Siege of Caen (1417)

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Siege of Caen
Part of the Hundred Years' War
Date14 August - 20 September 1417
Location 49°11′N0°22′W / 49.18°N 0.37°W / 49.18; -0.37 Coordinates: 49°11′N0°22′W / 49.18°N 0.37°W / 49.18; -0.37
Result English victory. Caen surrenders
Belligerents
Royal Arms of England (1399-1603).svg Kingdom of England France moderne.svg Kingdom of France
Commanders and leaders
Royal Arms of England (1399-1603).svg Henry V
Arms of Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence.svg Thomas, Duke of Clarence
Blason ville fr Ecos (Eure).svg Guillaume de Montenay

The siege of Caen took place during the Hundred Years War when English forces under Henry V laid siege to and captured Caen in Normandy from its French defenders.

Following his victory at Agincourt in 1415, Henry had returned to England and led a second invasion force across the English Channel. Caen was a large city in the Duchy of Normandy, a historic English territory. Following a large-scale bombardment Henry's initial assault was repulsed, but his brother Thomas, Duke of Clarence was able to force a breach and overrun the city. The castle held out until 20 September before surrendering. [1]

In the course of the siege, an English knight, Sir Edward Sprenghose, managed to scale the walls, only to be burned alive by the city's defenders. Thomas Walsingham wrote that this was one of the factors in the violence with which the captured town was sacked by the English. [2] During the sack on orders of Henry V all 1800 men in the captured city were killed but priests and women were not to be harmed. [3]

Caen remained in English hands until 1450 when it was taken back during the French reconquest of Normandy in the closing stages of the war. [4]

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References

  1. Jaques p.182
  2. Craig Taylor (10 October 2013). Chivalry and the Ideals of Knighthood in France During the Hundred Years War. Cambridge University Press. p. 197. ISBN   978-1-107-04221-6.
  3. Mortimer, Ian (2009). 1415: Henry V's Year of Glory. The Bodley Head. p. 371.
  4. Jaques p.182

Bibliography