Princeton University Press

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Princeton University Press
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Founded 1905
Founder Whitney Darrow
Country of origin United States
Headquarters location Princeton, New Jersey
Distribution Ingram Publisher Services (Americas, Asia, Australia)
John Wiley & Sons (EMEA, India)
United Publishers Services (Japan) [1]
Publication types Books
Official website

press.princeton.edu

Princeton University Press
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Location 41 William Street, Princeton, New Jersey
Coordinates 40°20′59.8″N74°39′13.3″W / 40.349944°N 74.653694°W / 40.349944; -74.653694 Coordinates: 40°20′59.8″N74°39′13.3″W / 40.349944°N 74.653694°W / 40.349944; -74.653694
Built 1911
Architect Ernest Flagg
Architectural style Collegiate Gothic
Part of Princeton Historic District (#75001143)
Added to NRHP 27 June 1975

Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University. Its mission is to disseminate scholarship within academia and society at large.

Academic publishing is the subfield of publishing which distributes academic research and scholarship. Most academic work is published in academic journal article, book or thesis form. The part of academic written output that is not formally published but merely printed up or posted on the Internet is often called "grey literature". Most scientific and scholarly journals, and many academic and scholarly books, though not all, are based on some form of peer review or editorial refereeing to qualify texts for publication. Peer review quality and selectivity standards vary greatly from journal to journal, publisher to publisher, and field to field.

Princeton University University in Princeton, New Jersey

Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, and renamed itself Princeton University in 1896.

Society Social group involved in persistent social interaction

A society is a group of individuals involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory, typically subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations. Societies are characterized by patterns of relationships between individuals who share a distinctive culture and institutions; a given society may be described as the sum total of such relationships among its constituent of members. In the social sciences, a larger society often exhibits stratification or dominance patterns in subgroups.

Contents

The press was founded by Whitney Darrow, with the financial support of Charles Scribner, as a printing press to serve the Princeton community in 1905. [2] Its distinctive building was constructed in 1911 on William Street in Princeton. [3] Its first book was a new 1912 edition of John Witherspoon's Lectures on Moral Philosophy. [4]

Charles Scribner II American businessman

Charles Scribner II was the president of Charles Scribner's Sons and a trustee at Skidmore College.

Printing press device for evenly printing ink onto a print medium

A printing press is a mechanical device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium, thereby transferring the ink. It marked a dramatic improvement on earlier printing methods in which the cloth, paper or other medium was brushed or rubbed repeatedly to achieve the transfer of ink, and accelerated the process. Typically used for texts, the invention and global spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium.

John Witherspoon Scottish-American Presbyterian minister and a Founding Father of the United States

John Knox Witherspoon was a Scottish-American Presbyterian minister and a Founding Father of the United States. Witherspoon embraced the concepts of Scottish common sense realism, and while president of the College of New Jersey, became an influential figure in the development of the United States' national character. Politically active, Witherspoon was a delegate from New Jersey to the Second Continental Congress and a signatory to the July 4, 1776, Declaration of Independence. He was the only active clergyman and the only college president to sign the Declaration. Later, he signed the Articles of Confederation and supported ratification of the Constitution. In 1789 he was convening moderator of the First General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America.

History

Princeton University Press was founded in 1905 by a recent Princeton graduate, Whitney Darrow, with financial support from another Princetonian, Charles Scribner II. Darrow and Scribner purchased the equipment and assumed the operations of two already existing local publishers, that of the Princeton Alumni Weekly and the Princeton Press. The new press printed both local newspapers, university documents, The Daily Princetonian , and later added book publishing to its activities. [5] Beginning as a small, for-profit printer, Princeton University Press was reincorporated as a nonprofit in 1910. [6] Since 1911, the press has been headquartered in a purpose-built gothic-style building designed by Ernest Flagg. The design of press’s building, which was named the Scribner Building in 1965, was inspired by the Plantin-Moretus Museum, a printing museum in Antwerp, Belgium. Princeton University Press established a European office, in Woodstock, England, north of Oxford, in 1999, and opened an additional office, in Beijing, in early 2017.

<i>The Daily Princetonian</i>

The Daily Princetonian is the award-winning daily independent student newspaper of Princeton University. Founded in 1876 and daily since 1892, the Princetonian is among the oldest college newspapers in the country. Its alumni have pursued careers in journalism at The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and have won the Pulitzer Prize.

Ernest Flagg American architect

Ernest Flagg was a noted American architect in the Beaux-Arts style. He was also an advocate for urban reform and architecture's social responsibility.

Pulitzers and other major awards

Six books from Princeton University Press have won Pulitzer Prizes:

Pulitzer Prize U.S. award for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature, and musical composition

The Pulitzer Prize is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of American (Hungarian-born) Joseph Pulitzer who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher, and is administered by Columbia University in New York City. Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a US$15,000 cash award. The winner in the public service category of the journalism competition is awarded a gold medal.

<i>Russia Leaves the War</i> book by George Kennan

Russia Leaves the War (1956) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning book by George F. Kennan, which won the 1957 Pulitzer Prize for History, the 1957 National Book Award for Nonfiction,the 1957 George Bancroft Prize, and the 1957 Francis Parkman Prize. The first of two volumes discussing Soviet-American relations from 1917-1920, it covers the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the departure of Russia from World War I in 1918. The second volume, The Decision to Intervene (1958) explores U.S. involvement in Siberia.

