Rare Earth (band)

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Rare Earth
Rare Earth (1973).jpg
Rare Earth in 1973
Background information
Also known asThe Sunliners (1960–68)
Origin Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
Genres
Years active1960 (1960)–present
Labels
Associated acts
Website rareearth.com
Members
  • Gil Bridges
  • Ray Monette
  • Randy "Bird" Burghdoff
  • Floyd Stokes Jr.
  • Mike Bruner
Past membersSee members section

Rare Earth is an American rock band affiliated with Motown's Rare Earth record label (named after the band), which prospered from 1970–1972. Although not the first white band signed to Motown, Rare Earth was the first big hit-making act signed by Motown that consisted only of white members. (None of the previously signed all-white acts - The Rustix, The Dalton Boys, or The Underdogs - had any hits.) [4]

Rock music is a broad genre of popular music that originated as "rock and roll" in the United States in the early 1950s, and developed into a range of different styles in the 1960s and later, particularly in the United Kingdom and in the United States. It has its roots in 1940s and 1950s rock and roll, a style which drew heavily on the genres of blues, rhythm and blues, and from country music. Rock music also drew strongly on a number of other genres such as electric blues and folk, and incorporated influences from jazz, classical and other musical styles. Musically, rock has centered on the electric guitar, usually as part of a rock group with electric bass, drums, and one or more singers. Usually, rock is song-based music usually with a 4/4 time signature using a verse–chorus form, but the genre has become extremely diverse. Like pop music, lyrics often stress romantic love but also address a wide variety of other themes that are frequently social or political.

A record label, or record company, is a brand or trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. Sometimes, a record label is also a publishing company that manages such brands and trademarks, coordinates the production, manufacture, distribution, marketing, promotion, and enforcement of copyright for sound recordings and music videos, while also conducting talent scouting and development of new artists, and maintaining contracts with recording artists and their managers. The term "record label" derives from the circular label in the center of a vinyl record which prominently displays the manufacturer's name, along with other information. Within the mainstream music industry, recording artists have traditionally been reliant upon record labels to broaden their consumer base, market their albums, and be both promoted and heard on music streaming services, radio, and television. Record labels also provide publicists, who assist performers in gaining positive media coverage, and arrange for their merchandise to be available via stores and other media outlets.

White people is a racial classification specifier, used mostly and often exclusively for people of European descent; depending on context, nationality, and point of view. The term has at times been expanded to encompass persons of Middle Eastern and North African descent, persons who are often considered non-white in other contexts. The usage of "white people" or a "white race" for a large group of mainly or exclusively European populations, defined by their light skin, among other physical characteristics, and contrasting with "black people", Amerindians, and other "colored" people or "persons of color", originated in the 17th century. It was only during the 19th century that this vague category was transformed in a quasi-scientific system of race and skin color relations. The term "Caucasian" is sometimes used as a synonym for "white" in its racial sense and sometimes to refer to a larger racial category that includes white people among other groups.

Contents

History

1960s

The group formed in 1960 as The Sunliners and changed its name to Rare Earth in 1968. [4] After recording an unsuccessful debut album, Dream/Answers, on the Verve label in 1968, the group was signed to Motown in 1969. [4] The band was one of the first acts signed to a new Motown imprint that would be dedicated to white rock acts. [5] The record company did not have a name for the new label yet and the band jokingly suggested Motown call the label "Rare Earth". To the band's surprise, Motown decided to do just that. [4]

Verve Records American record label

Verve Records, also known as The Verve Music Group, founded in 1956 by Norman Granz, is home to the world's largest jazz catalogue and includes recordings by artists such as Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone, Stan Getz, Bill Evans and Billie Holiday, among others. It absorbed the catalogues of Granz's earlier labels, Clef Records, founded in 1946, Norgran Records, founded in 1953, and material previously licensed to Mercury Records.

