This Thing Called Love (1929 film)

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This Thing Called Love
This Thing Called Love 1929.jpg
Lobby card from the film
Directed by Paul L. Stein
E. J. Babille (assistant)
Produced byRalph Block
Written byHorace Jackson (adaptation)
Screenplay byHorace Jackson
Based onThis Thing Called Love, a Comedy in Three Acts
by Edwin J. Burke
Starring Edmund Lowe
Constance Bennett
Ruth Taylor
Roscoe Karns
ZaSu Pitts
Jean Harlow
Cinematography Norbert Brodin
Edited by Doane Harrison
Distributed by Pathé Exchange
Release date
  • December 13, 1929 (1929-12-13)(United States)
Running time
72 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

This Thing Called Love is a 1929 American romantic comedy film directed by Paul L. Stein and starring Edmund Lowe, Constance Bennett, Ruth Taylor, Roscoe Karns, ZaSu Pitts, and Jean Harlow. Harlow appears in a cameo role, as she was not yet famous. The film is based on the play This Thing Called Love, a Comedy in Three Acts, by Edwin J. Burke. [1]

Contents

The film was recorded in RCA Photophone and featured a two-tone Technicolor sequence. No complete copy survives, only the Technicolor sequence.[ citation needed ]

Plot

A man returns from a trip to Peru rich and looking for a wife. While still single, he has a real estate agent show him a house or two. The agent invites him to dinner, during which the agent and his wife start bickering, causing the poor fellow to rethink marriage over. He does still want to share his home with someone, however, so he has the agent's sister-in-law move in. Eventually, they fell in love.

Cast

See also

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References

  1. White Munden, Kenneth (1997). The American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures Produced in the United States: Feature Films, 1921-1930. University of California Press. p. 801. ISBN   0-520-20969-9.