Latvia–United States relations

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Latvia – United States relations
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Latvia
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United States
Embassy of Latvia in Washington, D.C. Embassy of Latvia, Washington, D.C..jpg
Embassy of Latvia in Washington, D.C.

Latvia–United States relations are bilateral relations between Latvia and the United States.

Latvia Republic in Northeastern Europe

Latvia, officially known as the Republic of Latvia, is a country in the Baltic region of the Northern part of Eastern Europe. Since its independence, Latvia has been referred to as one of the Baltic states. It is bordered by Estonia to the north, Lithuania to the south, Russia to the east, and Belarus to the southeast, and shares a maritime border with Sweden to the west. Latvia has 1,957,200 inhabitants and a territory of 64,589 km2 (24,938 sq mi). The country has a temperate seasonal climate. The Baltic Sea moderates seasons, although it has four distinct ones and snowy winters.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or simply America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe. Most of the country is located in central North America between Canada and Mexico. With an estimated population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City.

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History

The United States established diplomatic relations with Latvia on July 28, 1922. The U.S. Legation in Riga was officially established on November 13, 1922, and served as the headquarters for U.S. representation in the Baltics during the interwar era. The Soviet invasion forced the closure of the legation on September 5, 1940, but Latvian representation in the United States has continued uninterrupted for 85 years. The United States never recognized the forcible incorporation of Latvia into the U.S.S.R. and views the present government of Latvia as a legal continuation of the interwar republic.

Riga City in Latvia

Riga is the capital of Latvia and is home to 632,614 inhabitants (2019), which is a third of Latvia's population. Being significantly larger than other cities of Latvia, Riga is the country's primate city. It is also the largest city in the three Baltic states and is home to one tenth of the three Baltic states' combined population. The city lies on the Gulf of Riga at the mouth of the Daugava river where it meets the Baltic Sea. Riga's territory covers 307.17 km2 (118.60 sq mi) and lies 1–10 m above sea level, on a flat and sandy plain.

Current status

Latvia and the United States have signed treaties on investment, trade, intellectual property protection, extradition, mutual legal assistance, and avoidance of double taxation. Latvia has enjoyed most-favored-nation treatment with the United States since December 1991.

To invest is to allocate money in the expectation of some benefit in the future.

Extradition is an act where one jurisdiction delivers a person accused or convicted of committing a crime in another jurisdiction, over to their law enforcement. It is a cooperative law enforcement process between the two jurisdictions and depends on the arrangements made between them. Besides the legal aspects of the process, extradition also involves the physical transfer of custody of the person being extradited to the legal authority of the requesting jurisdiction.

Double taxation is the levying of tax by two or more jurisdictions on the same declared income, asset, or financial transaction. Double liability is mitigated in a number of ways, for example:

According to the 2012 U.S. Global Leadership Report, 30% of Latvians approve of U.S. leadership, with 30% disapproving and 39% uncertain. [1]

Latvians Ethnic group

Latvians are a Baltic ethnic group and nation native to Latvia and the immediate geographical region, the Baltics. They are occasionally also referred to as Letts, although this term is becoming obsolete. Latvians share a common Latvian language, culture and history.

Principal U.S. Embassy Officials include:

An ambassador is an official envoy, especially a high-ranking diplomat who represents a state and is usually accredited to another sovereign state or to an international organization as the resident representative of their own government or sovereign or appointed for a special and often temporary diplomatic assignment. The word is also often used more liberally for persons who are known, without national appointment, to represent certain professions, activities and fields of endeavor such as sales.

The U.S. Embassy in Latvia is located in Riga.

