Flora of North America

Last updated

The Flora of North America North of Mexico (usually referred to as FNA) is a multivolume work describing the native plants and naturalized plants of North America, including the United States, Canada, St. Pierre and Miquelon, and Greenland. It includes bryophytes and vascular plants. All taxa are described and included in dichotomous keys, distributions of all species and infraspecific taxa are mapped, and about 20% of species are illustrated with line drawings prepared specifically for FNA. It is expected to fill 30 volumes when completed and will be the first work to treat all of the known flora north of Mexico.

Twenty-one of the volumes have been published. [1] Soon after publication, the contents are made available online. [2] [3]

FNA is a collaboration of about 1,000 authors, artists, reviewers, and editors from throughout the world [3]

Related Research Articles

<i>Erythronium</i>

Erythronium, the fawn lily, trout lily, dog's-tooth violet or adder's tongue, is a genus of Eurasian and North American plants in the lily family, most closely related to tulips. The name Erythronium derives from Ancient Greek ἐρυθρός (eruthrós) "red" in Greek, referring to the red flowers of E. dens-canis.

Goldenrod list of plants with the same or similar names

Goldenrod is a common name for many species of flowering plants in the sunflower family, Asteraceae, commonly in reference to the genus Solidago.

<i>Quercus michauxii</i>

Quercus michauxii, the swamp chestnut oak, is a species of oak in the white oak section Quercus section Quercus in the beech family. It is native to bottomlands and wetlands in the southeastern and midwestern United States, in coastal states from New Jersey to Texas, inland primarily in the Mississippi–Ohio Valley as far as Oklahoma, Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana.

<i>Clintonia</i>

Clintonia is a genus of flowering plants in the lily family Liliaceae. Plants of the genus are distributed across the temperate regions of North America and eastern Asia, in the mesic understory of deciduous or coniferous forests. The genus, first described by Constantine Samuel Rafinesque in 1818, was named for DeWitt Clinton (1769–1828), a naturalist and politician from the U.S. state of New York. For this reason, plants of the genus are commonly known as Clinton's lily. The common name bluebead refer to the distinctive fruit of members of the genus. Since fruit color varies somewhat across species, the common name bead lily is used as well.

<i>Anemonoides quinquefolia</i> Species of flowering plant in the buttercup family Ranunculaceae

Anemonoides quinquefolia, a flowering plant in the buttercup family Ranunculaceae, is native to North America. It is commonly called wood anemone or windflower, not to be confused with Anemonoides nemorosa, a closely related European species also known by these common names. The specific epithet quinquefolia means "five-leaved", which is a misnomer since each leaf has just three leaflets. A plant typically has a single, small white flower with 5 sepals.

<i>Anemonastrum canadense</i> Species of flowering plant in the buttercup family Ranunculaceae

Anemonastrum canadense, synonym Anemone canadensis, the Canada anemone, round-headed anemone, round-leaf thimbleweed, meadow anemone, windflower, or crowfoot, is a herbaceous perennial native to moist meadows, thickets, streambanks, and lakeshores in North America, spreading rapidly by underground rhizomes, valued for its white flowers.

<i>Heliopsis</i>

Heliopsis is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants in the sunflower family, native to dry prairies in North and South America. The sunflower-like composite flowerheads are usually yellow, up to 8 cm (3 in) in diameter, and are borne in summer. Species are commonly called ox-eye or oxeye.

<i>Trillium ovatum</i>

Trillium ovatum, the Pacific trillium, also known as the western wakerobin, western white trillium, or western trillium, is a species of flowering plant in the family Melanthiaceae. It is found in western North America, from southern British Columbia and the tip of southwestern Alberta to central California, east to Idaho and western Montana. There is an isolated population in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming.

<i>Symphyotrichum ericoides</i> A flowering plant in the family Asteraceae native to central and eastern North America

Symphyotrichum ericoides, known as white heath aster, frost aster, or heath aster, is a species of flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, native to much of central and eastern North America. It has also been introduced to parts of Europe and western Asia.

<i>Quercus buckleyi</i>

Quercus buckleyi, commonly known as Texas red oak or Buckley's oak, is a species of flowering plant in the beech family. It is endemic to the southern Great Plains of the United States.

<i>Quercus minima</i>

Quercus minima, the dwarf live oak or minimal oak, is a North American species of shrubs in the beech family. It is native to the southeastern United States.

Flora of China is a scientific publication aimed at describing the plants native to China.

Solidago houghtonii

Oligoneuron houghtonii is a rare North American species of flowering plant in the aster family known as Houghton's goldenrod. It is native to southern Ontario, Canada and the northern United States. It is threatened by the loss and degradation of its habitat. It is a federally listed threatened species of the United States and it is designated a species of special concern by Canada's Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.

<i>Carex austrina</i> Species of North American sedge

Carex austrina, known as southern sedge, is a species of sedge endemic to the southern and central United States.

<i>Symphyotrichum shortii</i> A flowering plant in the family Asteraceae native to North America

Symphyotrichum shortii, commonly called Short's aster, is a species of flowering plant in the aster family (Asteraceae). It is native to North America, where it is primarily found in interior areas, east of the Mississippi River. Its natural habitat is in thin, rocky soils of woodlands and thickets, often around limestone bluffs. It is common throughout much of its range, although it is generally restricted to intact natural communities.

<i>Hypericum gymnanthum</i> Species of flowering plant in the St Johns wort family Hypericaceae

Hypericum gymnanthum, the small-flowered St. John's wort or clasping leaf St. John's wort, is a species of flowering plant in the St. John's wort family Hypericaceae native to wet woods, bogs, and ditches of the eastern United States and Guatemala. It has been introduced to Poland.

<i>Hypericum fasciculatum</i> Species of flowering plant in the St Johns wort family Hypericaceae

Hypericum fasciculatum, known as peelbark St. Johnswort or sandweed, is a species of flowering plant in the St. Johnswort family, Hypericaceae, native to the southeastern United States. It is found from eastern North Carolina, south to southern Florida, west to eastern Louisiana. Kew's Plants of the World Online database also notes that it occurs in Cuba, though Cuba is not listed in several other sources. It was first described in 1797 by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck.

<i>Calyptocarpus vialis</i> Species of plant

Calyptocarpus vialis is a species of flowering plant in the daisy family, Asteraceae. Common names for C. vialis include straggler daisy, horseherb, lawnflower, and creeping Cinderella-weed. It is native to the southern United States, Mexico, Belize, Venezuela, and the Caribbean. It has also been introduced to Argentina, Hawaii, India, Java, Australia, and Taiwan. It is one of only three species in the genus Calyptocarpus.

<i>Symphyotrichum racemosum</i> A flowering plant in the family Asteraceae native to North America

Symphyotrichum racemosum is a species of flowering plant native to parts of North America. It is known as smooth white oldfield aster, small white aster, and aster à grappes (French). It is a perennial, herbaceous plant in the family Asteraceae. It is a late-summer and fall blooming flower.

References

  1. "Search Results - Oxford University Press". global.oup.com. Retrieved 2020-07-20.
  2. "Flora of North America". eFloras.org. Retrieved 2012-11-05.
  3. 1 2 "FNA". beta.floranorthamerica.org. Retrieved 2020-07-20.