The main personnel in the group were Gil Bridges, saxophone, flute, vocals; Peter Hoorelbeke (aka Peter Rivera), [6] lead vocals, drums; John Parrish (aka John Persh), bass guitar, trombone, vocals; Rod Richards (born Rod Cox), guitar, vocals; and Kenny James (born Ken Folcik), keyboards. The group's recording style was hard-driving.

Saxophone type of musical instrument of the woodwind family

The saxophone is a family of woodwind instruments. Saxophones are usually made of brass and played with a single-reed mouthpiece similar to that of the clarinet. Although most saxophones are made from brass, they are categorized as woodwind instruments, because sound is produced by an oscillating reed, traditionally made out of woody cane, rather than lips vibrating in a mouthpiece cup as with the brass instrument family. As with the other woodwinds, the pitch of the note being played is controlled by covering holes in the body tube to control the resonant frequency of the air column by changing the effective length of the tube.

Flute musical instrument of the woodwind family

The flute is a family of musical instruments in the woodwind group. Unlike woodwind instruments with reeds, a flute is an aerophone or reedless wind instrument that produces its sound from the flow of air across an opening. According to the instrument classification of Hornbostel–Sachs, flutes are categorized as edge-blown aerophones. A musician who plays the flute can be referred to as a flute player, flautist, flutist or, less commonly, fluter or flutenist.

Singing act of producing musical sounds with the voice

Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques. A person who sings is called a singer or vocalist. Singers perform music that can be sung with or without accompaniment by musical instruments. Singing is often done in an ensemble of musicians, such as a choir of singers or a band of instrumentalists. Singers may perform as soloists or accompanied by anything from a single instrument up to a symphony orchestra or big band. Different singing styles include art music such as opera and Chinese opera, Indian music and religious music styles such as gospel, traditional music styles, world music, jazz, blues, gazal and popular music styles such as pop, rock, electronic dance music and filmi.

In late 1969 Edward "Eddie" Guzman (congas and assorted percussive instruments) was added to the group.

During 1969 the group contributed music to the film Generation that starred David Janssen and Kim Darby. An accompanying soundtrack album was released, but quickly withdrawn after the film failed commercially, with only a small number of copies sold. Several tracks were remixed and included on the next LP, Ecology , in 1970.

<i>Generation</i> (film) 1969 film by George Schaefer

Generation is a 1969 American comedy film directed by George Schaefer and written by William Goodhart. The film stars David Janssen, Kim Darby, Pete Duel, Carl Reiner, Andrew Prine and James Coco. The film was released on December 15, 1969, by AVCO Embassy Pictures. It is based on the 1965 play of the same name.

David Janssen American actor

David Janssen was an American film and television actor who is best known for his starring role as Richard Kimble in the television series The Fugitive (1963–1967). Janssen also had the title roles in three other series: Richard Diamond, Private Detective; Harry O; and O'Hara, U.S. Treasury.

Kim Darby American actress

Kim Darby is an American actress best known for her role as Mattie Ross in the film True Grit (1969).

1970s

Rare Earth had a number of Top 40 hits in 1970–71, including remakes of The Temptations' "(I Know) I'm Losing You" (which was used in the documentary video It's Time ) and "Get Ready". Each was more successful than The Temptations original, with "Get Ready" being their biggest hit, peaking at #4 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. This disc sold over one million copies and received a gold record awarded by the Recording Industry Association of America. [7] The group gained a bit of notoriety when it was mentioned dismissively in Gil Scott-Heron's 1970 poem, "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised", which included the line, "The theme song [to the revolution] will not be written by Jim Webb, Francis Scott Key, nor sung by Glen Campbell, Tom Jones, Johnny Cash, Engelbert Humperdinck, or the Rare Earth." [4]

The Temptations American Motown vocal group

The Temptations are an American vocal group who released a series of successful singles and albums with Motown Records during the 1960s and 1970s. The group’s work with producer Norman Whitfield, beginning with the Top 10 hit single "Cloud Nine" in October 1968, pioneered psychedelic soul, and was significant in the evolution of R&B and soul music. The band members are known for their choreography, distinct harmonies, and dress style. Having sold tens of millions of albums, the Temptations are among the most successful groups in popular music.

