Sailors Don't Care (1928 film)

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Sailors Don't Care
Directed by W.P. Kellino
Produced by Maurice Elvey
Gareth Gundrey
Written byAustin Small (novel)
Eliot Stannard
Starring Estelle Brody
John Stuart
Alf Goddard
Humberston Wright
Cinematography Gaetano di Ventimiglia
Basil Emmott
Production
company
Distributed by Gaumont British Distributors
Release date
March 1928
Running time
7,500 feet [1]
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Sailors Don't Care is a 1928 British silent comedy film directed by W.P. Kellino and starring Estelle Brody, John Stuart and Alf Goddard. [2] It is based on a novel by Austin Small.

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References

  1. Low p.442
  2. BFI.org

Bibliography