Ibrahim Taiwo

Last updated
Ibrahim Taiwo
Governor of Kwara State
In office
July 1975 13 February 1976
Preceded by David Bamigboye
Succeeded by George Agbazika Innih
Personal details
Born Wushishi, Niger State
Died13 February 1976

Colonel Ibrahim Taiwo (died February 13, 1976) was a Military Governor of Kwara State from July 1975 to February 1976 during the military regime of General Murtala Mohammed. [1] He assisted in establishment of the University of Ilorin, which was founded by decree August, 1975. [2]

Kwara State State in North Central, Nigeria

Kwara is a state in Western Nigeria. Its capital is Ilorin. Kwara is located within the North Central geopolitical zone, commonly referred to as the Middle Belt. The primary ethnic group is Yoruba, with significant Nupe, Bariba, and Fulani minorities.

Murtala Mohammed Nigerian politician and general

Murtala Rufai Ramat Muhammed was the military ruler of Nigeria from 1975 until his assassination in 1976.

University of Ilorin Public university in Kwara State, Nigeria

University of Ilorin, also known as Unilorin, is a federal government-owned university in Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria. It was established by a Decree of the Federal Military Government in August, 1975.. The establishment aimed to implement one of the educational directives of the Third National Development Plan which was aimed at providing more opportunities for Nigerians aspiring to acquire university education and to generate high-level manpower, so vital for the rapidly expanding economy. Compared to other higher institutions of learning in the country, the institution has one of the largest landmass covering approximately 5000 hectares of land.

Contents

Life

Taiwo was born in Wushishi, Niger State to the family of Adeosun and Emily Taiwo. He was brought up in Kagara and was sometimes called Ibrahim Kagara while he was in school. Taiwo's father was of Ogbomosho ancestry. Ibrahim Taiwo was educated at Senior Primary School, Minna, Bida Middle School, and briefly attended the Provincial Secondary School, Okene for his Higher School Certificate.

Wushishi is a Local Government Area in Niger State, Nigeria. Its headquarters are in the town of Wushishi.

Niger State State in Nigeria

Niger or Niger State is a state in Central Nigeria and the largest state in the country. The state capital is Minna, and other major cities are Bida, Kontagora, and Suleja. It was formed in 1976 when the then North-Western State was bifurcated into Niger State and Sokoto State. It is home to Ibrahim Babangida and Abdulsalami Abubakar, two of Nigeria's former military rulers. The Nupe, Gbagyi, Kamuku, Kambari, Dukawa, Hausa and Koro form the majority of numerous indigenous tribes of Niger State.

Ogbomosho Place in Oyo State, Nigeria

Ogbomosho is a city in Oyo State, south-western Nigeria, on the A1 highway. It was founded in the mid 17th century. The population was approximately 645,000 in 2006 census. The majority of the people are members of the Yoruba ethnic group. Yams, cassava, cashew, mango, maize, and tobacco are some of the notable agricultural products of the region.

Military career

Taiwo joined the military in 1961, he started military training at the Nigerian Military Training College, Kaduna and also attended Mons Officer Cadet School, Aldershot. While in the army, he served as a mechanical transport officer, Officer Commanding 2 Brigade Transport in Apapa, Staff Captain, Army Headquarters, Lagos, Officer in charge of 7 Brigade, Asaba and then Officer in charge of the Transport Company, Kaduna. During the Civil War, he was head of the transport and supplies division of the Nigerian Army.

Participation in the Nigerian Counter-Coup of July 1966

Taiwo, then a Captain with the Lagos Garrison in Yaba, was one of the many officers (including 2nd Lieutenant Sani Abacha, Lieutenant Muhammadu Buhari, Lieutenant Ibrahim Bako, Lt Colonel Murtala Muhammed, and Major Theophilus Danjuma among others), who staged what became known as the Nigerian Counter-Coup of 1966 because of grievances [3] they felt towards the administration of General Aguiyi Ironsi's government which quelled the 15 January 1966 coup.

Sani Abacha Military leader, politician

Sani Abacha was a Nigerian Army officer and dictator who served as the de facto President of Nigeria from 1993 until his death in 1998. He is also the first Nigerian soldier to attain the rank of a full star General without skipping a single rank.

Muhammadu Buhari Nigerian president

Muhammadu Buhari is a Nigerian politician currently serving as the President of Nigeria, in office since 2015. He is a retired major general in the Nigerian Army and previously served as the nation's head of state from 31 December 1983 to 27 August 1985, after taking power in a military coup d'état. The term Buharism is ascribed to the Buhari military government.

Brigadier Ibrahim Bako was a senior officer in the Nigerian Army who played a principal role in two Nigerian military coups: the July 1966 counter-coup and the December 1983 coup. The 1983 coup ousted the democratic government of Shehu Shagari while the July 1966 coup ousted the military government of General Ironsi. Bako was killed while attempting to arrest President Shehu Shagari during the December 1983 coup d'état.

During the Nigerian Civil War, Taiwo was one of the key figures in the Asaba massacre.

Nigerian Civil War Conflict

The Nigerian Civil War, also known as the Biafran War and the Nigerian-Biafran War, was a war fought between the government of Nigeria and the secessionist state of Biafra. Biafra represented nationalist aspirations of the Biafran people, whose leadership felt they could no longer coexist with the Northern-dominated federal government. The conflict resulted from political, economic, ethnic, cultural and religious tensions which preceded Britain's formal decolonization of Nigeria from 1960 to 1963. Immediate causes of the war in 1966 included ethno-religious riots in Northern Nigeria, a military coup, a counter-coup and persecution of Igbo living in Northern Nigeria. Control over the lucrative oil production in the Niger Delta played a vital strategic role.

Asaba massacre

The Asaba Massacre occurred in early October 1967, during the Biafran War, fought over the secession of Biafra. Asaba is ethnically and linguistically Igbo, but was never part of Biafra.

Participation in the Nigerian Military Coup of 1975

Taiwo played a central role in the coup that ousted Yakubu Gowon and brought Murtala Mohammed to power, under cover of his Supply and Transport duties in the army, working closely with Lt. Col. Muhammadu Buhari. [4]

Yakubu Gowon Nigerian politician and Military general

General Yakubu "Jack" Dan-Yumma Gowon is the former head of state of Nigeria from 1966 to 1975. He ruled during the deadly Nigerian Civil War, which caused the death of almost 3 million people, most which were civilians. He took power after one military coup d'état and was overthrown in another. During his rule, the Nigerian government was able to prevent the Biafran secession during the Civil War, (1967-70).

Casualty of the 1976 Military Coup

Colonel Ibrahim Taiwo was murdered on 13 February 1976 during a failed coup in which the then Head of State Gen. Murtala Mohammed was also killed. General Olusegun Obasanjo was later appointed as Head of State keeping the rest of Gen. Murtala Mohammed's Chain of command in place. [5]

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References

  1. "Nigerian States". WorldStatesmen. Retrieved 2010-01-02.
  2. "Welcome to the University of Ilorin". University of Ilorin. Retrieved 2010-01-02.
  3. Siollun, Max. Oil, Politics and Violence: Nigeria's Military Coup Culture (1966 - 1976). Algora. p. 97. ISBN   9780875867090.
  4. Nowa Omoigui. "Military Rebellion of July 29, 1975: The coup against Gowon - Part 6". Dawodu. Retrieved 2010-01-02.
  5. Max Siollun (2009). Oil, Politics and Violence: Nigeria's Military Coup Culture (1966-1976). Algora Publishing. ISBN   0-87586-708-1.