Ireland women's national rugby union team

Last updated

Ireland
Emblem Shamrock
Union Irish Rugby Football Union
Head coachAdam Griggs
CaptainCiara Griffin
Home stadium Donnybrook Stadium
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
World Rugby ranking
Current8 (as of 23 November 2020)
First international
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 10–0 Ireland  IRFU flag.svg
( Raeburn Place 14 February 1993)
Biggest win
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 3–73 Ireland  IRFU flag.svg
( Broadwood Stadium 22 March 2015)
Biggest defeat
Flag of England.svg  England 79–0 Ireland  IRFU flag.svg
( Worcester, England 17 February 2002)
World Cup
Appearances6 (First in 1994)
Best resultFourth, 2014
Website www.irishrugby.ie

The Ireland women's national rugby union team represents Ireland in international women's rugby union competitions such as the Women's Six Nations Championship and the Women's Rugby World Cup. They have also represented Ireland in the FIRA Women's European Championship. Ireland won the 2013 and 2015 Women's Six Nations Championships. In 2013 they also achieved both a Triple Crown and Grand Slam. They finished fourth in the 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup after defeating New Zealand in the pool stages. Ireland hosted the 2017 Women's Rugby World Cup. The team was originally organised by the Irish Women's Rugby Football Union. However, since 2009 it has been organised by the Irish Rugby Football Union

Contents

History

Early years

The Irish Women's Rugby Football Union was established in 1991. [1] Ireland made their international debut on 14 February 1993 with an away friendly against Scotland. This was also Scotland's first international. The match was played at Raeburn Place in front of a crowd of over 1,000. The Ireland team was coached by Alain Rolland while the Scotland coaches included Sandy Carmichael. Scotland won 10–0 with two tries from their captain, Sandra Colamartino. Ireland's first captain was Jill Henderson. A year later, on 13 February 1994, Ireland made their home international debut when a return match was played at Ravenhill. This time Scotland won 5–0. [2] [3] [4] In 2001 the IWRFU became affiliated to the Irish Rugby Football Union, in 2008 it effectively merged with the IRFU and since 2009 the IRFU has managed the women's national team. [1] [4] [5]

Rugby World Cup

Ireland have competed in every Women's Rugby World Cup since making their debut in the second tournament in 1994. They made their World Cup debut on 13 April 1994 with an 18–5 win against a Scottish Students XV. This was also Ireland's first competitive match in any competition.

Ireland's best performance at a World Cup tournament came in 2014 when they finished fourth after defeating New Zealand and winning Pool B. After defeating the United States 23–17 in their opening pool game, Ireland faced New Zealand, the 2010 Women's Rugby World Cup winners in their second game. With tries from Heather O'Brien and Alison Miller and two conversions and a penalty from Niamh Briggs, Ireland defeated New Zealand 17–14. It was just the second match New Zealand had lost in a World Cup tournament. It was the first time the Ireland women had played New Zealand and they became only the second Irish team, after Munster in 1978, to defeat a New Zealand national rugby union team. [6] [7] [8] The result has been described as "one of the biggest upsets in the tournament's history". [9] Ireland subsequently qualified for the semi-finals with a 40–5 win against Kazakhstan. [10] [11] Ireland eventually finished fourth in the tournament after losing 18–25 to France in the third place play-off. [12]

Six Nations Championship

National anthem line-up during the 2015 Women's Six Nations Championship Ireland Women during the 2015 RBS Six Nations.jpg
National anthem line-up during the 2015 Women's Six Nations Championship

Ireland made their debut in the Women's Six Nations Championship, then known as the Women's Home Nations Championship, in the inaugural 1996 competition. They played their first game against Scotland on 21 January 1996. [2] During the 1990s and early 2000s, Ireland never challenged for the championship. They regularly finished in the wooden spoon position at the bottom of the table. Before winning their first championship in 2013, the highest position they ever finished in the competition was third. They did not enter in 2000 and 2001 and were replaced by Spain. When Ireland returned in 2002, the competition became known as the Six Nations for the first time. In 2002 Ireland also suffered their biggest ever defeat when they lost 79–0 to England. Ireland won their first Six Nations match in 2005 when they defeated Wales 11–6. [1] Ireland defeated Scotland for the first time on 10 March 2007 with an 18–6 win at Meggetland. [2] In 2009 Ireland defeated France for the first time. [13]

