University Cottage Club

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University Cottage Club
University Cottage Club Princeton.JPG
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Location Princeton, New Jersey
Coordinates 40°20′53.8″N74°39′06.2″W / 40.348278°N 74.651722°W / 40.348278; -74.651722 Coordinates: 40°20′53.8″N74°39′06.2″W / 40.348278°N 74.651722°W / 40.348278; -74.651722
Built1906
ArchitectMcKim, Charles Follen; McKim, Mead, and White
Architectural styleColonial Revival
Part of Princeton Historic District (ID75001143)
NRHP reference No. 99001315 [1]
NJRHP No.175 [2]
Significant dates
Added to NRHPNovember 19, 1999
Designated NJRHPSeptember 14, 1999

The University Cottage Club or simply Cottage Club is one of eleven current eating clubs at Princeton University, in Princeton, New Jersey, United States. It is also one of the six bicker clubs, along with The Ivy Club, Tiger Inn, Cap and Gown Club, Cannon Club and Tower Club.

Contents

History

In 1884, a group of freshmen who called themselves "The Seven Wise Men of Grease" of the Class of 1888, chose to eat in a private room on the second floor of Dohm's Restaurant on Nassau Street across from the campus. In their sophomore year, the group moved up Nassau Street to a hotel on the corner of Railroad Avenue (now University Place) known as The University Hotel. In September of their junior year as they were joined by several other students, they found a small house immediately south of The University Hotel on Railroad Avenue (where Hamilton Hall now stands) owned by the college, known as "The University Cottage". A couple was hired to cook and serve their meals. Prior to their graduation in 1888, the group invited members from the sophomore class to join their new venue. In 1889, new members of this society adopted legal papers and agreed on the name "The University Cottage Club of Princeton." [3]

In 1890, a lot on Prospect Avenue (upon which today's clubhouse stands) was purchased and a shingled Victorian clubhouse was built in 1892. The enrollment continued to grow and this structure was moved to Library Place when plans were made for a larger building. The current 2 12-story Georgian Revival clubhouse was designed by Charles Follen McKim of the New York architectural firm McKim, Mead and White in 1903 and built in 1906.

The library on the second floor is modeled on the fourteenth century library in Merton College, Oxford University. In the Dining Room, one such carving reads “Ubi Amici Ibidem Sunt Opes” (“Where there are friends there are riches”) which has become over the years a motto of the Club.

In 1979, Cottage Club was one of three all-male eating clubs sued by 1980 Princeton graduate Sally Frank for sex discrimination. Ms. Frank prevailed in 1985. Following the suit, the Club voted to admit women in early 1986. Cottage has historically been numbered among the "Big Four" eating clubs of Princeton University (the others are Ivy, Cap and Gown, and Tiger Inn). [4]

Recent renovations have kept the club in first-class condition while preserving its historic beauty. Many young literary enthusiasts like to visit the library where F. Scott Fitzgerald began his novel This Side of Paradise .

On September 14, 1999, the Club was entered onto the New Jersey Register of Historic Places. On November 15, 1999, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places based on the architectural structure of the building, high degree of historic integrity, and significant cultural contributions to the community.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Ivy Club United States historic place

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Nassau Hall is the oldest building at Princeton University in Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. In 1783 it served as the United States Capitol building for four months. At the time it was built in 1756, Nassau Hall was the largest building in colonial New Jersey and the largest academic building in the American colonies.

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Terrace Club United States historic place

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Cap and Gown Club United States historic place

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Nassau Inn

The Nassau Inn is the only full-service hotel in downtown Princeton, New Jersey, United States. It first opened at 52 Nassau Street in 1769 in a home built in 1756. The Inn experienced British occupation during the American Revolution and played host to members of the Continental Congress when it met in nearby Nassau Hall. In 1937, the original inn was demolished to make way for the Palmer Square development and a new, larger, inn opened at 10 Palmer Square in 1938. The hotel's restaurant, the Yankee Doodle Tap Room, has a large mural by Norman Rockwell, depicting Yankee Doodle, behind the bar. It is within walking distance of Princeton University.