"(I Know) I'm Losing You" is a 1966 hit single recorded by The Temptations for the Gordy (Motown) label and produced by Norman Whitfield.

Get Ready (The Temptations song) song by The Temptations

"Get Ready" is a Motown song written by Smokey Robinson, which resulted in two hit records for the label: a U.S. No. 29 version by The Temptations in 1966, and a U.S. No. 4 version by Rare Earth in 1970. It is significant for being the last song Robinson wrote and produced for the Temptations, due to a deal Berry Gordy made with Norman Whitfield, that if "Get Ready" did not meet with the expected degree of success, then Whitfield's song, "Ain't Too Proud To Beg", would get the next release, which resulted in Whitfield more or less replacing Robinson as the group's producer.

In 1971 Richards left due to musical differences, and James, weary of the group's increased touring schedule, also departed. Ray Monette (guitar) and Mark Olson (keyboards, vocals) joined to replace them.

The group's hits from late 1970 to early 1972 were "Born To Wander" (#17), "I Just Want to Celebrate" (#7), and "Hey, Big Brother" (#19). There were no significant hits thereafter. Nevertheless, the band continued to record into the 1990s.

By 1972 Motown had decided to relocate from Detroit to Los Angeles and Rare Earth soon followed suit. Persh, however, decided not to make the move and was succeeded in the band by Mike Urso (Persh later died from a hospital staphylococcal infection on January 27, 1981).

Their 1973 album, Ma, written and produced by Norman Whitfield, is considered one of their best overall works, and features their version of "Hum Along and Dance". [4] Unfortunately, it didn't sell all that well and produced no hits.

Rare Earth was the opening act at California Jam festival in Ontario, California on April 6, 1974. The festival attracted over 250,000 people, [8] and the band appeared alongside 1970s rock groups Black Sabbath; Emerson, Lake & Palmer; Deep Purple; Earth, Wind & Fire; Seals and Crofts; Black Oak Arkansas and the Eagles. Portions of the show were broadcast on ABC Television in the U.S., exposing the band to a wider audience.

In 1974 the group began working with Motown producer Frank Wilson on their next project. But in his autobiography, "Born to Wander", Hoorelbeke described his having objections when Wilson okayed a song contributed by Olson without running it by the others first. Hoorelbeke thought the song was not up to the band's usual standards and Wilson ended up being taken off the project.

In July 1974 the group divided. Mike Urso left the group along with Hoorelbeke and they formed a new band, HUB, with Rare Earth's 1970–1972 co-producer, Tom Baird, using the initials of their surnames (Hoorelbeke, Urso and Baird). HUB went on to record two albums for Capitol Records but came to a sudden end in November 1975 after Baird was killed in a boating accident.

The others (minus Olson who left to join the backup band for Jennifer Warnes) decided to continue as Rare Earth and brought in new players: Jerry LaCroix (vocals, sax, harmonica, formerly of The Boogie Kings, Edgar Winter's White Trash and Blood, Sweat & Tears), Paul Warren (guitar, backing vocals), Bartholomew ("Frosty") Eugene Smith-Frost (formerly with Sweathog and Lee Michaels, drums), Reggie McBride (ex-Stevie Wonder, bass) and Gabriel Katona (keyboards).

The new lineup recorded Back to Earth in 1975 and went back on the road. However, both Paul Warren and Frosty left during this tour and new drummer Chet McCracken (who would go on to join the Doobie Brothers) was hired to finish out their 1975 tour. The band then recorded Midnight Lady (minus Katona and McCracken), which was released in 1976. Frank Westbrook replaced Katona on keyboards, whilst McCracken was not replaced, instead session musician Ollie Brown handled percussion duties for Midnight Lady. But neither of these releases sold as well as the band had been used to and they soon found themselves bogged down and unable to tour when they brought a lawsuit against former member Hoorelbeke, falsely claiming that he'd tried to make off with the group's name and retirement monies. The lawsuit was eventually settled in Hoorelbeke's favor and he was given a settlement.

