The Lottery Bride

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The Lottery Bride
The lottery bride 1930 poster.jpg
Cover of the Kino DVD edition
Directed by Paul L. Stein
Produced by Joseph M. Schenck
Arthur Hammerstein
Written byHoward Emmett Rogers
Horace Jackson
Herbert Stothart (story)
Starring Jeanette MacDonald
John Garrick
Zasu Pitts
Joe E. Brown
Music by Rudolf Friml
Hugo Riesenfeld
Edited by Ray June
Karl Freund (uncredited)
Production
company
Joseph M. Schenck Productions
Art Cinema Corporation
Distributed by United Artists
Release date
  • November 28, 1930 (1930-11-28)
Running time
80 min. (1930 release)
67 min. (1937 release)
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The Lottery Bride is a 1930 American Pre-Code movie musical starring Jeanette MacDonald, John Garrick, ZaSu Pitts, and Joe E. Brown. The film was produced by Joseph M. Schenck and Arthur Hammerstein, based on the musical by Rudolf Friml, and released by United Artists. William Cameron Menzies is credited with the production design and special effects.

Contents

The film's final reel was in Technicolor in the original 80-minute release in 1930. However, most existing prints are black-and-white prints of the shorter (67-minute) 1937 re-release.

Preservation status

On December 14, 2011, Turner Classic Movies presented a print of this film from George Eastman House, which restored the tinted sequences and the final reel in Technicolor.

See also

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