Mostyn baronets

Last updated

Gloddaeth Hall, Conwy: the hall, with Mostyn family portraits The Hall, Gloddaeth Hall - geograph.org.uk - 1356085.jpg
Gloddaeth Hall, Conwy: the hall, with Mostyn family portraits

The Mostyn baronets [1] are two lines of Welsh baronets holding baronetcies created in 1660 and 1670, both in the Baronetage of England. One creation is extant as of 2015. The two lines are related and both claim descent from Edwin of Tegeingl, an 11th-century lord of Tegeingl, [2] a territory which approximates modern Flintshire.

Contents

Mostyn of Mostyn

Plas Mostyn. The original seat of the Mostyn family, 1793 Plas Mostyn, 1793.jpg
Plas Mostyn. The original seat of the Mostyn family, 1793

The Mostyn Baronetcy, of Mostyn in the County of Flint, was created in the Baronetage of England on 3 August 1660 for Roger Mostyn. [3] The second Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for Caernarfon. The third Baronet represented Flintshire, Flint and Cheshire in the House of Commons and served as Lord-Lieutenant of Flintshire. The fourth, fifth and sixth Baronets all sat as Members of Parliament for Flintshire. The fifth Baronet was also Lord-Lieutenant of Flintshire. The title became extinct on the death of the sixth Baronet in 1831. Elizabeth, sister of the sixth Baronet, married Sir Edward Pryce Lloyd, 2nd Baronet. In 1831 he was created Baron Mostyn, to which the Lloyd Mostyn Baronetcy is a subsidiary title. [4]

Mostyn of Talacre

Mostyn Hall Mostyn 02554.jpg
Mostyn Hall
Talacre Hall N.W. view of Talacre, Flintshire. The seat of Sir E. Mostyn, Bart.jpeg
Talacre Hall

The Mostyn Baronetcy, of Talacre in the County of Flint, was created in the Baronetage of England on 28 April 1670 for Edward Mostyn. [5] This family descends from Richard ap Hewell, who was seated at Mostyn in the reign of King Henry VIII. His son, Pyers Mostyn, of Talacre, was the great-grandfather of the first Baronet. Charles Mostyn, son of Charles Mostyn, second son of the fifth Baronet, married Mary Lucinda (née Butler) (died 1831), a descendant of Mary, eldest sister of Henry Vaux, 5th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (on whose death in 1663 the barony fell into abeyance). In 1838 the barony of Vaux of Harrowden was called out of abeyance in favour of their son George Charles Mostyn, who became the sixth Baron. See the Baron Vaux of Harrowden for further history of this branch of the family.

Two other members of the family may also be mentioned. The Most Reverend Francis Mostyn, fourth son of the eighth Baronet, was Roman Catholic Archbishop of Cardiff. Sir (Joseph) David Frederick Mostyn (1928–2007), great-grandson of Captain Edward Henry Mostyn, second son of the seventh Baronet, was a General in the Royal Green Jackets.

The family sold the Talacre estate in 1919.

List of Mostyn baronets, of Mostyn (1660)

Escutcheon of the Mostyn baronets of Mostyn MostynArms.svg
Escutcheon of the Mostyn baronets of Mostyn

List of Mostyn baronets, of Talacre (1670)

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Rohan Jeremy Mostyn (born 2012), son of the 15th Baronet.

See also

Related Research Articles

Baron Vaux of Harrowden Title in the Peerage of England

Baron Vaux of Harrowden is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1523 for Sir Nicholas Vaux. The barony was created by writ, which means that it can pass through both male and female lines. Vaux was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He was a poet and member of the courts of Henry VIII and Edward VI. The Vaux family was related to queen consort Catherine Parr by the first baron's two wives; Elizabeth FitzHugh and Anne Green. On the death in 1663 of his great-grandson, the fifth Baron, the title fell into abeyance between the late Baron's surviving sister Joyce, and the heirs of his deceased sisters Mary, Lady Symeon, and Catherine, Baroness Abergavenny.

Baron Mostyn, of Mostyn in the County of Flint, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1831 for Sir Edward Lloyd, 2nd Baronet, who had earlier represented Flint Boroughs and Beaumaris in the House of Commons. His son, the second Baron, sat as a Member of Parliament for Flintshire and Lichfield and served as Lord Lieutenant of Merionethshire.

The Bishopp Baronetcy, of Parham in the County of Sussex, was a baronetcy in the Baronetage of England. From around 1780 the name was sometimes also spelled Bisshopp. It was created 24 July 1620 for Sir Thomas Bishopp who had previously represented Gatton in Parliament. He was by then almost 70 years old and who had earlier been created a knight by King James I on 7 May 1603 at Theobalds, shortly after James's accession to the throne. Thomas Bishopp was the son of Thomas Bishopp and Elizabeth Belknap, heir and daughter of Sir Edward Belknap, who was active in the service of the English crown, both on the battlefield and as a court official.

