Stanford Cardinal women's basketball

Last updated
Stanford Cardinal women's basketball
Basketball current event.svg 2020–21 Stanford Cardinal women's basketball team
Stanford Cardinal logo.svg
University Stanford University
First season1974–75
Athletic director Bernard Muir
Head coach Tara VanDerveer (35th season)
Conference Pac-12 Conference
Location Stanford, California
Arena Maples Pavilion
(Capacity: 7,233)
Nickname Cardinal
Student sectionThe Red Zone
ColorsCardinal and White [1]
         
Uniforms
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Home
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Away
NCAA Tournament Champions
1990, 1992, 2021
NCAA Tournament Runner-up
2008, 2010
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1990, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2017, 2021
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2019, 2021
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
NCAA Tournament Round of 32
1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1982, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
Conference Tournament Champions
2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2017, 2019, 2021
Conference Regular Season Champions
1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2021

The Stanford Cardinal women's basketball team represents Stanford University, located in Stanford, California. The school's team currently competes in the Pac-12 Conference and are coached by Tara VanDerveer, in her 35th season with the Cardinal. The Cardinal won national championships in 1990, 1992 and 2021, and were runners-up in 2008 and 2010.

Contents

Season–by–season results

Statistics overview
SeasonCoachOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
Gay Coburn (NCIAC)(1974–1976)
1974–75Gay Coburn8–3
1975–76Gay Coburn10–7
Coburn:18–10
Dotty McCrea (NCIAC/NCAC/WCAA)(1976–1985)
1976–77Dotty McCrea8–11
1977–78Dotty McCrea17–12 AIAW Regional
1978–79Dotty McCrea20–67–54 AIAW Regional
1979–80Dotty McCrea17–147–5T–3rd AIAW Regional
1980–81Dotty McCrea15–165–75
1981–82Dotty McCrea19–89–32 NCAA First Round
1982–83Dotty McCrea19–165–95
1983–84Dotty McCrea5–231–13T–7th
1984–85Dotty McCrea9–192–127th
MacCrea:129–125
Tara VanDerveer (Pac–West/Pac–10)(1985–1995)
1985–86 Tara VanDerveer 13–151–75th
1986–87Tara VanDerveer14–148–10T–6th
1987–88Tara VanDerveer27–514–43rd NCAA Sweet 16
1988–89Tara VanDerveer28–318–01st NCAA Elite 8
1989–90Tara VanDerveer32–117–1T–1st NCAA Champions
1990–91Tara VanDerveer26–616–21st NCAA Final Four
1991–92Tara VanDerveer30–315–31st NCAA Champions
1992–93Tara VanDerveer26–615–31st NCAA Sweet 16
1993–94Tara VanDerveer25–615–32nd NCAA Elite 8
1994–95Tara VanDerveer30–317–11st NCAA Final Four
VanDerveer (1st stint):251–62
Amy Tucker/Marianne Stanley (Pac–10)(1995–1996)
1995–96Amy Tucker/Marianne Stanley29–318–01st NCAA Final Four
Tucker/Stanley:29–3
Tara VanDerveer (Pac–10/Pac–12)(1996–present)
1996–97Tara VanDerveer34–218–01st NCAA Final Four
1997–98Tara VanDerveer21–617–11st NCAA 1st round
1998–99Tara VanDerveer18–1214–43rd NCAA 1st round
1999–2000Tara VanDerveer21–913–5T–2nd NCAA 2nd round
2000–01Tara VanDerveer19–1112–6T–1st NCAA 2nd round
2001–02Tara VanDerveer32–318–01st NCAA Sweet 16
2002–03Tara VanDerveer27–515–31st NCAA 2nd round
2003–04Tara VanDerveer27–714–4T–1st NCAA Elite 8
2004–05Tara VanDerveer32–317–11st NCAA Elite 8
2005–06Tara VanDerveer26–815–31st NCAA Elite 8
2006–07 Tara VanDerveer29–517–11st NCAA 2nd round
2007–08Tara VanDerveer35–416–21st NCAA Runner–up
2008–09 Tara VanDerveer33–517–11st NCAA Final Four
2009–10 Tara VanDerveer36–218–01st NCAA Runner–up
2010–11 Tara VanDerveer33–318–01st NCAA Final Four
2011–12 Tara VanDerveer35–218–01st NCAA Final Four
2012–13 Tara VanDerveer33–317–11st NCAA Sweet 16
2013–14 Tara VanDerveer33–417–11st NCAA Final Four
2014–15 Tara VanDerveer26–1013–53rd NCAA Sweet 16
2015–16 Tara VanDerveer27–814–4T–3rd NCAA Elite 8
2016–17 Tara VanDerveer32–615–32nd NCAA Final Four
2017–18 Tara VanDerveer24–1114–32nd NCAA Sweet 16
2018–19 Tara VanDerveer31–515–32nd NCAA Elite 8
2019-20 Tara VanDerveer27–614–4T-2ndPostseason canceled due to Coronavirus pandemic
2020-21 Tara VanDerveer31–219–21st NCAA Champions
VanDerveer (2nd stint):722–142
VanDerveer (Total):973–204
Total:1,149–342

