Pyramid G1-b

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Pyramid G1-b
Meritetis-pyramide.jpg
Owner Meritites I or Noubet
Location Giza Governorate, Egypt Blue pencil.svg
Coordinates 29°58′42″N31°8′10″E / 29.97833°N 31.13611°E / 29.97833; 31.13611
Ancient name G1-a
Constructed Fourth Dynasty
Type True pyramid
Height 30 metres (98 ft)
Base 50 metres (160 ft)
Egypt adm location map.svg
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Location of pyramid in Egypt
Cave of Pyramid G1-b Pyramide-meritites-kheops.jpg
Cave of Pyramid G1-b

G1-b is one of the subsidiary pyramids of the Giza East Field of the Giza Necropolis immediately to the eastern side of the Great Pyramid of Giza, built during the Fourth dynasty of Egypt. It is the central of the three pyramids of the queens, located ten meters south of the Pyramid G1-a. It has a base of 50 meters and had an original height of 30 meters. Egyptologists Mark Lehner and Rainer Stadelmann attribute it to the queen Meritites I. Zahi Hawass, however, attributes it to Queen Noubet who gave birth to Djedefre.

Giza East Field Cemetery in Egypt

The East Field is located to the east of Khufu's pyramid and contains cemetery G 7000. This cemetery was a burial place for some of the family members of Khufu. The cemetery also includes mastabas from tenants and priests of the pyramids dated to the 5th dynasty and 6th dynasty.

Great Pyramid of Giza oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis and it is one of the seven wonders in the world

The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza pyramid complex bordering present-day El Giza, Egypt. It is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to remain largely intact.

Pyramid G1-a building in Egypt

G1-a is one of the subsidiary pyramids of the Giza East Field of the Giza Necropolis, located immediately to the eastern side of the Great Pyramid of Giza. It was built during the Fourth dynasty of Egypt. The tomb is the northernmost of the three pyramids of the queens and has a base of 49.5 metres (162 ft) wide and originally a height of 30.25 metres (99.2 ft); the pyramid has lost two-thirds of its original height. In the west wall of the burial chamber a small niche was dug in which were found fragments of basalt. It is also known as the Pyramid of Hetepheres I as discovered by Mark Lehner; it was originally thought to belong to Queen Meritites I.

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Mark Lehner is an American archaeologist with more than 30 years of experience excavating in Egypt. He was born in North Dakota in 1950. His approach, as director of Ancient Egypt Research Associates (AERA), is to conduct interdisciplinary archaeological investigation. Every excavated object is examined by specialists to create an overall picture of an archaeological site—from the buildings down to the pollen spores. His international team currently runs the Giza Plateau Mapping Project, excavating and mapping the ancient city of the builders of the Giza pyramid complex, which dates to the fourth dynasty of Egypt. He discovered that Pyramid G1-a, one of the subsidiary pyramids of the Great Pyramid, belonged to Hetepheres I; it was originally thought to belong to Queen Meritites I.

Abusir village in Giza Governorate, Egypt

Abusir is the name given to an Egyptian archaeological locality – specifically, an extensive necropolis of the Old Kingdom period, together with later additions – in the vicinity of the modern capital Cairo. The name is also that of a neighbouring village in the Nile Valley, whence the site takes its name. Abusir is located several kilometres north of Saqqara and, like it, served as one of the main elite cemeteries for the ancient Egyptian capital city of Memphis. Several other villages in northern and southern Egypt are named Abusir or Busiri. Abusir is one relatively small segment of the extensive "pyramid field" that extends from north of Giza to below Saqqara. The locality of Abusir took its turn as the focus of the prestigious western burial rites operating out of the then-capital of Memphis during the Old Kingdom 5th Dynasty. As an elite cemetery, neighbouring Giza had by then "filled up" with the massive pyramids and other monuments of the 4th Dynasty, leading the 5th Dynasty pharaohs to seek sites elsewhere for their own funerary monuments.

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Cemetery GIS Necropolis on the Giza Plateau, Egypt

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The Giza Solar boat museum is located in Egypt. It was constructed around 1985 and is dedicated to display the reconstructed Khufu solar ship.

Pyramid G3-c

G3-c is one of the three pyramid companions Pyramid of Menkaure. It is located on the south side of the Menkaure pyramid in the Giza Necropolis. It is the westernmost of the three pyramids of the queens.

References

    Coordinates: 29°58′42″N31°8′10″E / 29.97833°N 31.13611°E / 29.97833; 31.13611 (Pyramid G1-b)

    Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

    A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

    See also

    Pyramid G1-c building in Egypt

    G1-c is one of the subsidiary pyramids of the Giza East Field of the Giza Necropolis immediately to the eastern side of the Great Pyramid of Giza, built during the Fourth dynasty of Egypt. It is the southern of the three pyramids of the queens and is the one of Queen Henutsen. It is 46.25 metres wide and had a height of 29.60 metres. A niche, four inches deep was dug in the south wall of the burial chamber. Pyramid G 1c was originally not a part of Khufu's pyramid complex, as its southern side is aligned not with the side of the Great Pyramid, but with Khufukhaf I's mastaba tomb nearby. Pyramid G 1c was at some point thought to possibly be a satellite pyramid, because it did not come with a boat pit like pyramids G 1a and G 1b. It was later determined to be an unfinished pyramid however which was constructed in a hurry. Henutsen is thought to have been buried in the tomb. Dr. Rainer Stadelmann believes Khufukhaf is the same person as Khafra and the pyramid was built by him for his mother, but this identification is doubtful.

    Pyramid G1-d building in Egypt

    Pyramid G1-d is a satellite pyramid within the Khufu Pyramid complex. It was discovered in 1993 during work to remove a road near the pyramid G1. It is located about 25m southeast of the southeast corner of the Great Pyramid of Giza and about 7 m west of the subsidiary pyramids G1–b and G1–c.