In late 1976, a former Motown vice president, Barney Ales, an earlier champion of Rare Earth, returned to the company to head up one of their new offshoot labels, Prodigal Records. He made an offer to the group to reunite with Peter Hoorelbeke. The 1972–74 membership of the band (Hoorelbeke, Bridges, Urso, Olson, Monette and Guzman) were scheduled to record a new album on Prodigal. However, Monette and Olson did not agree to the terms and abstained. Session players Dan Ferguson (guitar) and Ron Fransen (keyboards) were brought in instead to play on Rarearth, which was produced by James Anthony Carmichael (who later had success with The Commodores and Lionel Richie). It was released in 1977 but failed to reach expectations.

Later in 1977, the group reassembled with Chicago-based producer John Ryan (who worked with Styx and others) to begin work on two new albums. This time, Monette and Olson agreed to join in and the results were Band Together and Grand Slam, both released in 1978 and featuring more of a late 1970s disco sound, with the former providing the Bee Gees-penned hit "Warm Ride", which peaked at #39. Other than the one solitary hit, neither album was a big seller and the band soon found themselves without a home. Gap Band bassist Robert Wilson contributed to some of the tracks on Band Together.

In June 1979, Urso left the band again. On his recommendation, and after hearing several bass players, the group recruited bassist Ken Johnston, who joined the group's road tours for two years until June 1981. Johnston had just completed a stint with jazz singer Maxine Weldon and had rejoined Las Vegas comedian/songster Kenny Laursen. He interrupted his tour with Laursen to join Rare Earth in Florida.

1980s and 1990s

Former Motown writer Dino Fekaris, who'd penned the band's hits "I Just Want to Celebrate" and "Hey Big Brother", was next to step back into the group's life in 1980. He'd just come off back to back successes with Gloria Gaynor and Peaches & Herb and had won a Grammy for Gaynor's huge hit I Will Survive. RCA expressed interest in the band's new project and gave them an advance to go ahead and start recording. The project was originally to be titled King of the Mountain, with the title track slated to be the theme of a 1981 movie of the same name that starred Harry Hamlin. But the movie people passed on the song, and when the record was done, RCA was not happy with Fekaris' production, so they passed as well. This album, retitled Tight & Hot, saw a very limited release in 1982 in Canada only.

By the summer of 1981, Mike Urso had returned to Rare Earth after a two-year absence, but he left again in mid-1983, and has not returned to the band since then. Tim Ellsworth was then brought in as new bassist/vocalist in September 1983. By the tail end of that year, Peter Hoorelbeke was gone from the band as well after disagreements with Gil Bridges. (Hoorelbeke went on to form The Classic Rock All-Stars in 1992.) Drummer Tony Thomas replaced Hoorelbeke on drums. After Hoorelbeke's departure, Ellsworth and Olson took over lead vocals. By that time most of the members of the band had moved back to Detroit, and the group continued to tour playing mostly clubs despite the lack of a recording contract.

Personnel shuffles abounded in the mid-80s. In September 1984 Bob Weaver took over the drum throne and played with the group into 1985. He was temporarily succeeded by Bob Brock, whose professional name was Bobby Rock (not Bob Rock, the famous Hard rock/Heavy metal producer from Canada), but returned only to be replaced by Jerry LeBloch in mid-1985. Also in September of '84, Andy Merrild replaced Tim Ellsworth as bassist until the end of June 1985. Ellsworth then returned and toured with the group until the end of August of '85. The group's road manager, Randy "Bird" Burghdoff, took over as Rare Earth's bassist in September 1985 and has remained in that position ever since. Mark Olson was let go in 1986 after increasing personal and substance abuse troubles. (Olson died on April 14, 1991, at the age of 41, from liver disease.) Rick Warner was then rolled in as the band's new keyboardist and Wayne Baraks, who was brought in in 1987 on rhythm guitar, took over much of the lead vocals as well.

