Thomas Sugrue

Last updated
Thomas J. Sugrue
NationalityAmerican
Alma mater Columbia University
Cambridge University
Harvard University (Ph.D.)
Awards Bancroft Prize (1998)
Scientific career
Institutions University of Pennsylvania (1991-2015)
New York University (2015-)

Thomas J. Sugrue (born 1962, Detroit, Michigan) is an American historian of the 20th-century United States at New York University. From 1991 to 2015, he was the David Boies Professor of History and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania [1] and founding director of the Penn Social Science and Policy Forum. [2] His areas of expertise include American urban history, American political history, housing and the history of race relations. He has published extensively on the history of liberalism and conservatism, on housing and real estate, on poverty and public policy, on civil rights, and on the history of affirmative action. His most recent collaboration with Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore, These United States: A Nation in the Making 1890 to the Present, was published in 2015.

Detroit Largest city in Michigan

Detroit is the largest and most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, the largest American city on the United States–Canada border, and the seat of Wayne County. The municipality of Detroit had a 2018 estimated population of 672,662, making it the 23rd-most populous city in the United States. The metropolitan area, known as Metro Detroit, is home to 4.3 million people, making it the second-largest in the Midwest after the Chicago metropolitan area. Regarded as a major cultural center, Detroit is known for its contributions to music and as a repository for art, architecture and design.

Michigan State in the United States

Michigan is a state in the Great Lakes and Midwestern regions of the United States. Its name originates from the Ojibwe word mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake". With a population of about 10 million, Michigan is the tenth most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area, and is the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi River. Its capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Metro Detroit is among the nation's most populous and largest metropolitan economies.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or simply America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, it is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe. Most of the country is located in central North America between Canada and Mexico. With an estimated population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City.

Contents

Early life

Sugrue was born in 1962 in Detroit, Michigan and lived there until the age of ten, when his family moved to the suburbs. He graduated from Brother Rice High School (Michigan) in 1980 and from Columbia University (Summa Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa) in 1984, with a degree in History. From 1984-1986, Sugrue attended King's College, Cambridge University on a Kellett Fellowship and earned a B.A. (honours) in British History and the Doncaster History Prize of King's College. He earned his Ph.D. in history from Harvard University in 1992 working with Stephan Thernstrom and Barbara Guttmann Rosenkrantz. [3] He began his teaching career at the University of Pennsylvania in 1991. Sugrue has won fellowships and grants from the Brookings Institution, the Social Science Research Council, the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He was an inaugural Alphonse Fletcher Foundation Fellow and was in the first class of Andrew Carnegie Fellows in 2015. [4] He has also been a visiting faculty member at New York University, Harvard University, and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris.

Brother Rice High School (Michigan) Private, all-boys school in Bloomfield Township, Michigan, United States

Brother Rice High School is a Roman Catholic all-boys non-residential college prep school with approximately 590 students located in Bloomfield Township, Michigan, United States in Metro Detroit. The school shares a campus with the all-girls Marian High School, Saint Regis Parish and the K-8 Saint Regis School.

Columbia University Private Ivy League research university in New York City

Columbia University is a private Ivy League research university in New York City. Established in 1754 on the grounds of Trinity Church in Manhattan, Columbia is the oldest institution of higher education in New York and the fifth-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. It is one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence, seven of which belong to the Ivy League. It has been ranked by numerous major education publications as among the top ten universities in the world.

Phi Beta Kappa Honor society for the liberal arts and sciences in the United States

The Phi Beta Kappa Society (ΦΒΚ) is the oldest academic honor society in the United States, and is often described as its most prestigious honor society, due to its long history and academic selectivity. Phi Beta Kappa aims to promote and advocate excellence in the liberal arts and sciences, and to induct the most outstanding students of arts and sciences at American colleges and universities. It was founded at the College of William and Mary on December 5, 1776 as the first collegiate Greek-letter fraternity and was among the earliest collegiate fraternal societies.

