Hart Lee Dykes

Last updated

Hart Lee Dykes
No. 88
Position: Wide receiver
Personal information
Born: (1966-09-02) September 2, 1966 (age 54)
Bay City, Texas
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:218 lb (99 kg)
Career information
High school: Bay City (TX)
College: Oklahoma State
NFL Draft: 1989  / Round: 1 / Pick: 16
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:83
Receiving yards:1,344
Receiving touchdowns:7
Player stats at NFL.com

Hart Lee Dykes Jr. [1] (born September 2, 1966) is a former professional American football player who played wide receiver for two seasons in the National Football League (NFL) for the New England Patriots. He was awarded the Dial Award as the national high school scholar-athlete of the year in 1984. He played two seasons, with his career being cut short when he fractured his kneecap [2] and because of an eye injury which occurred during a bar room fight that also involved teammate Irving Fryar in 1990. [3] He was also drafted into the Chicago White Sox minor league system in 1989. [4]

At OSU, he was a member of a talented offense with Mike Gundy at quarterback and Thurman Thomas and later, Barry Sanders at running back.

Dykes was selected in the first round (16th pick) of the 1989 NFL Draft. In two seasons with the Patriots, Dykes caught 83 passes for 1,344 yards and seven touchdowns. [5]

Dykes is a major advocate for charities such as the Jimmy Fund and Autism Awareness.

He was the winner of the Pitch, Hit and Run competition as a 10-year-old. He was honored at the 1977 MLB All-Star Game.[ citation needed ]

Dykes played high school basketball with LaBradford Smith, and the duo lead their high school, Bay City, to the 4A State Championship in 1985. He was also part of his high school's track team, which won a state championship in 1984. [6]

As of 2002, Dykes was the owner of a trucking company in Sugar Land, Texas. [7]

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References

  1. "Faces in the Crowd," Sports Illustrated, August 8, 1977. Retrieved December 19, 2020
  2. NFL Disability Plan Draws Congressional Attention - washingtonpost.com
  3. ESPN.com - Page2 - Readers: Worst NFL team
  4. SPORTS PEOPLE: BASEBALL; White Sox Sign Dykes - New York Times
  5. Hart Lee Dykes career stats
  6. Kensler, Tom (August 17, 1985). "Hitting Started Early for Dykes It's Been Open Season on Cowboy". The Oklahoman. Retrieved July 3, 2020.
  7. USATODAY.com