Houston Stars

Last updated
Houston Stars
Houston Stars badge.png
Full nameHouston Stars
Founded1967
Dissolved1968
Ground Astrodome
Capacity62,000
Owner Roy Mark Hofheinz
Manager Martim Francisco (1967)
Geza Henni (1968) [1]
League United Soccer Association (1967)
North American Soccer League (1968)
19682nd of Gulf Division

The Houston Stars were a soccer team based out of Houston, Texas that played in the United Soccer Association. [2] The league was made up of teams imported from foreign leagues. The Houston club was actually Bangu Atlético Clube from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They were owned by Roy Mark Hofheinz, owner of the Houston Astros and played their home matches at the Astrodome, making them the first ever soccer team to play its matches indoors.

Following the 1967 season, the USA merged with the National Professional Soccer League to form the North American Soccer League with the teams from the former USA having to create their rosters from scratch.

In their inaugural season in 1967, the Houston Stars drew an average home league attendance of 19,802 in six games, the highest of all soccer clubs in the United States that year. [3]

Year-by-year

YearLeagueWLTPtsRegular SeasonPlayoffs
1967USA444124th, Western DivisionDid Not Qualify
1968NASL141261502nd, Gulf DivisionDid Not Qualify

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References

  1. http://www.ussoccerplayers.com/a-soccer-history-of-houst
  2. Conway, Joe (January 30, 2006). "Can 1836 be a hit where other soccer teams have missed?". Houston Chronicle . Retrieved September 20, 2014.
  3. http://www.kenn.com/the_blog/?page_id=496