The House of Shame (1938 film)

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The House of Shame
Lacasadel peccato.png
Directed by Max Neufeld
Produced by Giuseppe Amato
Written by Aldo De Benedetti
Starring Amedeo Nazzari
Assia Noris
Alida Valli
Music by Cesare A. Bixio
Cinematography Ernst Mühlrad
Edited by Maria Rosada
Production
company
Amato Film
Distributed byGeneralcine
Release date
14 December 1938
Running time
95 minutes
CountryItaly
Language Italian

The House of Shame (Italian: La casa del peccato) is a 1938 Italian comedy film directed by Max Neufeld and starring Amedeo Nazzari, Assia Noris and Alida Valli. [1]

Contents

It was shot at the Cinecittà Studios in Rome. The film's sets were designed by the art director Gastone Medin. The film was the first time Nazzari and Valli co-starred together, as they would later go on to do a number of films.

Synopsis

A wife, concerned that her husband does not love her, pretends to have another suitor in order to make him jealous. Getting wise to this, he in turn pretends to have a new girlfriend.

Cast

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References

  1. Nowell-Smith p.119

Bibliography