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

NCAA Tournament results

YearSeedRoundOpponentResult
1982 #7First Round#2 MarylandL 48−82
1988 #5Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#4 Montana
#1 Texas
W 74−72 (OT)
L 58−79
1989 #2Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#7 Illinois State
#3 Iowa
#1 Louisiana Tech
W 105−77
W 98−74
L 75–85
1990 #1Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Championship
#9 Hawaii
#5 Ole Miss
#7 Arkansas
#2 Virginia
#2 Auburn
W 106−76
W 78−65
W 114–87
W 75–66
W 88–81
1991 #2Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#7 Cal State Fullerton
#3 Washington
#1 Georgia
#1 Tennessee
W 91−67
W 73−47
W 75–67
L 60–68
1992 #1Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Championship
#9 UC Santa Barbara
#4 Texas Tech
#3 USC
#1 Virginia
#4 Western Kentucky
W 82−73
W 75−63
W 82–62
W 66–65
W 78–62
1993 #1Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#8 Georgia
#4 Colorado
W 93−60
L 67−80
1994 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Wisconsin–Green Bay
#7 Montana
#3 Colorado
#1 Purdue
W 81−56
W 66−62
W 78–62
L 65–82
1995 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#15 UC Irvine
#10 SMU
#3 North Carolina
#4 Purdue
#1 Connecticut
W 88−55
W 95−73
W 81–71
W69–58
L 60–87
1996 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#16 Grambling State
#8 Colorado State
#4 Alabama
#6 Auburn
#2 Georgia
W 82−43
W 94−63
W 78–76
W71–57
L 76–86
1997 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#16 Howard
#8 Texas Tech
#4 Virginia
#2 Georgia
#1 Old Dominion
W 111−59
W 67−45
W 91–69
W 82–47
L 82–83
1998 #1First Round#16 HarvardL 67−71
1999 #7First Round#10 MaineL 58−60
2000 #9First Round
Second Round
#8 Michigan
#1 Georgia
W 71−64 (OT)
L 64–83
2001 #10First Round
Second Round
#7 George Washington
#2 Oklahoma
W 76−51
L 50–67
2002 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#15 Weber State
#10 Tulane
#3 Colorado
W 76−51
W 77–55
L 59–62
2003 #3First Round
Second Round
#14 Western Michigan
#6 Minnesota
W 82−66
L 56–68
2004 #6First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#11 Missouri
#3 Oklahoma
#2 Vanderbilt
#1 Tennessee
W 68−44
W 68−43
W 57–55
L 60–62
2005 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Santa Clara
#10 Utah
#3 Connecticut
#1 Michigan State
W 94−57
W 88−62
W 76–59
L 69–76
2006 #3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#14 SE Missouri
#6 Florida State
#2 Oklahoma
#1 LSU
W 72−45
W 88−70
W 88–74
L 59–62
2007 #2First Round
Second Round
#15 Idaho State
#10 Florida State
W 96−58
L 61–68
2008 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Championship
#15 Cleveland State
#7 UTEP
#6 Pittsburgh
#1 Maryland
#1 Connecticut
#1 Tennessee
W 85−47
W 88−54
W 72–53
W 98–87
W 82–73
L 48–64
2009 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#15 UC Santa Barbara
#10 San Diego State
#3 Ohio State
#4 Iowa State
#1 Connecticut
W 74−39
W 77−49
W 84–66
W74–53
L 64–83
2010 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Championship
#16 UC Riverside
#8 Iowa
#5 Georgia
#3 Xavier
#3 Oklahoma
#1 Connecticut
W 79−47
W 96−67
W 73–36
W 55–53
W 73–66
L 47–53
2011 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#16 UC Davis
#9 St. John's
#5 North Carolina
#11 Gonzaga
#2 Texas A&M
W 86−59
W 75−49
W 72–65
W 83–60
L 62–63
2012 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#16 Hampton
#8 West Virginia
#5 South Carolina
#2 Duke
#1 Baylor
W 73−51
W 72−55
W 76–60
W 81–69
L 47–59
2013 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#16 Tulsa
#8 Michigan
#4 Georgia
W 72−56
W 73−40
L 59–61
2014 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#15 South Dakota
#10 Florida State
#3 Penn State
#4 North Carolina
#1 Connecticut
W 81−62
W 63−44
W 82–57
W 74–65
L 56–75
2015 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Cal State Northridge
#5 Oklahoma
#1 Notre Dame
W 73−60
W 86−76
L 60–81
2016 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#13 San Francisco
#12 South Dakota State
#1 Notre Dame
#7 Washington
W 85−58
W 66−65
W 90–84
L 76–85
2017 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#15 New Mexico State
#7 Kansas State
#3 Texas
#1 Notre Dame
#1 South Carolina
W 72−64
W 69−48
W 77–66
W 76–75
L 53–62
2018 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Gonzaga
#12 Florida Gulf Coast
#1 Louisville
W 82−68
W 90−70
L 59–86
2019 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 UC Davis
#7 BYU
#11 Missouri State
#1 Notre Dame
W 79−54
W 72−63
W 55–46
L 68–84
2021 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
National Championship
#16 Utah Valley
#8 Oklahoma State
#5 Missouri State
#2 Louisville
#1 South Carolina
#3 Arizona
W 87−44
W 73−62
W 89−62
W 78−63
W 66−65
W 54–53

