Emory University Hospital

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Emory University Hospital
Emory Healthcare
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Emory University Hospital Front Entrance.jpg
Emory University Hospital
Geography
Location Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Organisation
Type Teaching
Affiliated university Emory University
Services
Beds587 licensed beds
History
Opened1904
Links
Website www.emoryhealthcare.org

Coordinates: 33°47′30″N84°19′11.7″W / 33.79167°N 84.319917°W / 33.79167; -84.319917

Contents

Emory University Hospital is a 733-bed facility in Atlanta, Georgia, specializing in the care of acutely ill adults. Emory University Hospital is staffed exclusively by Emory University School of Medicine faculty who also are members of The Emory Clinic. The hospital is renowned as one of the nation's leaders in cardiology and cardiac surgery, oncology, transplantation, ophthalmology, and the neurosciences. [1] [2] [3]

History

Emory University Hospital's history dates back over a century. In March 1904, its predecessor, Wesley Memorial Hospital, was chartered with 50 beds. The hospital was housed in a downtown Atlanta mansion that had been spared from destruction by General Sherman's army during the Civil War.

By November 1922, the hospital had grown too large for its quarters and moved to its current DeKalb County site on the Emory University campus. The new 275-bed facility was a gift of Asa G. Candler, philanthropist and founder of The Coca-Cola Company.

In the mid-1930s, its name was changed to Emory University Hospital. The university and the hospital bear the name of Bishop John Emory, who presided at a meeting of the Georgia Methodist Conference in 1834 when delegates decided to establish a Methodist college in Georgia.

The City of Atlanta annexed Emory University effective January 1, 2018. [4] Prior to the annexation, the hospital was in an unincorporated area, statistically in the Druid Hills census-designated place. [5] [6]

General description

Emory University Hospital is a 587-bed facility specializing in the care of the acutely ill adult. The hospital is located on the Emory University campus in northeast Atlanta.More than 24,000 inpatients and 80,000 outpatients come to Emory University Hospital each year. They receive care from physicians of The Emory Clinic, who also are faculty of the Emory University School of Medicine, and from a highly trained staff of nurses and other clinical professionals.

Emory University Hospital Emory University Hospital Druid Hills.jpg
Emory University Hospital

The hospital provides a full range of specialized care. News and World Report's "America's Best Hospitals" for several years as one of the nation's top 10 cardiology centers.The latest data show it has 23,710 admissions and performs 9,446 inpatient and 2,843 outpatient surgeries. Its emergency room has 30,476 visits. Located in Atlanta, GA, it is accredited by the Joint Commission, Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). It is also a teaching hospital.[ citation needed ]

Rankings

On the U.S. News's "America's Best Hospitals", 2010–11, Emory University Hospital was ranked in 11 adult specialties. Out of 4,852 facilities analyzed for the 2010-11 Best Hospitals rankings, only 152 were ranked in any of the 16 specialties and this hospital was one of them. [7]

2014 West Africa Ebola Outbreak

On July 31, 2014, the United States government and the Centers for Disease Control announced that Emory Hospital would treat at least one of the patients of the 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak in a specialized isolation facility. [8] [9] [10] [11] Brantly was released August 21, 2014 with Dr. Bruce Ribner, director of Emory's Infectious Disease Unit, declaring that Brantly "… has recovered from the Ebola virus disease and he can return to his family, to his community, and to his life without any public health concerns". In his statement, Brantly reported that Writebol had been released two days earlier (on August 19). Brantly and Writebol were the first patients ever to be treated with the experimental drug ZMapp, splitting a dose between both patients; Samaritan's Purse later reported Brantly's condition began to improve within hours of receiving the treatment, although they point out that it is unclear if either the treatment or a blood transfusion, received in Africa from a young Ebola survivor, was responsible for the improvement. [12] [13]

On October 15, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced that Amber Vinson, the second case of Ebola transmission in the U.S., would be transferred to Emory. [14] Vinson has since recovered from the disease and been declared Ebola-free. [15]

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References

  1. "U.S. News & World Report Ranks Emory Among Nation's Best Hospitals for 2011 - Emory University - Atlanta, GA". shared.web.emory.edu.
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-12-09. Retrieved 2009-12-07.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. "Emory University Hospital Tower staff open house brings big crowd". news.emory.edu. 31 July 2017.
  4. Niesse, Mark (2020-02-20). "Atlanta expands eastward by completing annexation of Emory and CDC". Atlanta Journal-Constitution . Retrieved 2020-03-11. - This article includes a map of the annexed area, which includes Emory Hospital
  5. "Emory University Hospital". Emory Healthcare. Retrieved 2020-03-11. 1364 Clifton Rd NE Atlanta, GA 30322
  6. "2010 CENSUS - CENSUS BLOCK MAP: Druid Hills CDP, GA." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on June 1, 2017.
  7. "U.S. News & World Report Ranks Emory Among Nation's Best Hospitals for 2011". Emory University. July 19, 2011. Archived from the original on July 23, 2011. Retrieved Feb 21, 2011.
  8. "Ebola Virus Outbreak". NBC News. Archived from the original on August 26, 2014.
  9. "Atlanta hospital deemed 1 of safest for Ebola care". MSN News. Associated Press. Aug 3, 2014. Archived from the original on August 26, 2014. Retrieved August 2, 2014.
  10. "US allays Ebola fears as doctors flown home for treatment". Atlanta News.Net. Archived from the original on August 26, 2014. Retrieved Aug 2, 2014.
  11. "as ebola crisis grows calls grow.html". Miami Herald . Aug 5, 2014.
  12. "Ebola Patient Dr. Kent Brantly Says 'God Saved My Life'". ABC News. Aug 21, 2014. Archived from the original on August 26, 2014. Retrieved Aug 26, 2014.
  13. "American Ebola doc: 'I am thrilled to be alive'". Yahoo! News . Associated Press. Aug 21, 2014. Archived from the original on 2014-08-21. Retrieved Aug 26, 2014.
  14. "Dallas Ebola Patient Being Transferred to Emory". ABC News. October 15, 2014. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  15. "Nurse Amber Vinson free of Ebola virus, family says". Yahoo News. October 23, 2014. Retrieved October 23, 2014.