Office of Population Research

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Office of Population Research
Wallace Hall.jpg
Wallace Hall, home to the Office of Population Research
Type Private
Established1936
Parent institution
Princeton University
Director Douglas S. Massey
Academic staff
38 professors, lecturers, and researchers (2018) [1]
Students29 graduate students (2018) [2]
Location, ,
United States
Website www.opr.princeton.edu

The Office of Population Research (OPR) at Princeton University is the oldest population research center in the United States. Founded in 1936, the OPR is a leading demographic research and training center. [3] Recent research activity has primarily focused on healthcare, social demography, urbanization, and migration. The OPR's research has been cited in numerous articles by the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal . [4] [5] [6]

Princeton University University in Princeton, New Jersey

Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, and renamed itself Princeton University in 1896.

Population All the organisms of a given species that live in the specified region

In biology, a population is all the organisms of the same group or species, which live in a particular geographical area, and have the capability of interbreeding. The area of a sexual population is the area where inter-breeding is potentially possible between any pair within the area, and where the probability of interbreeding is greater than the probability of cross-breeding with individuals from other areas.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe, which is 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City. Most of the country is located contiguously in North America between Canada and Mexico.

Contents

History

Major General and philanthropist Frederick H. Osborn, a graduate of Princeton University, laid the foundation for the Office of Population Research in 1936. [7] The founding director of OPR was Frank W. Notestein, who was a demographer at the Milbank Memorial Fund, a leading peer-reviewed healthcare journal. While at the OPR, he was also the director of the Population Division of the United Nations between 1946 and 1948. He left in 1959 to lead the Population Council, an international, nonprofit, non-governmental organization. He was succeeded as OPR director by Ansley J. Coale, who held the post from 1959 to 1975. One of the early faculty appointments was Irene Barnes Taeuber, whose scholarly work helped found the science of demography. [8]

Major General Frederick Henry Osborn was an American philanthropist, military leader, and eugenicist. He was a founder of several organizations and played a central part in reorienting eugenics in the years following World War II away from the race- and class-consciousness of earlier periods. The American Philosophical Society considers him to have been "the respectable face of eugenic research in the post-war period."(APS, 1983)

Frank Wallace Notestein was an American demographer who contributed significantly to the development of the science. He was the founding director of the Office of Population Research at Princeton University, and later president of the Population Council. He was the first director-consultant of the Population Division of the United Nations from 1947–1948.

<i>Milbank Quarterly</i> journal

The Milbank Quarterly is a quarterly peer-reviewed healthcare journal covering health care policy. It was established in 1923 and is published by John Wiley & Sons on behalf of the Milbank Memorial Fund, an endowed national foundation funded by Elizabeth Milbank Anderson that supports research of issues related to population health and health policy. It covers topics such as the impact of social factors on health, prevention, allocation of health care resources, legal and ethical issues in health policy, health and health care administration, and the organization and financing of health care.

The current Director of the OPR is Douglas Massey, an American sociologist and Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Douglas Massey American sociologist

Douglas Steven Massey is an American sociologist. Massey is currently a professor of Sociology at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and is an adjunct professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. Massey specializes in the sociology of immigration, and has written on the effect of residential segregation on the black underclass in the United States.

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs professional public policy school at Princeton University

The Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs is a professional public policy school at Princeton University. The school provides an array of comprehensive coursework in the fields of international development, foreign policy, science and technology, and economics and finance through its undergraduate (AB) degrees, graduate Master of Public Affairs (MPA), Master of Public Policy (MPP), and Ph.D. degrees. Since 2012, Cecilia Rouse has been dean of the Woodrow Wilson School. The school is consistently ranked as one of the best institutions for the study of international relations and public affairs in the country and in the world. Foreign Policy ranks the Woodrow Wilson School as No. 2 in International Relations at the undergraduate and at the Ph.D. level in the world behind the Harvard Kennedy School.

Academics

The OPR offers four degrees and certifications for graduate students at Princeton: [9]

Princeton University Graduate School

The Graduate School of Princeton University is the main graduate school of Princeton University. Founded in 1869, the School is responsible for the majority of Princeton's master's and doctoral degree programs in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and engineering. The school offers Master of Arts (MA), Master of Science (MS), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees in 42 disciplines. It also administers several pre-professional programs, including the Master in Finance (M.Fin.), Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.), and Master of Engineering (M.Eng.), Master in Public Affairs (M.P.A.), Master in Public Policy (M.P.P.), and Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) degrees.

Ph.D. in Demography

The Ph.D. in Demography enrolls a small number of graduate students with an interest in population research and strong quantitative backgrounds, such as statistics and mathematics. The program allows students to select up to two fields of concentration. [10]

Statistics Study of the collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of data

Statistics is the discipline that concerns the collection, organization, displaying, analysis, interpretation and presentation of data. In applying statistics to a scientific, industrial, or social problem, it is conventional to begin with a statistical population or a statistical model to be studied. Populations can be diverse groups of people or objects such as "all people living in a country" or "every atom composing a crystal". Statistics deals with every aspect of data, including the planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiments. See glossary of probability and statistics.