Academic

Sugrue's first book, The Origins of the Urban Crisis (Princeton University Press, 1996) was widely acclaimed. It won the prestigious Bancroft Prize in History, the President's Book Award of the Social Science History Association, the Philip Taft Prize in Labor History, the Urban History Association Prize for Best Book in North American Labor History, and was selected as a Choice Outstanding Book. In 2005, Princeton University Press selected Origins of the Urban Crisis as one of its 100 most influential books of the preceding century and issued it as a Princeton Classic. Sugrue has also edited two other books, W.E.B. DuBois, Race, and the City (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998), with Michael B. Katz, and The New Suburban History (University of Chicago Press, 2005), with Kevin M. Kruse. His 2008 book Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in History and a main selection of the History Book Club. He is also author of Not Even Past: Barack Obama and the Burden of Race. [5] His most recent book is These United States: The Making of a Nation, 1890 to the Present with Glenda Gilmore. He is currently writing a history of the rise and transformation of the real estate industry in modern America. He has also published essays and reviews in the Wall Street Journal , New York Times , Washington Post , The Nation , London Review of Books , Chicago Tribune , Philadelphia Inquirer , and Detroit Free Press . In 2010 he served as a guest-blogger for Ta-Nehisi Coates at The Atlantic .

<i>The Origins of the Urban Crisis</i> book by Thomas Sugrue

The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit is the first book by historian and Detroit native Thomas J. Sugrue in which he examines the role race, housing, job discrimination, and capital flight played in the decline of Detroit. Sugrue argues that the decline of Detroit began long before the 1967 race riot. Sugrue argues that institutionalized and often legalized racism resulted in sharply limited opportunities for African Americans in Detroit for most of the 20th century. He also argues that the process of deindustrialization, the flight of investment and jobs from the city, began in the 1950s as employers moved to suburban areas and small towns and also introduced new labor-saving technologies. The book has won multiple awards including a Bancroft Prize in 1998.

Princeton University Press independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University

Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University. Its mission is to disseminate scholarship within academia and society at large.

The Bancroft Prize is awarded each year by the trustees of Columbia University for books about diplomacy or the history of the Americas. It was established in 1948 by a bequest from Frederic Bancroft. The prize has been generally considered to be among the most prestigious awards in the field of American history writing and comes with a $10,000 stipend. Seventeen winners had their work supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, and 16 winners were also recipients of the Pulitzer Prize for History.

He is a Fellow of the New York Institute for the Humanities (since 2016). [6]

The New York Institute for the Humanities (NYIH) is an academic organisation affiliated with New York University, founded by Richard Sennett in 1976 to promote the exchange of ideas between academics, professionals and the general public. The NYIH regularly holds seminars open to the public, as well as meetings for its approximately 150 Fellows.

Background

Sugrue is active in civic affairs. Most notably, he served as an expert for the University of Michigan in two federal court cases regarding affirmative action in the undergraduate and law school admissions-- Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger , decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2003. He served as vice chair of the City of Philadelphia Historical Commission from 2001-2008. Sugrue is a popular teacher—winner of two teaching awards—and mentor to many dissertation students. He is also a well-regarded public speaker, having given more than 300 talks to audiences at universities, foundations, community groups, and religious congregations throughout the United States and in Canada, Britain, France, Argentina, Japan, Israel, and Germany.

University of Michigan Public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States

The University of Michigan, often simply referred to as Michigan, is a public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The university is Michigan's oldest; it was founded in 1817 in Detroit, as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, 20 years before the territory became a state. The school was moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the flagship university campus has expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 34 million gross square feet spread out over a Central Campus and North Campus, two regional campuses in Flint and Dearborn, and a Center in Detroit. The university is a founding member of the Association of American Universities.

Grutter v. Bollinger, 539 U.S. 306 (2003), was a landmark case of the Supreme Court of the United States concerning affirmative action in student admissions. The Court held that a student admissions process that favors "underrepresented minority groups" does not violate the Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause so long as it takes into account other factors evaluated on an individual basis for every applicant.

Gratz v. Bollinger, 539 U.S. 244 (2003), was a United States Supreme Court case regarding the University of Michigan undergraduate affirmative action admissions policy. In a 6–3 decision announced on June 23, 2003, Chief Justice Rehnquist, writing for the Court, ruled the University's point system's "predetermined point allocations" that awarded 20 points towards admission to underrepresented minorities "ensures that the diversity contributions of applicants cannot be individually assessed" and was therefore unconstitutional.

Selected works

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References

  1. https://sites.google.com/site/thomasjosephsugrue/bio
  2. http://www.sas.upenn.edu/sspf
  3. Sugrue, Thomas J. (1996). The Origins of the Urban Crisis Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit . Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. p. li. ISBN   978-0691162553.
  4. https://www.carnegie.org/interactives/acfellows/#!/
  5. Diamond A.J., "Colorblindness and Racial Politics in the Era of Obama," Review of 'Not Even Past,' Books and Ideas, December 2010. and McNeil D. Review of 'Not Even Past: Barack Obama and the burden of race'. Social Identities 2010, 16(6).
  6. http://nyihumanities.org/all-features/new-fellows-2016