Ireland won their first championship in 2013, winning both a Triple Crown and a Grand Slam at the same time. In their opening match of the campaign, Ireland beat Wales 12–10. Then on 9 February 2013 they defeated England for the first time. Alison Miller scored a hat-trick of tries as Ireland won 25–0. On 23 February 2013 they clinched their first Triple Crown with a 30–3 win against Scotland. [14] [15] [16] On 8 March 2013 Ireland effectively won the championship after they defeated France 15–10. It was confirmed the following day after Italy failed to defeat England. [17] [18] Ireland eventually finished four points clear of runners-up France. [19] Ireland secured the Grand Slam with a 6–3 away win against Italy on Saint Patrick's Day. Two penalties from Niamh Briggs gave Ireland their fifth win in a row. [19] [20] [21]

In 2015, Ireland won their second championship and second Triple Crown in three years. They won the championship on points difference over France, after both teams had won four of their five matches. Ireland had to win their final game, against Scotland, by a margin of 27 points or more to win the title and achieved this with a 73–3 win. The result is also Ireland's biggest ever win. [22] [23] [24]

FIRA Women's European Championship

Ireland has also competed in the FIRA Women's European Championship. They first played in the tournament in 1997. Their best performance in this tournament was a third-place finish in 2008. In 2004 they won the Plate competition after defeating Spain 20–12 in the final.

Current squad

2018 Women's Six Nations Championship squad

New head coach, Adam Griggs, [25] named his first Six Nations squad on 22 December 2017. It featured 38 players from 10 different clubs. It included nine uncapped players and nine Ireland women's rugby sevens internationals. The team was selected following the conclusion of the 2017 IRFU Women's Interprovincial Series. [26] Ciara Griffin of UL Bohemians and Munster was named as the new Ireland captain on 15 January 2018. [27]

PlayerPositionDate of Birth/AgeCapsClubProvince
Niamh Briggs Fullback (1984-09-30)30 September 1984 (aged 33)57 Flag of Munster.svg UL Bohemians ||Munster
Nikki Caughey Centre (1992-09-03)3 September 1992 (aged 25)10 Flag of Leinster.svg Railway Union ||Ulster
Michelle Claffey Back Flag of Leinster.svg Blackrock College ||Leinster
Laura Sheehan Wing Flag of Munster.svg UL Bohemians ||Munster
Nicole Cronin Back (1992-08-20)20 August 1992 (aged 25) Flag of Munster.svg UL Bohemians ||Munster
Jeamie Deacon Back (1987-06-25)25 June 1987 (aged 30) Flag of Leinster.svg Blackrock College ||Leinster
Katie Fitzhenry Hooker (1989-04-23)23 April 1989 (aged 28) Flag of Leinster.svg Blackrock College ||Leinster
Ellen Murphy Back Flag of Leinster.svg Old Belvedere ||Leinster
Louise Galvin Centre (1987-04-03)3 April 1987 (aged 30) Flag of Munster.svg UL Bohemians ||Munster
Katie Heffernan Back (1998-09-08)8 September 1998 (aged 19) Flag of Leinster.svg Railway Union ||Leinster
Eve Higgins Back Flag of Leinster.svg Railway Union ||Leinster
Ailsa Hughes Scrum-half (1991-04-18)18 April 1991 (aged 26)2 Flag of Leinster.svg Railway Union ||Leinster
Claire McLaughlin Centre (1991-11-21)21 November 1991 (aged 26)6 Flag of Ulster.svg Old Belvedere ||Ulster
Alison Miller Wing (1984-10-30)30 October 1984 (aged 33)36 Flag of Leinster.svg Old Belvedere ||Connacht
Sene Naoupu Centre (1984-02-02)2 February 1984 (aged 34) Flag of Leinster.svg Old Belvedere ||Leinster
Deirbhile Nic A Bhaird Back Flag of Munster.svg Old Belvedere ||Munster
Hannah Tyrrell Wing (1990-08-10)10 August 1990 (aged 27)7 Flag of Leinster.svg Old Belvedere ||Leinster
Susan Vaughan Back (1990-07-24)24 July 1990 (aged 27) Flag of Leinster.svg Railway Union ||Leinster
Megan Williams Back (1991-08-21)21 August 1991 (aged 26)18 Flag of Leinster.svg Old Belvedere ||Leinster
Ashleigh Baxter Forward (1991-12-21)21 December 1991 (aged 26) Flag of Ulster.svg Cooke ||Ulster
Anna Caplice Forward (1989-03-13)13 March 1989 (aged 28)1 Flag of England.svg Richmond Munster
Ciara Cooney Forward (1988-01-18)18 January 1988 (aged 30)12 Flag of Leinster.svg Railway Union ||Leinster
Laura Feely Forward Flag of Connacht.svg Galwegians ||Connacht
Nichola Fryday Forward (1995-06-02)2 June 1995 (aged 22)2 Flag of Leinster.svg Tullamore ||Connacht
Ciara Griffin Flanker (1994-01-10)10 January 1994 (aged 24)11 Flag of Munster.svg UL Bohemians ||Munster
Leah Lyons Prop (1994-11-27)27 November 1994 (aged 23)23 Flag of England.svg Harlequins ||Munster
Aoife McDermott Forward Flag of Leinster.svg Railway Union ||Leinster
Edel McMahon Forward (1994-03-25)25 March 1994 (aged 23) Flag of Connacht.svg Galwegians ||Connacht
Claire Molloy Flanker (1988-06-22)22 June 1988 (aged 29)53 Flag of England.svg Wasps ||Connacht
Cliodhna Moloney Hooker (1993-05-31)31 May 1993 (aged 24)8 Flag of England.svg Wasps ||Leinster
Lindsay Peat Prop (1980-11-05)5 November 1980 (aged 37)6 Flag of Leinster.svg Railway Union ||Leinster
Fiona Reidy Prop (1988-03-12)12 March 1988 (aged 29)6 Flag of Munster.svg UL Bohemians ||Munster