In the late 80s and early 90s the musical chairs slowed down somewhat as things stabilized and the band found itself in demand to play on "oldies" bills with other acts of the 60s and 70s.

Drummer Dean Boucher replaced LeBloch on drums in 1990 and RE signed with the small label Koch International and began work on a new album. The result was Different World (released in February 1993) which was a collection containing a few covers of older songs and new material. It was mostly overlooked by the public.

On July 29, 1993, the band suffered the loss of another member when long time percussionist Eddie Guzman (age 49) died at his home in Howell, Michigan.

The group kept going, though, and brought in new drummer Floyd Stokes Jr., who also took over for the departing Boucher, and took on lead vocal duties too after guitarist Baraks pulled out of the group in 1994.

Other than Mike Bruner's succeeding Rick Warner in January 1998 and Ivan Greilich's filling in for Ray Monette for five years (2004–2009), the lineup has been stable overall during the last decade or so.

Rare Earth continues to perform at corporate events and on the oldies circuit. Bits from their recordings have been used as samples on recordings as diverse as Beck's "Derelict", UNKLE, and DJ Shadow's "GDMFSOB (feat. Roots Manuva - U.N.K.L.E. uncensored version)", Black Sheep's "Try Counting Sheep", Peanut Butter Wolf's "Tale of Five Cities", Scarface's "Faith", NWA's "Real Niggaz Don't Die" and Eric B. and Rakim's "What's Going On".

2000 and beyond

Their hit "I Just Want to Celebrate" has been used in US-wide advertising campaigns by Ford Motor Company, AT&T Corporation, and Nicoderm.

In 2005, Rare Earth was voted into the Michigan Rock and Roll Legends Hall of Fame. [9]

On October 27 and 28, 2007, heavy metal band Metallica performed "I Just Want to Celebrate" during their acoustic performances at Neil Young's Bridge School Benefit show.

