Sally Forrest

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Sally Forrest
Sally Forrest in Vengeance Valley 2.jpg
Forrest in Vengeance Valley , 1951
Born
Katherine Feeney

(1928-05-28)May 28, 1928
DiedMarch 15, 2015(2015-03-15) (aged 86)
Years active1946–1967
Spouse(s)Milo O. Frank Jr (1951–2004; his death) [1] [2]

Sally Forrest (born Katherine Feeney; May 28, 1928 – March 15, 2015), was an American film, stage and TV actress of the 1940s and 1950s. She studied dance from a young age and shortly out of high school was signed to a contract by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. [3]

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer American media company

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. is an American media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of feature films and television programs. One of the world's oldest film studios, MGM's headquarters are located at 245 North Beverly Drive in Beverly Hills, California.

Contents

Early life

She was born in San Diego [4] to Michael and Marguerite (née Ellicott) Feeney. Her father was a U.S. Navy career officer, who moved his family to various naval bases, finally settling in San Diego. He and his wife later became ballroom dancers and taught dance classes, where their daughter began learning her lifelong craft. [5]

San Diego City in California, United States

San Diego is a city in the U.S. state of California. It is in San Diego County, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in Southern California, approximately 120 miles (190 km) south of Los Angeles and immediately adjacent to the border with Mexico.

Career

Forrest began her film career in the 1940s as a chorus dancer in MGM musicals. [3] She made her acting debut in Not Wanted (1949), written and produced by Ida Lupino. The film's controversial subject of unwed motherhood was a raw and unsentimental view of a condition that was rarely explored by Hollywood at that time. Forrest starred in two more Lupino projects, Never Fear (1949) and Hard, Fast and Beautiful (1951), as well as other film noir films, including Mystery Street (1950), directed by John Sturges, and the star-studded While the City Sleeps (1956), directed by Fritz Lang. [3] Her musical background and training as a jazz and ballet dancer brought roles in the transitional musicals that rounded off the golden age of MGM; most notable was Excuse My Dust (1951). [6]

Ida Lupino American film director and actress

Ida Lupino was an English-American actress, singer, director, and producer. She is widely regarded as one of the most prominent, and one of the only, female filmmakers working during the 1950s in the Hollywood studio system. With her independent production company, she co-wrote and co-produced several social-message films and became the first woman to direct a film noir with The Hitch-Hiker in 1953.

<i>Never Fear</i> 1950 film by Ida Lupino

Never Fear 1949 is an American drama film directed and co-written by Ida Lupino, and produced by Lupino and Collier Young.

<i>Hard, Fast and Beautiful</i> 1951 film by Ida Lupino

Hard, Fast and Beautiful is a 1951 American drama film directed by Ida Lupino and starring Claire Trevor, loosely based on the 1930 novel American Girl by sports fiction author John R. Tunis, which itself was an unflattering and thinly veiled fictionalization of tennis star Helen Wills Moody.

Most of her films were made under contract to MGM, which prided itself as family entertainment, but RKO, headed by the eccentric and controlling Howard Hughes, presented a very different creative challenge. Son of Sinbad (1955), now a cult classic, was one of his many pet projects where he had a personal interest in re-designing the star's skimpy wardrobe. With each rehearsal, Forrest noticed her harem dance costume slowly disappearing, until it was barely compliant with the Motion Picture Production Code.[ citation needed ]

Howard Hughes American aviator, engineer, industrialist, and film producer

Howard Robard Hughes Jr. was an American business magnate, investor, record-setting pilot, engineer, film director, and philanthropist, known during his lifetime as one of the most financially successful individuals in the world. He first became prominent as a film producer, and then as an influential figure in the aviation industry. Later in life, he became known for his eccentric behavior and reclusive lifestyle—oddities that were caused in part by a worsening obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), chronic pain from a near-fatal plane crash, and increasing deafness.

<i>Son of Sinbad</i> 1955 film by Ted Tetzlaff

Son of Sinbad is a 1955 American film directed by Ted Tetzlaff. It takes place in the Middle East and consists of a wide variety of characters including over 127 women.

Motion Picture Production Code defunct American film studio self-censorship rules

The Motion Picture Production Code was the set of industry moral guidelines that was applied to most United States motion pictures released by major studios from 1930 to 1968. It is also popularly known as the Hays Code, after Will H. Hays, who was the president of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA) from 1922 to 1945. Under Hays' leadership, the MPPDA, later known as the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), adopted the Production Code in 1930, and began rigidly enforcing it in mid-1934. The Production Code spelled out what was acceptable and what was unacceptable content for motion pictures produced for a public audience in the United States.

In 1953, after moving to New York with her husband, writer and producer Milo Frank (who was hired to be head of casting for CBS), her film work transitioned to theatre and TV. She starred on Broadway in The Seven Year Itch , and appeared in major stage productions of Damn Yankees , Bus Stop , As You Like It and No No Nanette . [7] Later she returned to Hollywood and continued working at RKO and Columbia Pictures. Her final film was RKO's While the City Sleeps in 1956, a murder mystery co-starring Dana Andrews, Rhonda Fleming, Vincent Price and her frequent collaborator Ida Lupino.

<i>The Seven Year Itch</i> (play) play written by George Axelrod

The Seven Year Itch is a 1952 three-act play written by George Axelrod starring Tom Ewell and Vanessa Brown.

<i>Damn Yankees</i> Musical play

Damn Yankees is a musical comedy with a book by George Abbott and Douglass Wallop, music and lyrics by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross. The story is a modern retelling of the Faust legend set during the 1950s in Washington, D.C., during a time when the New York Yankees dominated Major League Baseball. It is based on Wallop's novel The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant.

<i>As You Like It</i> pastoral comedy by William Shakespeare

As You Like It is a pastoral comedy by William Shakespeare believed to have been written in 1599 and first published in the First Folio in 1623. The play's first performance is uncertain, though a performance at Wilton House in 1603 has been suggested as a possibility.

Personal life

Forrest married Frank in 1951. They had no children and remained wed until his death in 2004. [8]

Other

Forrest and Frank were owners of the former Benedict Canyon home of Jean Harlow and Paul Bern on Easton Drive in Beverly Hills. They rented it to Jay Sebring prior to his murder at the nearby home of Sharon Tate. [9]

Death

Forrest, a widow since 2004, died of cancer on March 15, 2015, aged 86, at her home in Beverly Hills, California. [7] She was survived by a niece and two nephews. [6]

Filmography

Television

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References

  1. Obituary 2004 June 23, 2004), variety.com; retrieved 2018-02-19
  2. Bio, imdb.com; retrieved 2018-02-19
  3. 1 2 3 Sally Forrest, Actress in 1940s and '50s Film Musicals" [obituary] (March 27, 2015), nytimes.com; retrieved 2015-03-29.
  4. Colker, David (March 28, 2015). "Sally Forrest, dancer lifted to dramatic roles by Ida Lupino, dies at 86", latimes.com; retrieved 2015-03-29.
  5. Sally Forrest biography, artsmeme.com, December 8, 2013; accessed August 14, 2015.
  6. 1 2 Sally Forrest on IMDb
  7. 1 2 Barnes, Mike (March 25, 2015). "Sally Forrest, Actress and Protege of Ida Lupino, Dies at 86". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  8. "Sally Forrest, actress - obituary". The Telegraph. April 6, 2015. Archived from the original on 8 September 2018. Retrieved 8 September 2018.
  9. Fleming, E.J. (2009). Paul Bern: The Life and Famous Death of the MGM Director and Husband of Jean Harlow. McFarland; 1st Edition (January 9, 2009). p. 299. ISBN   978-0786439638.