Gun Fury

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Gun Fury

Gun Fury - Film Poster.jpg

Theatrical Poster
Directed by Raoul Walsh
Produced by Lewis J. Rachmil
Screenplay by Roy Huggins
Irving Wallace
Based onTen against Caesar
1952 novel
by K.R.G. Granger
Starring Rock Hudson
Donna Reed
Leo Gordon
Lee Marvin
Neville Brand
Cinematography Lester White
Edited by Jerome Thoms
James Sweeney
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date
  • November 11, 1953 (1953-11-11)
Running time
83 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Donna Reed and Alma Beltran Donna Reed & Alma Beltran in 'Gun Fury'.jpg
Donna Reed and Alma Beltran

Gun Fury is a 1953 3-D western film directed by Raoul Walsh and starring Rock Hudson and Donna Reed, with major supporting roles for Philip Carey and Leo Gordon. The film is based on the novel Ten Against Caesar by Kathleen B. George and Robert A. Granger. The supporting cast includes Lee Marvin and Neville Brand. It was filmed in the Red Rocks area of Sedona, Arizona.

Western (genre) multimedia genre of stories set primarily in the American Old West

Western is a genre of various arts which tell stories set primarily in the latter half of the 19th century in the American Old West, often centering on the life of a nomadic cowboy or gunfighter armed with a revolver and a rifle who rides a horse. Cowboys and gunslingers typically wear Stetson hats, neckerchief bandannas, vests, spurs, cowboy boots and buckskins. Recurring characters include the aforementioned cowboys, Native Americans, bandits, lawmen, bounty hunters, outlaws, gamblers, soldiers, and settlers. The ambience is usually punctuated with a Western music score, including American and Mexican folk music such as country, Native American music, New Mexico music, and rancheras.

Raoul Walsh American film director and actor

Raoul A. Walsh was an American film director, actor, founding member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) and the brother of the silent screen actor George Walsh. He was known for portraying John Wilkes Booth in the silent classic The Birth of a Nation (1915) and for directing such films as The Big Trail (1930), starring John Wayne, High Sierra (1941), starring Ida Lupino and Humphrey Bogart; and White Heat (1949), starring James Cagney and Edmond O'Brien. He directed his last film in 1964.

Rock Hudson American actor

Rock Hudson was an American actor, generally known for his turns as a leading man during the 1950s and 1960s. Viewed as a prominent "heartthrob" of the Hollywood Golden Age, he achieved stardom with roles in films such as Magnificent Obsession (1954), All That Heaven Allows (1955) and Giant (1956), for which he received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actor, and found continued success with a string of romantic comedies co-starring Doris Day in Pillow Talk (1959), Lover Come Back (1961) and Send Me No Flowers (1964). After appearing in films including Seconds (1966), Tobruk (1967) and Ice Station Zebra (1968) during the late 1960s, Hudson began a second career in television through the 1970s and 1980s, starring in the popular mystery series McMillan & Wife and the primetime ABC soap opera Dynasty.

Contents

Plot synopsis

After a stagecoach holdup, Frank Slayton's (Philip Carey) notorious gang leave Ben Warren (Rock Hudson) for dead and head off with his fiancée. Warren follows, and although none of the townspeople he comes across are prepared to help, he manages to recruit two men who have sworn revenge on the ruthless Slayton.

Philip Carey United States Marine and actor

Philip Carey was an American actor.

Cast

Donna Reed American film and television actress

Donna Reed was an American film and television actress and producer. Her career spanned more than 40 years, with performances in more than 40 films. She is well known for her role as Mary Hatch Bailey in Frank Capra's 1946 film It's a Wonderful Life. In 1953, she received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance as Lorene Burke in the war drama From Here to Eternity.

Roberta Haynes is a retired American actress, active from 1949-89.

Leo Vincent Gordon was an American film and television character actor as well as a screenplay writer and novelist. During more than 40 years in film and television he was most frequently cast as a supporting actor playing brutish bad guys but occasionally played more sympathetic roles just as effectively.

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