part III, Pre-Columbian and indigenous North America
      • Chapter 41, Rock Art of the greater southwest
  • Cosmology, Calendars, and Horizon-based Astronomy in Ancient Mesoamerica, edited by Anne S. Doud
    Susan Milbrath [43]
    • Krupp wrote the Foreword for this book,
      • Astronomy, Anthropology, and Anthony Aveni
  • Krupp has contributed to two books on the work of artist of James Turrell,
    • Mapping Spaces : a topological survey of the work by James Turrell [44]
      • Authors: Craig Adcock, E C Krupp, Mario Diacono, James Turrell
    • James Turrell: A Retrospective [45]
      • Authors: Michael Govan, James Turrell, Florian Holzherr, Christine Kim, Carol S Eliel, Alison Lima Greene, E C Krupp, Vivian Sobchack

Books for children

Children themed books, with illustrations by Robin Rector Krupp: [31]

TitleYear PublishedPublisherDescriptionReferences
The Comet and You1985 Macmillan Publishing Company, New York;
Collier Macmillan, London
History, appearance, and physical composition of Halley's comet, compares it to other comets, describes its path through the solar system, and its predicted return [46]
The Big Dipper and You1989Morrow Junior Books New York What is known today and past beliefs about the Big Dipper, or Ursa Major. Added information on the North Star, or Polaris. [47]
The Moon and You1993 Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, New York;
Macmillan Publishing Company, New York;
Maxwell Macmillan Canada, Toronto;
Maxwell Macmillan International, New York
Information about the moon, describing its phases, rotation, effect on our tides, and myths and legends. [48]
[49]
The Rainbow and You2000 HarperCollins, New York;
Morrow Junior Books, New York
How rainbows are formed by the colors in sunlight shining through raindrops. [50]
[51]

Magazine/journal articles

Krupp was once a contributing editor to Sky & Telescope magazine and had a monthly column in that publication. [31] [15] [52] The column was named Rambling Through the Skies and discussed the impact of astronomy on cultural. [12] He has also served as the editor of the Griffith Observer, the monthly magazine published by Griffith Observatory's. [12]

Krupp has written many articles on astronomy and culture for the general reader and dozens of research papers. [7] This list is a mere sampling:

TitleMagazine/JournalDate/VolumePageDescriptionReferences
Whiter Shade of Pale Sky & Telescope July 200086A rock that looks like the Milky Way and was used in ceremonies by Native Americans in California. [30]
[53]
Inner Glow Sky & Telescope December 200450About the underground shrine at Newgrange, Ireland. [29]
[53]
The Great 2012 Scare Sky & Telescope November 200922–26The Maya Calendar does not predict the end of the world in December 2012. [54]
Archaeoastronomy Unplugged: Eliminating the Fuzz Tone from Rock Art AstronomyAmerican Indian Rock Art2006
Volume 21, Vol. 3
353–370 [55]
Hiawatha in CaliforniaAstronomy Quarterly1991
Vol. 8, No. 1
47–64 [56]
Night Gallery: the Function, Origin, and Evolution of ConstellationsArchaeoastronomy200043–63 [57]
Egyptian Astronomy: The Roots of Modern Timekeeping New Scientist January 3, 198024–27 [58]
[59]
Saluting the SolsticeNews from Native CaliforniaNovember 1987
Vol. 1(5)
10–13 [55]
When Things are Divided in HalfRock Art Papers San Diego Museum Papers1990
No. 26, Vol. 7
41–48 [55]

Films

Krupp has appeared in several documentary films and educational film series. He also has writing credits and scientific advisor credits. These include:

TitleTypeYearEd's RoleDescriptionReferences
Project Universe [lower-alpha 5] PBS Telecourse Series (30 half-hour episodes)1978Presenter/WriterIntroduction to Astronomy [27]
[60]
Time Travel: Fact, Fiction and FantasyDocumentary/Science Fiction1985Cast – Himself
SeasonsShort Documentary1987Scientific Consultant
Secrets and Mysteries
    (episode) Stonehenge
Documentary Series1988Cast – HimselfA look at England's Stonehenge, compared to American sites such as Arizona's Casa Grande and Mystery Hill in New Hampshire.
The Complete CosmosShort Documentary/Science Fiction Series1998–1999Thanks to Ed Krupp and Griffith ObservatoryGuide to the wonders of the universe.
Horizon
    (episode) Atlantis Reborn
Documentary Series1999Cast – Himself
SolarmaxShort Documentary2000Scientific Advisory CommitteeThe story of humankind's struggle to understand the sun.
The Universe
    (episode) Constellations (2008)
    (episode) Stonehenge (2014)
    (episode) Pyramids (2014)
Documentary Series2007–2015Cast – HimselfExplores many scientific questions and topics about the universe
Extreme Universe
    (episode) Star Gates
Documentary Series2010Cast – Himself
Why We Will Still Be Here on Dec. 21 [2012]Panel Discussion2012Panel MemberSponsored and filmed by SETI, Why the Mayan calendar does not predict the end of the world. [30]

Planetarium programs

Krupp started his career at Griffith Observatory as a planetarium lecturer. As directory of the observatory he has returned to the Samuel Oschin Planetarium at Griffith Observatory as a writer. He has several planetarium show writing credits.

