Waltz Time (1945 film)

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Waltz Time
Directed by Paul L. Stein
Produced by Louis H. Jackson
Written by Henry C. James
Karl Rossier
Montgomery Tully
Jack Whittingham
Starring Carol Raye
Peter Graves
Patricia Medina
Music by Hans May
Cinematography Ernest Palmer
Edited by Douglas Myers
Production
company
Distributed byAnglo-American Film Corporation
Release date
13 August 1945
Running time
98 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Waltz Time is a 1945 British musical film directed by Paul L. Stein and starring Carol Raye, Peter Graves and Patricia Medina. [1]

Contents

Premise

In Imperial Vienna a young Grand Duchess is prevented from marrying the man she loves.

Partial cast

Reception

According to Kinematograph Weekly the film performed well at the British box office in 1945. [2] The 'biggest winner' at the box office in 1945 Britain was The Seventh Veil, with "runners up" being (in release order), Madonna of the Seven Moons, Old Acquaintance, Frenchman's Creek, Mrs Parkington, Arsenic and Old Lace, Meet Me in St Louis, A Song to Remember, Since You Went Away, Here Come the Waves, Tonight and Every Night, Hollywood Canteen, They Were Sisters, The Princess and the Pirate, The Adventures of Susan, National Velvet, Mrs Skefflington, I Live in Grosvenor Square, Nob Hill, Perfect Strangers, Valley of Decision, Conflict and Duffy's Tavern. British "runners up" were They Were Sisters, I Live in Grosvenor Square, Perfect Strangers, Madonna of the Seven Moons, Waterloo Road, Blithe Spirit, The Way to the Stars, I'll Be Your Sweetheart, Dead of Night, Waltz Time and Henry V. [3]

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References

  1. "BFI | Film & TV Database | WALTZ TIME (1945)". Ftvdb.bfi.org.uk. 16 April 2009. Archived from the original on 13 January 2009. Retrieved 13 March 2012.
  2. Robert Murphy, Realism and Tinsel: Cinema and Society in Britain 1939-48 2003 p 208
  3. Lant, Antonia (1991). Blackout : reinventing women for wartime British cinema. Princeton University Press. p. 232.