People's Party of Tibet

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People's Party of Tibet

བོད་ཀྱི་མིམང་ཆབསྲིད་ཚོགས་པ།
PresidentTenzin Rabgyal
Founded2011 (2011)
Headquarters Dharamsala, India
Ideology Liberalism
Middle Way Approach
Political position Centre to centre-left
Seats in Parliament
14 / 43

The People's Party of Tibet is a political party in the Tibetan government in exile, officially the Central Tibetan Administration, based in India. In May 2011, Tenzin Rabgyal founded the People's Party of Tibet in an effort to bring plurality to the democratic process for Tibetans. The party currently holds 14 seats in the Tibetan parliament. [1]

The party endorsed Tashi Wangdu for the 2016 general election.

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References

  1. Cornelius Lundsgaard, Tibetan Parliament in Exile To See First Ever Opposition Party, The Tibet Post International 18 May 2011