TitleWriter(s)DescriptionReferences
Centered in the UniverseDon Dixon,
E.C. Krupp,
Andre Bormanis
Asks fundamental questions about Earth's and humankind's place in the universe. [61]
Time's UpLaura Danly,
Ed Krupp,
Don Dixon,
Chris Shelton
How time and the universe works and why the Mayan calendar did not predict the end of the world in 2012. [62]
Light of the Valkyries [lower-alpha 6] Laura Danly,
Don Dixon,
Ed Krupp
A voyage of Viking cosmology that explores the true nature of the aurora borealis, the northern lights.
First Light: The Telescope Changed EverythingEd KruppHow the world changed after Galileo Galilei built the world's finest telescope and pointed it to the sky. [64]

Professional affiliations

Krupp is affiliated with several scientific, astronomical, archaeoatronomical, and educational organizations.

Awards and honors

Krupp's writings, and active evangelization of the universe to the public, has resulted in his receiving several awards and honors:

Award/HonorWhenAwarded ByDescriptionWork HonoredReferences
Science-Writing Award1978 American Institute of Physics (AIP) In Search of Ancient Astronomies [3]
Science-Writing Award1985 American Institute of Physics (AIP) The Comet and You [lower-alpha 7] [69]
Klumpke-Roberts Award 1989 Astronomical Society of the Pacific For contributing to the understanding and appreciation of astronomy by the public. [12]
Honorary Doctor of Science 1996 West Coast University [9]
Clifford W. Holmes Award 2002Riverside Telescope Makers Conference (Riverside, California)For major contributions toward popularizing astronomy. [70]
Honorary Doctor of Science 2011 Pomona College [7]
[9]
Andrew Gemant Award [lower-alpha 8] November 22, 2013 American Institute of Physics (AIP) Awarded to a person that has made substantial cultural, artistic, or humanistic contributions to physics. [6]
[17]
[18]
Blaisdell Distinguished Alumni Award [lower-alpha 9] April 29, 2016 Pomona College Honors alumni for achievement in professional and community service [7]

On November 22, 2013 Krupp was presented with the Andrew Gemant Award at a session of the Los Angeles city council, the award citation indicated that Krupp was being recognized for: [6] [17]

At the ceremony Catherine O'Riordan, then AIP vice president of Physics Resources said:

Griffith Observatory, where Edwin Krupp has been director for nearly four decades, is the most-visited public observatory in the world. Through telescopes, other public instruments, innovative exhibits, and live astronomical programs, he has brought the heavens to life for millions on the ground. [6] [71]

Personal life

Krupp married Robin Rector on New Year's Eve of 1968. [11] They had one son [3] and divorced in 2006.[ citation needed ] Krupp now resides in the Eagle Rock neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. [13]

Notes

  1. George Abell was Academic Advisor to the Summer Science Program when Krupp attended as a high school student.
  2. Both Griffith Observatory and Griffith Park where the observatory is located were given to the city of Los Angeles by Griffith J. Griffith a wealthy Los Angeles businessman. [16]
  3. Harold Griffith was the grandson of Griffith J. Griffith. [20] Debra was his wife. [21] Griffith J. Griffith was the wealthy businessman that donated both Griffith Park and the Griffith Observatory within the park to the city of Los Angeles. [16]
  4. Selected for Book of the Month Club/Science. Also selected for two Macmillan book clubs (as the main and alternate selections). [12]
  5. Project Universe was nominated for a local Emmy Award. [3]
  6. IMDb classifies Light of the Valkyries as an Animation Short. It is in fact, a planetarium show in the Samuel Oschin Planetarium at Griffith Observatory. [63]
  7. The first time the Science-Writing award was given for a book written for children. [69]
  8. Named for Andrew Gemant, a twentieth century physicist who specialized in the fields of viscoelasticity and fractional differentials.
  9. Recognizes alumni who have borne the essence of Pomona College into the world, and have emulated to the James A. Blaisdell quotation carved on the college gates: "They only are loyal to the college who departing bear their added riches in trust for mankind." [7]

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References

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