George F. Kennan American advisor, diplomat, political scientist and historian

George Frost Kennan was an American diplomat and historian. He was best known as an advocate of a policy of containment of Soviet expansion during the Cold War. He lectured widely and wrote scholarly histories of the relations between the USSR and the United States. He was also one of the group of foreign policy elders known as "The Wise Men".

Bray Hammond was an American financial historian and assistant secretary to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in 1944-1950. He won the 1958 Pulitzer Prize for History for Banks and Politics in America from the Revolution to the Civil War (1957). He was educated at Stanford University.

Books from Princeton University Press have also been awarded the Bancroft Prize, the Nautilus Book Award, and the National Book Award.

The Bancroft Prize is awarded each year by the trustees of Columbia University for books about diplomacy or the history of the Americas. It was established in 1948 by a bequest from Frederic Bancroft. The prize has been generally considered to be among the most prestigious awards in the field of American history writing and comes with a $10,000 stipend. Seventeen winners had their work supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, and 16 winners were also recipients of the Pulitzer Prize for History.

The National Book Awards are a set of annual U.S. literary awards. At the final National Book Awards Ceremony every November, the National Book Foundation presents the National Book Awards and two lifetime achievement awards to authors.

Papers projects

Multi-volume historical documents projects undertaken by the Press include:

The Papers of Woodrow Wilson has been called "one of the great editorial achievements in all history." [13]

Bollingen Series

Princeton University Press's Bollingen Series had its beginnings in the Bollingen Foundation, a 1943 project of Paul Mellon's Old Dominion Foundation. From 1945, the foundation had independent status, publishing and providing fellowships and grants in several areas of study, including archaeology, poetry, and psychology. The Bollingen Series was given to the university in 1969.

Other series

Sciences

Humanities

Selected titles

Related Research Articles

Booth Tarkington American novelist

Newton Booth Tarkington was an American novelist and dramatist best known for his novels The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams. He is one of only three novelists to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction more than once, along with William Faulkner and John Updike. Although he is little read now, in the 1910s and 1920s he was considered America's greatest living author.

Ray Stannard Baker American journalist and writer

Ray Stannard Baker was an American journalist, historian, biographer, and author.

Albert W. Tucker American mathematician

Albert William Tucker was a Canadian mathematician who made important contributions in topology, game theory, and non-linear programming.

Richard Eberhart American poet

Richard Ghormley Eberhart was an American poet who published more than a dozen books of poetry and approximately twenty works in total. "Richard Eberhart emerged out of the 1930s as a modern stylist with romantic sensibilities." He won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for Selected Poems, 1930–1965 and the 1977 National Book Award for Poetry for Collected Poems, 1930–1976. He is the grandfather of former Red Sox general manager Ben Cherington.

Alfred Einstein German-American musicologist and music editor

Alfred Einstein was a German-American musicologist and music editor. He is best known for being the editor of the first major revision of the Köchel catalogue, which was published in the year 1936. The Köchel catalogue is the extensive catalogue of the works of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Frank Bidart American poet

Frank Bidart is an American academic and poet, and a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry.

William Morris Meredith Jr. American poet

William Morris Meredith Jr. was an American poet and educator. He was Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 1978 to 1980.

A. Scott Berg Biographer, journalist

Andrew Scott Berg is an American biographer.

Arthur Stanley Link was an American historian and educator, known as the leading authority on U.S. President Woodrow Wilson.

John Stachel is an American physicist and philosopher of science.

Einstein Papers Project

The Einstein Papers Project was established in 1986 to assemble, preserve, translate, and publish papers selected from the literary estate of Albert Einstein and from other collections.

Wesleyan University Press is a university press that is part of Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. The Press is currently directed by Suzanna Tamminen, a published poet and essayist.

Barton David Gellman is an American journalist and bestselling author known for his reports on the September 11 attacks, on Dick Cheney's vice presidency and on the global surveillance disclosure.

Charles Howard McIlwain was an American historian and political scientist. He won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1924. He was educated at Princeton University and Harvard University and taught at both institutions, as well as the University of Oxford, Miami University, and Bowdoin College. Though he trained as a lawyer, his career was mostly academic, devoted to constitutional history. He was a member of several learned societies and served as President of the American Historical Association in 1935–36.

This bibliography of Woodrow Wilson is a list of published works about Woodrow Wilson, 28th President of the United States.

Princeton University Department of History

The Princeton University Department of History is an academic department at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey. The department is one of the leading and most prestigious history departments in the country, offering coursework at the undergraduate and graduate levels in numerous fields and subfields. The department is home to approximately 60 faculty members, many of whom teach courses in other departments as well. The 2018 U.S. News & World Report ranked the department as No. 1 in the United States, tied with Stanford University and Yale University, while the National Research Council ranked the department as No. 1 in the country for research and scholarship.

Princeton University Department of Mathematics

The Princeton University Department of Mathematics is an academic department at Princeton University. Founded in 1760, the department has trained some of the world's most renowned and internationally recognized scholars of mathematics. Notable individuals affiliated with the department include John Nash, Senior Research Mathematician and winner of the 1994 Nobel Prize; Alan Turing, who received his doctorates from the department; and Albert Einstein who frequently gave lectures at Princeton and had an office in the building.

References

Further reading

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