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The Stanford Cardinal are the athletic teams that represent Stanford University. As of April 5, 2021, Stanford's program has won 127 NCAA team championships, as well as 25 consecutive NACDA Directors' Cups, awarded annually to the most successful overall college sports program in the nation. Stanford has won at least one NCAA team championship each academic year for 45 consecutive years, starting in 1976-77 and continuing through 2020–21. 165 Stanford-affiliated athletes have won a total of 270 Olympic medals, including 27 medals at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro games. Stanford's teams compete at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level as a member of the Pac-12 Conference, along with other schools from the western third of the United States.

Stanford Cardinal football American college football organization

The Stanford Cardinal football program represents Stanford University in college football at the NCAA Division I FBS level and is a member of the Pac-12 Conference's North Division. The team is known as the Cardinal, adopted prior to the 1982 season. Stanford was known as the "Cardinal" for its first two decades of athletic competition, then more commonly as the "Cardinals" until 1930. The name was changed to the "Indians" from 1930 to January 1972, and back to the "Cardinals" from 1972 through 1981. A student vote in December 1975 to change the nickname to "Robber Barons" was not approved by administrators.

The Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team represents Stanford University in Stanford, California, United States. The school's team currently competes in the Pac-12 Conference. They are coached by Jerod Haase and play their home games at Maples Pavilion.

Stanford Cardinal baseball

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2008 Stanford Cardinal football team American college football season

The 2008 Stanford Cardinal football team represented Stanford University in the 2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team's head coach was Jim Harbaugh, who entered his second year at Stanford. The team played their home games at Stanford Stadium in Stanford, California and competed in the Pacific-10 Conference. The Cardinal improved on their 4–8 record from the 2007 season by going 5–7. After winning back the Stanford Axe from rival California in 2007 for the first time in five years, Stanford lost the Axe to Cal in the 2008 Big Game.