Mathematics Field of study concerning quantity, patterns and change

Mathematics includes the study of such topics as quantity, structure (algebra), space (geometry), and change. It has no generally accepted definition.

Department Degree with Specialization in Population

Doctoral candidates in other departments at Princeton are able to work towards a specialization in Population. Most of these students work primarily in the Departments of Economics or Sociology, while some may also come from the Departments of History or Politics. [11]

Princeton University Department of Economics

The Princeton University Department of Economics is an academic department of Princeton University, an Ivy League institution in Princeton, New Jersey. The department is one of the most premier institutions for the study of economics. It offers undergraduate A.B. degrees as well as graduate Ph.D. degrees. It is considered one of the "big five" schools in the field along with the faculties at the University of Chicago, Harvard University, Stanford University, and MIT. According to the 2018 U.S. News & World Report, the department ranks as No. 1 in the field of economics.

Princeton University Department of History

The Princeton University Department of History is a world renowned academic department at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1871, the department is one of the leading programs in the country for the study of history. Its focus is in both teaching, offering coursework at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and in research, organizing numerous research initiatives and public events. The department is home to approximately 60 faculty members, many of whom teach courses in other departments as well.

Joint-Degree Program

The Joint-Degree Program allows students interested specifically in Social Policy to apply for a specialized program. Students apply after their first or second year of graduate study and must complete additional coursework in “Issues in Inequality and Social Policy,” and “Advanced Empirical Workshop.” [12] In the 2018-2019 academic year, there were nine students concentrating in Social Policy.

Certificate in Demography

The Office of Population Research, in connection with the Program in Population Studies, offers a non-degree Certificate in Demography for students who complete four approved courses, one Independent Reading course, and one elective. Students must complete an individual or joint-research project under the supervision of an OPR faculty or research. Students who complete this certificate are often enrolled in the Master's of Public Administration program at the Woodrow Wilson School. [13]

Research

Specialties

Research conducted at the OPR falls within six categories: [14]

Affiliations

The OPR maintains close relations with other departments within the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Because of its inherent interdisciplinary research, the OPR works with researchers at the Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing (CRCW), the Center for Migration and Development (CMD), and the Center for Health and Wellbeing (CHW). [15] Outside of Princeton, the OPR maintains partnerships with some of the world's leading research centers, including the Wiggenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital and the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. [16] [17]

Related Research Articles

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars think tank in the U.S.

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, located in Washington, D.C., is a United States Presidential Memorial that was established as part of the Smithsonian Institution by an act of Congress in 1968. It is also a highly recognized think tank, ranked among the top ten in the world.

The New York University Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development is the secondary liberal arts and education school of New York University. Founded in 1890, is the first school of pedagogy to be established at an American university. Prior to 2001, it was known as the NYU School of Education.

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Princeton University Department of Psychology

The Princeton University Department of Psychology, located in Peretsman-Scully Hall, is an academic department of Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey. For over a century, the department has been one of the most notable psychology departments in the country. It has been home to psychologists who have made well-known scientific discoveries in the fields of psychology and neuroscience.

Christina Paxson economist, academic and administrator

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Irene Barnes Taeuber was an American demographer who worked for the Office of Population Research at Princeton University, where she edited the journal Population Index from 1936 to 1954. Her scholarly work is credited with helping to establish the science of demography.

Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy and Finance

The Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy and Finance (JRC) is a leading research center at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs of Princeton University. Founded in 2011, the JRC primarily promotes research on public policy as it relates to financial markets and macroeconomics. The center has also expanded its research and teaching to multiple disciplines, including economics, operations research, political science, history, and ethics.

Princeton University Department of Chemistry

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Princeton University Department of Mathematics

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References

  1. "Faculty". Office of Population Research.
  2. "Graduate Students". Office of Population Research.
  3. "Office of Population Research". JSTOR.
  4. Board, The Editorial (2015-09-15). "How Segregation Destroys Black Wealth". The New York Times.
  5. "Kills 99.9% of Germs -- Under Some Lab Conditions". The Wall Street Journal.
  6. "F.D.A. Approves 5-Day Emergency Contraceptive". The New York Times.
  7. "The Office of Population Research". A Princeton Companion.
  8. Frank W. Notestein, Obituary: Irene Barnes Taeuber 1906-1974, Population Index, Vol. 40, No. 1 (Jan., 1974) JSTOR   2733535
  9. "Programs of Study". The Office of Population Research.
  10. "Programs of Study". The Office of Population Research.
  11. "Programs of Study". The Office of Population Research.
  12. "Degree Requirements". Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
  13. "Programs of Study". The Office of Population Research.
  14. "Research at OPR". The Office of Population Research.
  15. "Research". Office of Population Research.
  16. "Partners". Wittgenstein Centre.
  17. "Links". United Nations Economic Commission for Europe.

Coordinates: 40°20′57″N74°39′13″W / 40.34914°N 74.65362°W / 40.34914; -74.65362