Hanmer baronets

There have been two baronetcies created for members of the Hanmer family of Flintshire, Wales, one in the Baronetage of England and one in the Baronetage of Great Britain. Only one creation is extant as of 2008. The third Baronet of the second creation was elevated to the peerage as Baron Hanmer in 1872, a title which became extinct in 1881. The family name derived from the manor of Hanmer in the Diocese of St. Asaph.

Dashwood baronets

There have been two baronetcies created for members of the Dashwood family, one in the Baronetage of England and one in the Baronetage of Great Britain. Both creations are extant as of 2008.

The Bridges Baronetcy, of Goodnestone in the County of Kent, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 19 April 1718 for Brook Bridges. His son the second Baronet, died in 1733 whilst in office as High Sheriff of Kent. His grandson, the third Baronet, represented Kent in the House of Commons. In 1842, the fifth Baronet, unsuccessfully claimed the ancient barony of FitzWalter as a descendant of Mary, sister of the seventeenth Baron FitzWalter. He later sat as a Member of Parliament for Kent East. In 1868 he was created Baron FitzWalter, of Woodham Walter in the County of Essex, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. However, the peerage became extinct on his death, while he was succeeded in the baronetcy by his younger brother, the sixth Baronet. On his death the title passed to his first cousin, the seventh Baronet. He was the son of Reverend Brook Henry Bridges, third son of the third Baronet. When he died this line of the family also failed and the title was passed on to his first cousin, the eighth Baronet. He was the son of Reverend Brook Edward Bridges, fourth son of the third Baronet. He never married and on his death in 1899 the baronetcy became extinct.

Williams baronets

There have been twenty baronetcies created for persons with the surname Williams, eight in the Baronetage of England, three in the Baronetage of Great Britain and nine in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. Only five of the creations are extant as of 2017..

Edward Lloyd, 1st Baron Mostyn

Edward Pryce Lloyd, 1st Baron Mostyn, known as Sir Edward Lloyd, 2nd Baronet from 1795 to 1831, was a British politician.

This article is about the particular significance of the year 1831 to Wales and its people.

Fleetwood baronets

There have been two baronetcies created for members of the Fleetwood family, an old Lancashire family, one in the Baronetage of England and one in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. Both creations are extinct.

This is a list of High Sheriffs of Flintshire.

Sir Pyers Charles Mostyn, 10th Baronet was an English baronet.

Sir Roger Mostyn, 3rd Baronet, of Mostyn Hall, Holywell, Flintshire, was a Welsh Tory politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons for 25 years from 1701 to 1735.

William Vaux, 3rd Baron Vaux of Harrowden

William Vaux, 3rd Baron Vaux of Harrowden was an English peer. He was noted for his Roman Catholic faith and support of Catholic missionary activity.

Edward Vaux, 4th Baron Vaux of Harrowden was an English peer. He was the son of George Vaux (1564–1594) and his wife Elizabeth Vaux, and the grandson and heir of William Vaux, 3rd Baron Vaux of Harrowden. He succeeded his grandfather as Baron Vaux of Harrowden in August 1595, just before his seventh birthday.

There have been two baronetcies created, both in the Baronetage of England, for members of the Twysden family of Kent.

Sir John Hanmer, 3rd Baronet was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1659 and 1690.

Sir Roger Mostyn, 5th Baronet was a Welsh landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons for 38 years from 1758 to 1796.

Sir Thomas Mostyn, 6th Baronet Welsh MP

Sir Thomas Mostyn, 6th Baronet of Mostyn Hall, Flintshire and Gloddaeth Hall, Caernarvonshire, was a Welsh Member of Parliament.

Sir Thomas Mostyn, 4th Baronet, of Mostyn, Flintshire, was a British landowner and Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1734 and 1758.

References

  1. Davies, William Llewelyn (1959). "MOSTYN family of Mostyn Hall, Flintshire". Dictionary of Welsh Biography . National Library of Wales.
  2. Davies, William Llewelyn. "Edwin of Tegeingl". Dictionary of Welsh Biography. National Library of Wales. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  3. Cokayne, George Edward, ed. (1903). "Complete Baronetage volume 3 (1649-1664)". Exeter: W. Pollard & co. Retrieved 9 October 2018.
  4. "Official Roll of the Baronetage". Standing Council of the Baronetage. Archived from the original on 6 March 2015.
  5. Cokayne, George Edward, ed. (1904), Complete Baronetage volume 4 (1665-1707), vol. 4, Exeter: William Pollard and Co, retrieved 2 February 2019