Members

Current members
Former members
1960–19691969–19711971–19721972–1974
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Peter Hoorelbeke – drums, lead vocals
  • Kenny James – keyboards
  • John Persh – bass, trombone, backing vocals
  • Rod Richards – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Peter Hoorelbeke – drums, lead vocals
  • Kenny James – keyboards
  • John Persh – bass, trombone, backing vocals
  • Rod Richards – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Peter Hoorelbeke – drums, lead vocals
  • John Persh – bass, trombone, backing vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, backing vocals
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Peter Hoorelbeke – drums, lead vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, backing vocals
  • Mike Urso – bass, backing vocals
1974–19751975–197619761976–1977
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Barry "Frosty" Frost – drums
  • Gabriel Katona – keyboards
  • Jerry LaCroix – lead vocals, saxophone, harmonica
  • Reggie McBride – bass
  • Paul Warren – rhythm guitars, backing vocals
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Gabriel Katona – keyboards
  • Jerry LaCroix – lead vocals, saxophone, harmonica
  • Reggie McBride – bass
  • Chet McCracken – drums
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Jerry LaCroix – lead vocals, saxophone, harmonica
  • Reggie McBride – bass
  • Frank Westbrook – keyboards
  • Jimi Calhoun - bass
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Peter Hoorelbeke – drums, lead vocals
  • Mike Urso – bass, backing vocals
1977–19791979–19811981–19831983
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Peter Hoorelbeke – drums, lead vocals
  • Mike Urso – bass, backing vocals
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, backing vocals
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Peter Hoorelbeke – drums, lead vocals
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, backing vocals
  • Ken Johnston – bass, backing vocals
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Peter Hoorelbeke – drums, lead vocals
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, backing vocals
  • Mike Urso – bass, backing vocals
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Peter Hoorelbeke – drums, lead vocals
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, backing vocals
  • Tim Ellsworth – bass, backing vocals
1983–19841984–198519851985
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, lead vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, lead vocals
  • Tim Ellsworth – bass, lead vocals
  • Tony Thomas - drums
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, lead vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, lead vocals
  • Andy Merrild – bass
  • Bob Weaver – drums
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, lead vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, lead vocals
  • Bobby Rock – drums
  • Tim Ellsworth – bass, lead vocals
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, lead vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, lead vocals
  • Bob Weaver – drums
  • Tim Ellsworth – bass, lead vocals
19851985–19861986–19871987–1990
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, lead vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, lead vocals
  • Tim Ellsworth – bass, lead vocals
  • Jerry LeBloch – drums
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, lead vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Mark Olson – keyboards, lead vocals
  • Randy "Bird" Burghdoff – bass
  • Jerry LeBloch – drums
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, lead vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Randy "Bird" Burghdoff – bass
  • Jerry LeBloch – drums
  • Rick Warner – keyboards
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing and lead vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Randy "Bird" Burghdoff – bass
  • Jerry LeBloch – drums
  • Rick Warner – keyboards
  • Wayne Baraks – lead vocals, rhythm guitar
1990–19931993–19941994–19981998–2004
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing and lead vocals
  • Eddie Guzman – percussion
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Randy "Bird" Burghdoff – bass
  • Rick Warner – keyboards
  • Wayne Baraks – lead vocals, rhythm guitar
  • Dean Boucher – drums
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing and lead vocals
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Randy "Bird" Burghdoff – bass
  • Rick Warner – keyboards
  • Wayne Baraks – lead vocals, rhythm guitar
  • Floyd Stokes Jr. – drums, backing vocals
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing and lead vocals
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Randy "Bird" Burghdoff – bass
  • Rick Warner – keyboards
  • Floyd Stokes Jr. – drums, lead vocals
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing and lead vocals
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals
  • Randy "Bird" Burghdoff – bass, backing vocals
  • Floyd Stokes Jr. – drums, lead vocals
  • Mike Bruner – keyboards
2004–20092009–present
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing and lead vocals
  • Randy "Bird" Burghdoff – bass, backing vocals
  • Floyd Stokes Jr. – drums, lead vocals
  • Mike Bruner – keyboards
  • Ivan Greilich – lead guitars, lead vocals, keyboards, bass
  • Gil Bridges – saxophone, flute, backing and lead vocals
  • Randy "Bird" Burghdoff – bass, backing vocals
  • Floyd Stokes Jr. – drums, lead vocals
  • Mike Bruner – keyboards
  • Ray Monette – lead guitars, backing vocals

Timeline

Rare Earth (band)

Discography

Studio albums

YearAlbum US Certification
1968Dreams/Answers-
1969 Get Ready 12
1969Generation (Soundtrack)-
1970 Ecology 15
1971 One World 28
1972 Willie Remembers 90
1973 Ma 65
1975 Back to Earth 59
1976Midnight Lady-
1977Rarearth187
1978Band Together156
1978Grand Slam-
1982Tight and Hot-
1993Different World-
2008A Brand New World-

Live albums

YearAlbum US Certification
1971 Rare Earth in Concert 29
1974Live in Chicago-
1989Made in Switzerland-
2004Rock 'n' Roll Greats RARE EARTH in concert!-
2008Rare Earth Live-

Singles

YearSingleChart PositionsCertification
US AU CA
1969"Generation, Light Up The Sky"---
1970"Get Ready"4-1
"(I Know) I'm Losing You"7-15
"Born To Wander"17-12
1971"I Just Want to Celebrate"7-10
"Someone To Love"--
"Any Man Can Be a Fool"--
"Hey Big Brother"19-
1972"What'd I Say"61-
"Good Time Sally"67-
"We're Gonna Have a Good Time"93-
1973"Ma"108-
"Hum Along and Dance"110-
"Big John Is My Name"--
1974"Chained"--
1975"Keepin' Me Out of the Storm"--
"It Makes You Happy"106-
1976"Midnight Lady"--
1978"Warm Ride"3968

Compilation albums

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Rare Earth in Concert is a live album by rock band Rare Earth, which was released as a double-LP in 1971. It contains a 23:33 version of their signature hit "Get Ready", as well as a new studio song: "Nice To Be With You". It was issued a RIAA gold record award.