Source: [26] [28]

Results summary

Full internationals only

Correct as of 24 April 2021 [29]

AgainstFirst gamePlayedWonDrawnLostWin %
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 1998410325.00%
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2002310233.33%
Flag of England.svg  England 199629202706.90%
Flag of France.svg  France 199329312510.34%
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 19973300100.00%
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 199719170289.47%
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1994430175.00%
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 1998520340.00%
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 19983300100.00%
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 2014210150.00%
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 200210010.00%
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1993291401548.28%
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 20061100100.00%
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1997940544.44%
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1994720528.57%
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 1996281201642.86%
Total199317669110639.20%

Results

See List of Ireland women's national rugby union team matches

Head coaches

Years
Alain Rolland [3] 1993
Johnnie Neary1998
Philip Doyle2003–2006
John O’Sullivan2006–2008
Steven Hennessy [13] 2009–2010
Philip Doyle 2010–2014
Tom Tierney 2014–2017
Adam Griggs [25] 2017–

Honours

Related Research Articles

Ireland national rugby union team Irish national rugby union team

The Ireland national rugby union team is the representative national team in the sport of rugby union for the island of Ireland. The team represents both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. Ireland competes in the annual Six Nations Championship and in the Rugby World Cup. Ireland is one of the four unions that make up the British & Irish Lions – players eligible to play for Ireland are also eligible for the Lions.

Ronan OGara Rugby player

Ronan John Ross O'Gara is an Irish former rugby union player and current coach. O'Gara played as a fly-half and is Ireland's second most-capped player and highest ever points scorer. He is currently head coach of La Rochelle in the French Top 14.

Donncha OCallaghan Rugby player

Donncha O'Callaghan is an Irish retired rugby union player. He began his career with his home province Munster, spending 17 seasons with the province and winning 5 major trophies, before finishing his career with Worcester Warriors in the English Premiership. Internationally, O'Callaghan represented Ireland and was part of the team that won the Six Nations grand slam in 2009. He also toured with the British & Irish Lions in 2005 and 2009, winning 4 caps, and was invited the play for the Barbarians twice. Throughout his career, O'Callaghan played primarily as a lock, though he occasionally provided cover at blindside flanker.

Paul OConnell Rugby player

Paul Jeremiah O'Connell is an Irish former rugby union player. When he stopped playing, he was Ireland's third most-capped player (108) and the eighteenth most-capped international player in rugby union history. During his career, O'Connell captained Munster, Ireland and the British & Irish Lions. He is now the forwards coach for the Ireland national men's team.

Peter Stringer Rugby player

Peter Alexander Stringer is an Irish former rugby union player who played at scrum-half. He spent 15 seasons with Irish province Munster, during which time he had loan spells with English teams Saracens and Newcastle, before moving to England with Bath, Sale and Worcester. Internationally, Stringer represented Ireland and the Barbarians. He announced his retirement from rugby in June 2018.

David Peter Wallace is a retired Irish rugby union player, who played for Munster, Ireland and the British & Irish Lions. He normally played as an openside flanker, but could also play blindside flanker and number 8.

Donnacha Ryan Rugby player

Donnacha Ryan is an Irish rugby union player for French side Racing 92 in the Top 14 and European Rugby Champions Cup. Ryan plays primarily as a lock, but has also played as a flanker.

