The Limping Man (1936 film)

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The Limping Man
Directed by Walter Summers
Written by
Produced byWalter Summers
Starring
Cinematography
Edited by Bryan Langley
Music by Harry Acres
Production
company
Distributed by Pathé Pictures International
Release date
30 October 1936
Running time
72 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Limping Man is a 1936 British crime film directed by Walter Summers and starring Francis L. Sullivan, Hugh Wakefield and Patricia Hilliard. It was an adaptation of the play of the same title by William Matthew Scott. The film was shot at Welwyn Studios. [1]

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References

  1. Wood p.91