Eating clubs at Princeton University

The eating clubs at Princeton University are private institutions resembling both dining halls and social houses, where the majority of Princeton upperclassmen eat their meals. Each eating club occupies a large mansion on Prospect Avenue, one of the main roads that runs through the Princeton campus, with the exception of Terrace Club which is just around the corner on Washington Road. This area is known to students colloquially as "The Street". Princeton's eating clubs are the primary setting in F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1920 debut novel, This Side of Paradise, and the clubs appeared prominently in the 2004 novel The Rule of Four.

Prospect House (Princeton, New Jersey) United States historic place

Prospect House, known also as just Prospect, in Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, is a fine example of the work of architect John Notman who helped popularize Italianate architecture in America.

Presidents House (Princeton University) United States historic place

The President's House, also known as the John Maclean House, or simply the Maclean House, in Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, was built to serve as the home of the President of the College of New Jersey, which later became Princeton University. It was completed in 1756, the same year as Nassau Hall. John Witherspoon lived here from 1768 through 1779, during which time he served as a delegate to the Continental Congress and signed the Declaration of Independence. George Washington occupied Maclean House in January 1777, during the Battle of Princeton and in 1783 while Congress met in Nassau Hall.

Princeton Historic District (Princeton, New Jersey) United States historic place

The Princeton Historic District is a 370-acre (150 ha) historic district located in Princeton, New Jersey that was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1975. It stretches from Marquand Park in the west to the Eating Clubs in the East, from the Princeton Cemetery in the north to the Graduate College in the south. The district encompasses the core parts of the campuses of the Princeton Theological Seminary and Princeton University. It also includes the business district centered on Nassau Street and many historic homes, both mansions in the western section and more humble dwellings in the Witherspoon/Jackson neighborhood. Notable churches within the district include Nassau Presbyterian Church, Trinity Episcopal, Nassau Christian Center, and the Princeton University Chapel. The district is home to seven of Princeton's nine, and New Jersey's fifty-eight, National Historic Landmarks, the largest concentration of such sites in the state.

Peacock Inn (Princeton, New Jersey)

The Peacock Inn is a historic restaurant and inn in Princeton, New Jersey. The building itself dates to the 18th century and was originally located at the corner of Nassau Street and University Place. During the American Revolution it was the home of Jonathan Deare, and played host to members of the Continental Congress when they met in nearby Nassau Hall. It was moved to its current location in 1875 by famed archaeologist and Olympic athlete William Libbey. Joseph and Helen O'Conner purchased the property in 1911 and opened the Peacock Inn, naming it after an inn in Derbyshire, England. The Inn has 16 guest rooms but is most known for its restaurant, consistently rated one of the finest in the state.

Cannon Club United States historic place

Cannon Club, also known as Cannon Dial Elm Club, is one of the historic Eating Clubs at Princeton University. Founded in 1895, it completed its current clubhouse in 1910. The club closed in the early 1970s and later merged with Dial Lodge and Elm Club to form Dial, Elm, Cannon (DEC), which closed its doors in 1998. In 2011 DEC reopened, now bearing the name Cannon Dial Elm Club, using its historic clubhouse, which had served as the home for the Office of Population Research during the club's hiatus.

Nassau Club

The Nassau Club of Princeton, New Jersey, founded in 1889 by, among others, Woodrow Wilson as a town-and-gown club to bring the townspeople and the University faculty together, is now a private social club. It moved into its current location in 1903. The clubhouse was originally built in 1813-14 as the home of Samuel Miller, the second professor of the Princeton Theological Seminary, on land belonging to his father-in-law, Continental Congressman Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant. Sergeant had built a large house on the site shortly before the American Revolution but it was burned down during the British occupation prior to the Battle of Princeton.

References

  1. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. March 15, 2006.
  2. "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places — Mercer County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection — Historic Preservation Office. April 5, 2013. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 16, 2013. Retrieved June 4, 2013.
  3. Selden, William K. Club Life at Princeton, A Historical Account of the Eating Clubs at Princeton University. Princeton Prospect Foundation, 1994, p10. ISBN   0-9634444-4-1
  4. Donaldson, Scott (2001). Fool for Love: F. Scott Fitzgerald . Bloomington, IN: iUniverse. pp.  27. ISBN   978-0-595-18170-4.