Phillip Michael Matthews is a former Ireland rugby union international. He was a member of the Ireland team that won the 1985 Five Nations Championship and the Triple Crown. He represented Ireland at the 1987 and 1991 Rugby World Cups. He also played for both the British and Irish Lions and the Barbarians. He captained both Ireland and the Barbarians. He subsequently served as a rugby union co-commentator with BBC Sport and TV3. Between 2010 and 2016 he served as the President of the National College of Ireland. His daughter, Hannah Matthews, is an Ireland women's field hockey international and played in the 2018 Women's Hockey World Cup final.

The 2013 Women's Six Nations Championship, also known as the 2013 RBS Women's Six Nations, due to the tournament been sponsored by the Royal Bank of Scotland, was the 12th series of the annual women's rugby union competition. Matches were held in February and March 2013, on the same weekends as the men's tournament.

Niamh Briggs is an Ireland women's rugby union international. She represented Ireland at the 2010 and 2014 Women's Rugby World Cups. She was also a member of the Ireland teams that won the 2013 and 2015 Women's Six Nations Championships. Briggs was a member of the first Ireland teams to defeat France, England and New Zealand. She was captain of the Ireland team when they won the 2015 Six Nations title and was the top points scorer during both the 2013 and 2015 Six Nations championships. Briggs is also an Ireland women's rugby sevens international and has also played senior Ladies' Gaelic football for Waterford. Briggs is a Garda Síochána officer based in Limerick.

Tadhg Furlong is an Irish rugby union player for Leinster in the Pro14 and European Rugby Champions Cup. His preferred position is tighthead prop. Internationally, Furlong has represented Ireland and, in 2017, the British & Irish Lions.

Fiona Coghlan is a former Ireland women's rugby union international. Coghlan represented Ireland at the 2006, 2010 and 2014 Women's Rugby World Cups. She also captained the Ireland team that won the 2013 Women's Six Nations Championship. In 2013 Coghlan was named The Irish Times / Irish Sports Council Sportswoman of the Year after captaining Ireland to their first ever Six Nations, Grand Slam and Triple Crown titles. Coghlan was a member of the first Ireland teams to defeat France, England and New Zealand. She was the Ireland captain on the latter two occasions. In addition to captaining Ireland, Coghlan also captained her club team, UL Bohemians, her provincial team, Leinster and was captain of the first ever Barbarians women's team.

Nora Stapleton is a former Ireland women's rugby union international. Stapleton represented Ireland at the 2010, 2014 and 2017 Women's Rugby World Cups. She was also a member of the Ireland teams that won the 2013 and 2015 Women's Six Nations Championships. Stapleton was a member of the first Ireland teams to defeat both England and New Zealand. Stapleton has also played two other football codes at a senior level. As a women's association football player, she played for UCD in FAI Women's Cup finals and UEFA Women's Cup campaigns. She has also played senior Ladies' Gaelic football for Donegal.

Claire Molloy is an Ireland women's rugby union international from Galway. Molloy represented Ireland at the 2010, 2014 and 2017 Women's Rugby World Cups. At the 2014 tournament she was a member of the Ireland team that defeated New Zealand and she captained Ireland at the 2017 tournament. She was also a member of the Ireland teams that won the 2013 and 2015 Women's Six Nations Championships. She is also an Ireland women's rugby sevens international and captained the Ireland team at the 2013 Rugby World Cup Sevens. Molloy also played Ladies' Gaelic football for Galway and featured in the 2005 All-Ireland Senior Ladies' Football Championship Final.

Fiona Hayes is a former Ireland women's rugby union international. She was a member of the Ireland teams that won the 2013 and 2015 Women's Six Nations Championships. She was also a member of the Ireland team that defeated New Zealand at the 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup. Hayes has also played association football at intervarsity and intermediate level.

Sophie Spence is a former Ireland women's rugby union international. Spence represented Ireland at the 2014 and 2017 Women's Rugby World Cups. Spence was a member of the first Ireland teams to defeat England and New Zealand. She was also a member of the Ireland teams that won the 2013 and 2015 Women's Six Nations Championships. Spence is a British Nigerian who qualified to represent Ireland through her mother, who was originally from Lisburn, County Antrim.

The history of the Ireland national rugby union team began in 1875, when Ireland played its first international match, a 0–7 loss against England. Ireland has competed in the Six Nations rugby tournament since 1883. The Ireland national rugby union team has also competed at the Rugby World Cup every four years since its inception in 1987.

Jacob Stockdale Rugby player

Jacob Stockdale is an Irish professional rugby union player who currently plays for Ulster and for Ireland. He plays on the wing or at fullback.

