Greymouth railway station

Last updated

Greymouth
Greymouth Railway Station 001.JPG
Greymouth station in 2011
General information
LocationMackay Street, Greymouth, New Zealand
Coordinates 42°26′54″S171°12′52″E / 42.44833°S 171.21444°E / -42.44833; 171.21444 Coordinates: 42°26′54″S171°12′52″E / 42.44833°S 171.21444°E / -42.44833; 171.21444
Owned by KiwiRail
Operated by The Great Journeys of New Zealand
Line(s) Midland Line
PlatformsSingle side
TracksMain line (1)
Construction
ParkingYes
History
Opened1876
Rebuilt1897
Services
Preceding station The Great Journeys of New Zealand Following station
Moana
toward Christchurch
TranzAlpine Terminus
Designated28 June 1990
Reference no.3039

Greymouth railway station serves the town of Greymouth, on the West Coast of New Zealand. It is the northwestern terminus of the Midland Line.

Contents

Location

The station is on Mackay Street, at the eastern end of the Greymouth town centre. [1] It is at the northwestern end of the Midland Line, where it meets the Hokitika Line.

History

Greymouth Station in the early 1900s Greymouth Railway Station 1-2-005861-G ATL.jpg
Greymouth Station in the early 1900s

The first station in Greymouth was opened in 1876, as the terminus of a railway between Greymouth and the coalmine at Brunner. [1] [2] As the railway system of the West Coast grew, the station in Greymouth became the centre of the region's railway network, and was of particular importance to goods traffic from the region's primary industries as it served the main port in the area. As such, the station became unsuitable for the amount of traffic it was handling, and it was rebuilt in the mid-1890s, with the new station opening in 1897. [1] Despite the rebuild, the station was still considered inadequate, and extra facilities were added at the station several times in the early 1900s. [1] [3] After the Otira Tunnel opened linking the West Coast and Canterbury in 1923, passenger traffic further increased with the introduction of services to Christchurch; a footbridge was erected to handle the increased usage. [4] During the later part of the 20th century, traffic declined significantly, as both passengers and freight shifted to road transport. [1] The station was modernised in 1998, and several outbuildings were removed. [3]

The station is listed by Heritage New Zealand as a Category I Historic Place. This is due to its architectural quality as a relatively unaltered example of a second-class New Zealand railway station, and its historical significance as a former centre of the regional rail network. [3]

Services

The station is currently served by the TranzAlpine, which runs daily between Greymouth and Christchurch, and is operated by The Great Journeys of New Zealand, KiwiRail's scenic division. [5]

Related Research Articles

Carlisle railway station Railway station in Cumbria, England

Carlisle railway station, or Carlisle Citadel, is a Grade II* listed railway station serving the city of Carlisle, Cumbria, England. It is on the West Coast Main Line, 102 miles (164 km) south-east of Glasgow Central and 299 miles (481 km) north north-west of London Euston. It is the northern terminus of the Settle and Carlisle Line, a continuation of the Midland Main Line from Leeds, Sheffield and London St Pancras. It is so named because it is adjacent to Carlisle Citadel, a former medieval fortress. The station is owned by Network Rail.

Main South Line Railway line in New Zealand

The Main South Line, sometimes referred to as part of the South Island Main Trunk Railway, is a railway line that runs north and south from Lyttelton in New Zealand through Christchurch and along the east coast of the South Island to Invercargill via Dunedin. It is one of the most important railway lines in New Zealand and was one of the first to be built, with construction commencing in the 1860s. At Christchurch, it connects with the Main North Line to Picton, the other part of the South Island Main Trunk.

Cottingham railway station Railway station in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England

Cottingham railway station serves the village of Cottingham in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. Located on the Yorkshire Coast Line, it is managed by Northern. The station serves the northern suburbs of Hull and generates much commuter traffic.

NZR RM class (Midland)

The NZR RM class Midland railcar was the first successful railcar, and first diesel-powered vehicle, to enter revenue service in New Zealand. Two were built, RM 20 and RM 21, and they ran for five years from 1936 to 1941 before being replaced by larger Vulcan railcars. They operated primarily on the Midland Line and the Greymouth-Hokitika portion of the Ross Branch

<i>TranzAlpine</i>

The TranzAlpine is a passenger train operated by The Great Journeys of New Zealand in the South Island of New Zealand over the Midland Line; often regarded to be one of the world's great train journeys for the scenery through which it passes. The journey is 223 kilometres (139 mi) one-way, taking almost five hours. There are 16 tunnels and four viaducts, with the Staircase Viaduct elevated as much as 75 metres (246 ft).