2009 Stanford Cardinal football team American college football season

The 2009 Stanford Cardinal football team represented Stanford University during the 2009 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Cardinal was led by third-year head coach Jim Harbaugh and played their home games at Stanford Stadium in Stanford, California.

2010 Stanford Cardinal football team American college football season

The 2010 Stanford Cardinal football team represented Stanford University in the 2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Cardinal were led by head coach Jim Harbaugh, who was in his 4th and final season before leaving to become head coach of the San Francisco 49ers. Harbaugh ended his four-year tenure at Stanford having taken a team that finished 1–11 in the year prior to his arrival, to a team that ended the regular season 11–1. They played their home games at Stanford Stadium and were members of the Pacific-10 Conference.

The 2006 Stanford Cardinal football team represented Stanford University in the 2006 NCAA Division I FBS football season. In head coach Walt Harris's second season at Stanford, the Cardinal won only one game, ending the season with a 1–11 record, the school's worst since a winless 1960 season. Harris was fired on December 4, 2006, two days after Stanford's regular season ended. By the end of his tenure at Stanford, Harris had surpassed Jack Curtice with the lowest winning percentage in the history of Stanford football, with a 26.1% win record.

The 2011 Stanford Cardinal football team represented Stanford University in the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS college football season. The Cardinal were led by former offensive coordinator and new head coach David Shaw, as Jim Harbaugh departed following the 2010 season in order to become the head coach of the San Francisco 49ers. They played their home games at Stanford Stadium and are members of the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference. They finished the season with 11–2 in overall record, 8–1 in Pac-12 play to finish in a tie with Oregon for first place in the North Division. Due to their head-to-head loss to Oregon, they did not represent the division in the inaugural Pac-12 Football Championship Game. They were invited the Fiesta Bowl, their second consecutive BCS game, where they were defeated by Oklahoma State 38–41 in overtime.

Notre Dame–Stanford football rivalry

The Notre Dame–Stanford football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team of the University of Notre Dame and Stanford Cardinal football team of Stanford University. As of 2019, the Notre Dame Fighting Irish and Stanford Cardinal have met 34 times, beginning in 1925. The Notre Dame–Stanford game has been played annually since 1997, with the teams meeting at Notre Dame Stadium earlier in the season in even-numbered years, and at Stanford Stadium on the weekend following Thanksgiving in odd-numbered years since 1999. The game typically alternates positions in Notre Dame's schedule with its other Pac-12 opponent, USC.

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The 2012 Stanford Cardinal football team represented Stanford University in the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Cardinal were led by second-year head coach David Shaw. They played their home games at Stanford Stadium and were members of the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference.

The Stanford Cardinal softball team represents Stanford University in NCAA Division I college softball. The team participates in the Pac-12 Conference. The Cardinal are currently led by head coach Jessica Allister. The team plays its home games at Boyd & Jill Smith Family Stadium located on the university's campus.

The Stanford Cardinal men's soccer team represents Stanford University in all NCAA Division I men's college soccer competitions. The Cardinal play in the Pac-12 Conference. Their first season as a varsity program was in 1973.

The 1930 Stanford football team represented Stanford University in the 1930 college football season. Their head coach was Pop Warner in his seventh season. Stanford played its home games at Stanford Stadium in Stanford, California.

The 2015 Stanford Cardinal football team represented Stanford University in the 2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Cardinal were led by fifth-year head coach David Shaw. They played their home games at Stanford Stadium and were members of the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference.

The 2016 Stanford Cardinal men's soccer team represented Stanford University during the 2016 NCAA Division I men's soccer season. It was the 43rd season of the university fielding a program.

The 2018 Stanford Cardinal football team represented Stanford University in the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Cardinal were led by eighth-year head coach David Shaw. They played their home games at Stanford Stadium and were members of the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference.

References

  1. "Stanford Identity Toolkit: Color" . Retrieved May 7, 2017.