Country comparison

Flag of Latvia.svg Latvia Flag of the United States.svg United States
Flag Flag of Latvia.svg Flag of the United States.svg
Coat of Arms Coat of Arms of Latvia.svg Great Seal of the United States (obverse).svg
Population1,953,200 [2] 330,235,000
Area64,589 km2 (24,938 sq mi)9,526,468 km2 (3,678,190 sq mi) [3]
Population density34.3/km² (88.9/sq mi)31/km² (80/sq mi)
Capital Riga Washington, D.C.
Largest cityRiga - 641,423 (1,018,295 Metro) New York City – 8,175,133 (19,006,798 Metro)
Government Unitary parliamentary constitutional republic Federal presidential constitutional republic
First Leader Jānis Čakste George Washington
Current Leader Egils Levits Donald Trump
Official languages Latvian English (de facto)
Main religions80% Christianity (34.3% Lutheranism, 25.1% Catholicism, 19.4% Eastern Orthodoxy/Old Believers, 1.2% other Christian), 20% non-Religious70.6% Christianity (46.5% Protestantism, 20.8% Catholicism, 1.6% Mormonism, 1.7% Other Christianity), 22.8% non-Religious, 1.9% Judaism, 0.9% Islam, 0.7% Buddhism, 0.7% Hinduism [4]
Ethnic groups62% Latvian, 25.4% Russian, 3.3% Belarusian, 2.2% Ukrainian, 2.1% Polish, 1.2% Lithuanian, 3.8% other [5] 74% White American, 13.4% African American,
6.5% Some other race, 4.4% Asian American, 2% Two or more races,
0.7% Native American or Native Alaskan, 0.14% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
GDP (nominal)$30.176 billion ($15,403 per capita)$14.4 trillion ($47,440 per capita)
GDP (PPP)$53.467 billion ($27,291 per capita)$18.558 trillion ($57,220 per capita)
Real GDP growth rate 2.00%1.60%

See also

Latvian Americans are Americans who are of Latvian ancestry. According to the 2008 American Community Survey, there are 93,498 Americans of full or partial Latvian descent.

Foreign relations of the United States Overview of American international relations

The United States has formal diplomatic relations with most nations. This includes all UN member states and UN observer states other than (i) UN member states Bhutan, Iran, North Korea and Syria and (ii) the UN observer State of Palestine. Additionally, the U.S. has diplomatic relations with the European Union and Kosovo. The United States federal statutes relating to foreign relations can be found in Title 22 of the United States Code.

Foreign relations of Latvia

The foreign relations of Latvia are the primary responsibility of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Today's Republic of Latvia regards itself as a continuation of the 1918–1940 republic. After the declaration on the restoration of its full independence on August 21, 1991, Latvia became a member of the United Nations on September 17, 1991, and is a signatory to a number of UN organizations and other international agreements. Latvia welcomes further cooperation and integration with NATO, European Union, OECD and other Western organizations. It also seeks more active participation in UN peacekeeping efforts worldwide.

Related Research Articles

Anatols Dinbergs was one of the preeminent career diplomats of Latvia. He entered service in Latvia's Foreign Ministry in 1932. Dinbergs remained abroad when the Soviet Union occupied Latvia, serving in the Latvian Legation in Washington, D.C., after World War II ended. Dinbergs assumed the highest diplomatic post, that of chargé d'affaires, in 1970 and represented Latvia's sovereign interests in exile until Latvia reestablished its independence in 1991. As head of the Latvian diplomatic service abroad, Dinbergs was appointed Latvia's first ambassador to the United Nations and subsequently Latvia's first ambassador to the United States. After retirement, he served as Counselor to the Latvian Embassy in Washington, D.C., until his death in 1993.

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The Embassy of the United States in Tallinn, Estonia, is located at the chancery building on Kentmanni Street. This building housed the U.S. Legation to Estonia from April 1, 1930 until September 5, 1940. The U.S. Mission to Estonia resumed operations in the same building on February 6, 1992.

References

  1. U.S. Global Leadership Project Report - 2012 Gallup
  2. "The number of population is decreasing – the mark has dropped below 2 million". Central Statistical Bureau of Latvia. Nov 2015. Archived from the original on 2017-10-14. Retrieved 6 May 2014.
  3. "United States". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 31 January 2010.
  4. "America's Changing Religious Landscape". Pew Research Center. Pew Research Center. 2015-05-12. Retrieved September 4, 2016.
  5. [ dead link ]

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Department of State website https://2009-2017.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/5378.htm .