Joy Neville Irish rugby union footballer and referee

Joy Neville is a former Ireland women's rugby union international and a current rugby union referee. As a player Neville represented Ireland at both the 2006 and 2010 Women's Rugby World Cups. In 2009 Neville captained the first Ireland team to defeat France. In 2013 she was also a member of the first Ireland women's team to win the Six Nations, Grand Slam and Triple Crown titles.

Hannah Tyrrell is an Ireland women's rugby union international. Tyrrell represented Ireland at the 2017 Women's Rugby World Cup. She was also a member of the Ireland team that won the 2015 Women's Six Nations Championship. Tyrrell is also an Ireland women's rugby sevens international. She has also played two other football codes at a senior level. As a women's association football player, Tyrrell played for St Catherine's in two FAI Women's Cup finals and played for Shamrock Rovers in the Women's National League. She also played senior Ladies' Gaelic football for Dublin in the Ladies' National Football League.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "'Women who participated in other traditional 'male' sports used to be regarded as some sort of sexual deviants'". The Irish Independent. 6 August 2017. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  2. 1 2 3 "Ireland and Scotland celebrate 25 years". scrumqueens.com. 14 February 2018. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  3. 1 2 "Pioneers celebrate 25th anniversary of first Scotland women's international". theoffsideline.com. 14 February 2018. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  4. 1 2 "Women's Teams Reunite To Mark 25th Anniversary". irishrugby.ie. 14 February 2018. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  5. "Ireland's new Call". The Irish Independent. 30 July 2017. Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  6. "Black Ferns lose historic match to Ireland". allblacks.com. 6 August 2014. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  7. "Women's Rugby World Cup 2014: Ireland stun four-time champions New Zealand". The Daily Telegraph. 5 August 2014. Retrieved 28 February 2018.
  8. "Irish women's rugby team record historic win over New Zealand". The Irish Independent. 5 August 2014. Retrieved 28 February 2018.
  9. "Women's Rugby World Cup: The story so far". rwcwomens.com. 4 August 2017. Retrieved 28 February 2018.
  10. "Ireland crush Kazakhstan to book World Cup semi-final spot". Raidió Teilifís Éireann. 9 August 2014. Retrieved 28 February 2018.
  11. "The history makers: behind the scenes with Ireland's women". BBC. 7 August 2014. Retrieved 22 March 2015.
  12. "France too strong for Ireland in playoffs". emeraldrugby.com. 18 August 2014. Retrieved 28 February 2018.
  13. 1 2 "Women Secure First Ever Victory Over France". irishrugby.ie. 6 February 2009. Archived from the original on 29 December 2017. Retrieved 27 December 2017.
  14. "Miller hat-trick hands Ireland historic win over England". sixnationsrugby.com. 9 February 2013. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  15. "Women's Six Nations: Ireland beat Scotland to win Triple Crown". BBC. 23 February 2013. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  16. "In pictures: Ireland's women capture first ever Triple Crown". the42.ie. 23 February 2013. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  17. "Ireland sink France to close in on RBS 6 Nations Grand Slam". sixnationsrugby.com. 8 March 2013. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  18. "Ireland v France – Women's Six Nations Rugby Championship Photos". sportsfile.com. 8 March 2013. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  19. 1 2 "Women's Six Nations: Champions Ireland complete Grand Slam". BBC. 17 March 2013. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  20. "Grand Slam Glory For Ireland Women". irishrugby.ie. 17 March 2013. Archived from the original on 26 July 2018. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  21. "Narrow win secures Grand Slam for Irish women". The Irish Times. 17 March 2013. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  22. "Women's Six Nations: Ireland hammer Scotland to clinch title". BBC. 22 March 2015. Retrieved 22 March 2015.
  23. "Biggest Ever Win Seals Six Nations Title For Ireland Women". irishrugby.ie. 22 March 2015. Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  24. "Ireland Women Crowned 6 Nations Champions". leinsterrugby.ie. 22 March 2015. Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  25. 1 2 "Griggs Appointed Ireland Women's Head Coach". irishrugby.ie. 10 November 2017. Retrieved 6 February 2018.
  26. 1 2 "Ireland Women's Squad Announced For 2018 Six Nations". irishrugby.ie. 22 December 2017. Retrieved 4 March 2018.
  27. "'Natural leader' Ciara Griffin named as Ireland Women's captain". The Irish Times. 15 January 2018. Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  28. "Ireland Women Squad". irishrugby.ie. Retrieved 4 March 2018.
  29. "Fixtures & Results". Irish Rugby. Retrieved 18 April 2021.