<i>Willie Remembers</i> 1972 studio album by Rare Earth

Willie Remembers is the fifth album of the group Rare Earth. This is the band's first attempt at producing their own original work for a whole album, instead of utilizing some cover versions and a hired producer. As a result, it did not fare as well as their past albums. "Good Time Sally" was a #67 hit.

<i>Ma</i> (Rare Earth album) 1973 studio album by Rare Earth

Ma is the sixth studio album by rock band Rare Earth, released in 1973.

<i>One World</i> (Rare Earth album) 1971 studio album by Rare Earth

One World is the fourth studio album by rock band Rare Earth and was released in June 1971. "I Just Want to Celebrate" became a Top 10 Gold certified hit, and the album would become the third Gold album from the ensemble.

<i>Get Ready</i> (Rare Earth album) 1969 studio album by Rare Earth

Get Ready is the RIAA Platinum-certified second studio album by American blues rock band Rare Earth. It was released on September 30, 1969 by Motown Records. The album spawned one hit single, an edited version of "Get Ready", which peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1970.

<i>Back to Earth</i> (Rare Earth album) 1975 studio album by Rare Earth

Back to Earth is the 8th studio album by rock band Rare Earth, which was released in 1975. Jerry La Croix replaced departed lead singer Peter Hoorelbeke and Reggie McBride replaced departed bassist Michael Urso.

<i>Portals</i> (album) 2009 studio album by Arsonists Get All the Girls

Portals is the third studio album by Arsonists Get All the Girls. It was released on July 14, 2009, through Century Media Records. In contrast to The Game of Life, Portals features a different sound and an almost completely different line-up, making guitarist Arthur Alvarez and drummer Garin Rosen the only two original members left.

The Billy Joel Band is the band that backs singer-songwriter and pianist Billy Joel on both studio and live recordings. The band stabilized around 1975 but underwent several lineup changes in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Joel's touring band as a whole did not begin playing on his records until he recorded the album Turnstiles in 1976. This line-up included Richie Cannata on saxophones and organ, Liberty DeVitto on drums, Russell Javors on guitar, and Doug Stegmeyer on bass.

References

  1. Jim McCarthy; Ron Sansoe (2004). Voices of Latin Rock: People and Events that Created this Sound. Hal Leonard Corporation. p. 12. ISBN   978-0-634-08061-6.
  2. Jim McCarthy; Ron Sansoe (2004). Voices of Latin Rock: People and Events that Created this Sound. Hal Leonard Corporation. p. 38. ISBN   978-0-634-08061-6.
  3. Howie Thompson (February 26, 2013). And The Bands Played On...: The History of Beach Music. Xlibris Corporation. p. 7. ISBN   978-1-4797-8699-2.
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  5. McIntyre, Ken. "Cult Heroes: Rare Earth - Motown's funkiest white band". LOUDER. Retrieved December 16, 2016.
  6. Voger, Mark. "Peter Rivera: Founding Rare Earth singer-drummer talks music". NJ.com. The Star-Ledger . Retrieved July 26, 2014.
  7. Murrells, Joseph (1978). The Book of Golden Discs (2nd ed.). London: Barrie and Jenkins Ltd. p. 284. ISBN   0-214-20512-6.
  8. "About Me - donbranker.com". donbranker.com. April 6, 1974. Retrieved November 2, 2011.
  9. https://www.michiganrockandrolllegends.com/mrrl-hall-of-fame/78-rare-earth
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