Midland Line, New Zealand

The Midland line is a 212 km section of railway between Rolleston and Greymouth in the South Island of New Zealand. The line features five major bridges, five viaducts and 17 tunnels, the longest of which is the Otira tunnel. It is the route of the popular TranzAlpine passenger train.

New Zealand Midland Railway Company

The New Zealand Midland Railway Company partially constructed the Midland line between Christchurch and Greymouth and the Nelson railway in the South Island. It was one of the few private railway companies in New Zealand, and it did not match the success of the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company.

The Oxford Branch was a branch line railway that formed part of New Zealand's national rail network. It was located in the Canterbury region of the South Island, and ran roughly parallel with the Eyreton Branch that was located some ten kilometres south. It opened to Oxford in 1875 and survived until 1959.

The Rapahoe Branch is a branch line railway that forms part of New Zealand's national rail network and is located on the West Coast of the South Island. It has been operational since 1923 and was named the Rapahoe Industrial Line until 2011.

Main North Line, New Zealand Railway line in New Zealand between Picton and Christchurch

The Main North Line, sometimes referred to as part of the South Island Main Trunk railway, is a railway line that runs north from Christchurch in New Zealand up the east coast of the South Island through Kaikōura and Blenheim to Picton. It is a major link in New Zealand's national rail network and offers a connection with roll-on roll-off ferries from Picton to Wellington. It was also the longest railway construction project in New Zealand's history, with the first stages built in the 1870s and not completed until 1945.

Stillwater–Ngākawau Line

The Stillwater Ngākawau Line (SNL), formerly the Stillwater–Westport Line (SWL) and the Ngakawau Branch, is a secondary main line, part of New Zealand's national rail network. It runs between Stillwater and Ngakawau via Westport on the West Coast of the South Island. It was one of the longest construction projects in New Zealand's history, with its first section opened in 1889 and the full line completed 1942.

NZR RM class (Vulcan)

The NZR RM class Vulcan railcars were operated by the New Zealand Government Railways (NZR) in the South Island of New Zealand. All New Zealand railcars are classified as RM , and this class derived their nomenclature from the name of the manufacturer, the Vulcan Foundry of Britain.

Ross Branch (railway line)

The Ross Branch, officially known as the Hokitika Line since 2011, and previously as the Hokitika Industrial Line, is a branch line railway that forms part of New Zealand's national rail network. It is located in the Westland District of the South Island's West Coast region and opened to Hokitika in 1893. A further extension to Ross operated from 1909 until 1980.

Stillwater is a town in the South Island of New Zealand east of Greymouth on the banks of the Grey River, at the confluence with the Arnold River, in the Grey District of the West Coast, next to Brunner. There is also Stillwater, Auckland in the North Island.

Rail transport in Christchurch, the largest city on New Zealand's South Island, consists of two main trunk railway lines intersecting in the suburb of Addington, carrying mainly long-haul freight traffic but also two long distance tourist-oriented passenger trains. The two lines are the Main North Line and Main South Line, collectively but unofficially known as the South Island Main Trunk Railway. There is a heritage line at the Ferrymead Historic Park that is operated with steam, electric, and diesel motive power hauling tourist-oriented services.

Lyttelton Line

Lyttelton Line is a name sometimes used to refer to the section of the Main South Line in New Zealand's South Island between Lyttelton and Christchurch, and can also be used to refer to the operations on this section. As it has always been part of the Main South Line, this name has never been officially used to refer to the track itself.

Christchurch railway station, New Zealand Railway station in New Zealand

Christchurch railway station is in the Canterbury region of New Zealand's South Island. It is on the Main North Line at Addington junction, and is the only remaining passenger railway station in the city: suburban passenger trains were cancelled due to lack of demand in the 1970s. It is the terminus of the South Island's one remaining long-distance passenger train, the TranzAlpine.

Papanui railway station Defunct railway station in New Zealand

Papanui railway station served the suburb of Papanui in northern Christchurch, New Zealand. It was on the Main North Line between the stations of Bryndwr and Styx, 5.3 kilometres (3.3 mi) north of Addington Junction. The station handled freight and passenger traffic from when it opened in 1872 until closing in the late 20th century, and from 1880 was the site of an interchange between passenger rail and trams until the 1930s.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Greymouth Station". Rail Heritage Trust of New Zealand. Retrieved 30 May 2022.
  2. Scoble, Juliet (2010). "Names & Opening & Closing Dates of Railway Stations" (PDF). Rail Heritage Trust of New Zealand. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 January 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  3. 1 2 3 "Greymouth Railway Station". Heritage New Zealand . Retrieved 30 May 2022.
  4. "Greymouth Railway Station Footbridge [Relocated]". Heritage New Zealand . Retrieved 11 June 2022.
  5. "Greymouth". The Great Journeys of New Zealand. Retrieved 30 May 2022.